I'm trying to make a custom authorization attribute in ASP.NET Core. In previous versions it was possible to override bool AuthorizeCore(HttpContextBase httpContext). But this no longer exists in AuthorizeAttribute.

What is the current approach to make a custom AuthorizeAttribute?

What I am trying to accomplish: I am receiving a session ID in the Header Authorization. From that ID I'll know whether a particular action is valid.

  • I'm not sure how to do it, but MVC is open source. You could pull the github repo and look for implementations of IAuthorizationFilter. If I have time today I'll look for you and post an actual answer, but no promises. github repo: github.com/aspnet/Mvc – Eric Burcham Jul 16 '15 at 21:07
  • OK, out of time, but look for usages of AuthorizationPolicy in the MVC Repo, which uses AuthorizeAttribute, in the aspnet/Security repo, here: github.com/aspnet/Security. Alternately, look in the MVC repo for the namespace where the security stuff you care about seems to reside, which is Microsoft.AspNet.Authorization. Sorry I can't be more helpful. Good luck! – Eric Burcham Jul 16 '15 at 21:30
up vote 205 down vote accepted

The approach recommended by the ASP.Net Core team is to use the new policy design which is fully documented here. The basic idea behind the new approach is to use the new [Authorize] attribute to designate a "policy" (e.g. [Authorize( Policy = "YouNeedToBe18ToDoThis")] where the policy is registered in the application's Startup.cs to execute some block of code (i.e. ensure the user has an age claim where the age is 18 or older).

The policy design is a great addition to the framework and the ASP.Net Security Core team should be commended for its introduction. That said, it isn't well-suited for all cases. The shortcoming of this approach is that it fails to provide a convenient solution for the most common need of simply asserting that a given controller or action requires a given claim type. In the case where an application may have hundreds of discrete permissions governing CRUD operations on individual REST resources ("CanCreateOrder", "CanReadOrder", "CanUpdateOrder", "CanDeleteOrder", etc.), the new approach either requires repetitive one-to-one mappings between a policy name and a claim name (e.g. options.AddPolicy("CanUpdateOrder", policy => policy.RequireClaim(MyClaimTypes.Permission, "CanUpdateOrder));), or writing some code to perform these registrations at run time (e.g. read all claim types from a database and perform the aforementioned call in a loop). The problem with this approach for the majority of cases is that it's unnecessary overhead.

While the ASP.Net Core Security team recommends never creating your own solution, in some cases this may be the most prudent option with which to start.

The following is an implementation which uses the IAuthorizationFilter to provide a simple way to express a claim requirement for a given controller or action:

public class ClaimRequirementAttribute : TypeFilterAttribute
{
    public ClaimRequirementAttribute(string claimType, string claimValue) : base(typeof(ClaimRequirementFilter))
    {
        Arguments = new object[] {new Claim(claimType, claimValue) };
    }
}

public class ClaimRequirementFilter : IAuthorizationFilter
{
    readonly Claim _claim;

    public ClaimRequirementFilter(Claim claim)
    {
        _claim = claim;
    }

    public void  OnAuthorization(AuthorizationFilterContext context)
    {
        var hasClaim = context.HttpContext.User.Claims.Any(c => c.Type == _claim.Type && c.Value == _claim.Value);
        if (!hasClaim)
        {
            context.Result = new ForbidResult();
        }
    }
}


[Route("api/resource")]
public class MyController : Controller
{
    [ClaimRequirement(MyClaimTypes.Permission, "CanReadResource")]
    [HttpGet]
    public IActionResult GetResource()
    {
        return Ok();
    }
}
  • 30
    This should be marked as the CORRECT ANSWER. Here you see how the people at Microsoft considers the developers feedback. I don't understand the reason they are so "closed minded" arround this, since it's a very common situation to have a miriad of different permissions, having to code one policy for each one is a complete overkill. I was looking for this for such a long time... (I already asked this question almost two years ago, when vNext was still a bet here: stackoverflow.com/questions/32181400/… but we're still stuck there) – Vi100 Mar 10 '17 at 12:00
  • 1
    This is good stuff. We have authentication middleware on the Web API but grained security on the authorization permissions by role; so having to just throw in an attribute like: [MyAuthorize(MyClaimTypes.Permission, MyClaimValueTypes.Write, MyPermission.Employee)] looks very fine. – Mariano Peinador Apr 21 '17 at 1:07
  • 1
    Best answer!!!!!!!!!!!! – David Wruck Apr 26 '17 at 0:50
  • 1
    @Derek Greer: This is the best answer. However, you are implement an ActionFilter which run after Authorize Action Filter. Is there anyway to implement and Authorize Action Filter? – Jacob Phan Sep 8 '17 at 4:03
  • 2
    @JacobPhan You're correct, this would be better implemented using the IAuthorizationFilter interface. I've updated the code to reflect the changes. – Derek Greer Sep 8 '17 at 18:22

I'm the asp.net security person. Firstly let me apologise that none of this is documented yet outside of the musicstore sample or unit tests, and it's all still being refined in terms of exposed APIs. Detailed documentation is here.

We don't want you writing custom authorize attributes. If you need to do that we've done something wrong. Instead you should be writing authorization requirements.

Authorization acts upon Identities. Identities are created by authentication.

You say in comments you want to check a session ID in a header. Your session ID would be the basis for an identity. If you wanted to use the Authorize attribute you'd write an authentication middleware to take that header and turn it into an authenticated ClaimsPrincipal. You would then check that inside an authorization requirement. Authorization requirements can be as complicated as you like, for example here's one that takes a date of birth claim on the current identity and will authorize if the user is over 18;

public class Over18Requirement : AuthorizationHandler<Over18Requirement>, IAuthorizationRequirement
{
        public override void Handle(AuthorizationHandlerContext context, Over18Requirement requirement)
        {
            if (!context.User.HasClaim(c => c.Type == ClaimTypes.DateOfBirth))
            {
                context.Fail();
                return;
            }

            var dateOfBirth = Convert.ToDateTime(context.User.FindFirst(c => c.Type == ClaimTypes.DateOfBirth).Value);
            int age = DateTime.Today.Year - dateOfBirth.Year;
            if (dateOfBirth > DateTime.Today.AddYears(-age))
            {
                age--;
            }

            if (age >= 18)
            {
                context.Succeed(requirement);
            }
            else
            {
                context.Fail();
            }
        }
    }
}

Then in your ConfigureServices() function you'd wire it up

services.AddAuthorization(options =>
{
    options.AddPolicy("Over18", 
        policy => policy.Requirements.Add(new Authorization.Over18Requirement()));
});

And finally apply it to a controller or action method with

[Authorize(Policy = "Over18")]
  • 53
    I wonder... how would one implement a fine grained access control with that? Let's say the ManageStore Requirement from Music Store sample. As it's in the sample, there is only an either "allow all or nothing" way to do it. Do we then have to create a new policy for every possible permutation? i.e. "Users/Read", "Users/Create", "Users/AssignRole", "Users/Delete" if we want fine-grained claims? Sounds like pretty much setup work to get it working and abundance of policies just to manage claims rather than a [ClaimsAutzorization("User", "Read", "Create", "Delete", "Assign")] attribute? – Tseng Aug 30 '15 at 12:31
  • 50
    I have to comment that, all this is more complex than implementing a custom authorization method. I know how I want authorization to be done I could just go and write it in MVC 5, in MVC 6 they add a lot of "done" code that is actually more complex to understand than implementing the core "thing" itself. Gets me sitting in front of a page trying to figure something out instead of writing code right through, also a big pain for people who use RDBMS other than Microsoft's (or No-Sql). – Felype Dec 10 '15 at 17:24
  • 8
    From my point of view, this doesnt solve all scenarios. Prior to MVC 6, I used a custom Authorize Attribute, to implement my own "Permission System". I could add the Authorize attribute to all actions, and pass one specific needed permission (as Enum-Value). The permission itself is was mapped to groups/users within the DB. So, I don't see a way to handle this with policies!? – Gerwald Jan 17 '16 at 9:22
  • 22
    I, like many others in these comments, am very disappointed that using attributes for authorization has been so greatly neutered over what was possible in Web API 2. Sorry guys, but your "requirement" abstraction fails to cover any case where we could previously use attribute constructor parameters to inform an underlying authorization algorithm. It used to be brain-dead simple to do something like [CustomAuthorize(Operator.And, Permission.GetUser, Permission.ModifyUser)]. I could use a single custom attribute in an infinite number of ways simply by modifying the constructor parameters. – NathanAldenSr Nov 14 '16 at 20:51
  • 27
    I am also shocked that the self-proclaimed "Lead ASP.NET security guy" is actually suggesting to use magic strings (hacking the meaning of IAuthorizeData.Policy) and custom policy providers to overcome this blatant oversight, rather than addressing it within the framework. I thought we weren't supposed to be creating our own implementations? You've left several of us no choice except to re-implement authorization from scratch (again), and this time without even the benefit of Web API's old Authorize attribute. Now we have to do it on the action filter or middleware level. – NathanAldenSr Nov 14 '16 at 20:54

It seems that with ASP.NET Core 2, you can again inherit AuthorizeAttribute, you just need to also implement IAuthorizationFilter:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class | AttributeTargets.Method, AllowMultiple = true, Inherited = true)]
public class CustomAuthorizeAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute, IAuthorizationFilter
{
    private readonly string _someFilterParameter;

    public CustomAuthorizeAttribute(string someFilterParameter)
    {
        _someFilterParameter = someFilterParameter;
    }

    public void OnAuthorization(AuthorizationFilterContext context)
    {
        var user = context.HttpContext.User;

        if (!user.Identity.IsAuthenticated)
        {
            // it isn't needed to set unauthorized result 
            // as the base class already requires the user to be authenticated
            // this also makes redirect to a login page work properly
            // context.Result = new UnauthorizedResult();
            return;
        }

        // you can also use registered services
        var someService = context.HttpContext.RequestServices.GetService<ISomeService>();

        var isAuthorized = someService.IsUserAuthorized(user.Identity.Name, _someFilterParameter);
        if (!isAuthorized)
        {
            context.Result = new StatusCodeResult((int)System.Net.HttpStatusCode.Forbidden);
            return;
        }
    }
}
  • So you can only use this to deny authorization, not grant it? – MEMark Aug 29 at 10:44
  • @MEMark By granting, you mean overriding another authorization attribute? – gius Aug 30 at 11:05
  • I guess you could put it like that. I mean effectively allowing access to the resource. – MEMark Aug 30 at 15:06
  • 1
    AFAIK, access is allowed by default, so you need to explicitly deny it (e.g., by adding an AuthorizeAttribute). Check this question for more details: stackoverflow.com/questions/17272422/… – gius Sep 3 at 10:08

What is the current approach to make a custom AuthorizeAttribute

Easy: don't create your own AuthorizeAttribute.

For pure authorization scenarios (like restricting access to specific users only), the recommended approach is to use the new authorization block: https://github.com/aspnet/MusicStore/blob/1c0aeb08bb1ebd846726232226279bbe001782e1/samples/MusicStore/Startup.cs#L84-L92

public class Startup
{
    public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {
        services.Configure<AuthorizationOptions>(options =>
        {
            options.AddPolicy("ManageStore", policy => policy.RequireClaim("Action", "ManageStore"));
        });
    }
}

public class StoreController : Controller
{
    [Authorize(Policy = "ManageStore"), HttpGet]
    public async Task<IActionResult> Manage() { ... }
}

For authentication, it's best handled at the middleware level.

What are you trying to achieve exactly?

  • I am receiving a session ID in the Header Authorization. From that ID I'll know whether a particular action is valid. – jltrem Jul 16 '15 at 21:09
  • Then that's not an authorization concern. I guess your "session ID" is actually a token containing the identity of the caller: this should definitely be done at the middleware level. – Pinpoint Jul 16 '15 at 21:12
  • 1
    It isn't authentication (establishing who the user is) but it is authorization (determining if a user should have access to a resource). So where are you suggesting I look to solve this? – jltrem Jul 16 '15 at 21:18
  • 2
    @jltrem, agreed, what you are talking about is authorization, not authentication. – Eric Burcham Jul 16 '15 at 21:21
  • 1
    @Pinpoint I am not. I query another system for that info. That system authenticates (determines the user) and authorizes (tells me what that user can access). Right now I have it hacked to work by calling a method in each controller action to have the other system verify the session. I'd like to have this automatically happen via an attribute. – jltrem Jul 16 '15 at 21:32

You can create your own AuthorizationHandler that will find custom attributes on your Controllers and Actions, and pass them to the HandleRequirementAsync method.

public abstract class AttributeAuthorizationHandler<TRequirement, TAttribute> : AuthorizationHandler<TRequirement> where TRequirement : IAuthorizationRequirement where TAttribute : Attribute
{
    protected override Task HandleRequirementAsync(AuthorizationHandlerContext context, TRequirement requirement)
    {
        var attributes = new List<TAttribute>();

        var action = (context.Resource as AuthorizationFilterContext)?.ActionDescriptor as ControllerActionDescriptor;
        if (action != null)
        {
            attributes.AddRange(GetAttributes(action.ControllerTypeInfo.UnderlyingSystemType));
            attributes.AddRange(GetAttributes(action.MethodInfo));
        }

        return HandleRequirementAsync(context, requirement, attributes);
    }

    protected abstract Task HandleRequirementAsync(AuthorizationHandlerContext context, TRequirement requirement, IEnumerable<TAttribute> attributes);

    private static IEnumerable<TAttribute> GetAttributes(MemberInfo memberInfo)
    {
        return memberInfo.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(TAttribute), false).Cast<TAttribute>();
    }
}

Then you can use it for any custom attributes you need on your controllers or actions. For example to add permission requirements. Just create your custom attribute.

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class | AttributeTargets.Method, AllowMultiple = true)]
public class PermissionAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute
{
    public string Name { get; }

    public PermissionAttribute(string name) : base("Permission")
    {
        Name = name;
    }
}

Then create a Requirement to add to your Policy

public class PermissionAuthorizationRequirement : IAuthorizationRequirement
{
    //Add any custom requirement properties if you have them
}

Then create the AuthorizationHandler for your custom attribute, inheriting the AttributeAuthorizationHandler that we created earlier. It will be passed an IEnumerable for all your custom attributes in the HandleRequirementsAsync method, accumulated from your Controller and Action.

public class PermissionAuthorizationHandler : AttributeAuthorizationHandler<PermissionAuthorizationRequirement, PermissionAttribute>
{
    protected override async Task HandleRequirementAsync(AuthorizationHandlerContext context, PermissionAuthorizationRequirement requirement, IEnumerable<PermissionAttribute> attributes)
    {
        foreach (var permissionAttribute in attributes)
        {
            if (!await AuthorizeAsync(context.User, permissionAttribute.Name))
            {
                return;
            }
        }

        context.Succeed(requirement);
    }

    private Task<bool> AuthorizeAsync(ClaimsPrincipal user, string permission)
    {
        //Implement your custom user permission logic here
    }
}

And finally, in your Startup.cs ConfigureServices method, add your custom AuthorizationHandler to the services, and add your Policy.

        services.AddSingleton<IAuthorizationHandler, PermissionAuthorizationHandler>();

        services.AddAuthorization(options =>
        {
            options.AddPolicy("Permission", policyBuilder =>
            {
                policyBuilder.Requirements.Add(new PermissionAuthorizationRequirement());
            });
        });

Now you can simply decorate your Controllers and Actions with your custom attribute.

[Permission("AccessCustomers")]
public class CustomersController
{
    [Permission("AddCustomer")]
    IActionResult AddCustomer([FromBody] Customer customer)
    {
        //Add customer
    }
}
  • I will take a look at this ASAP. – NathanAldenSr Nov 28 '16 at 2:33
  • 2
    This is quite overengineered... I solved the same using a simple AuthorizationFilterAttribute wich receives a parameter. You don't need reflection for this, it seems even more artificious than the "official" solution (that I find quite poor). – Vi100 Nov 28 '16 at 10:20
  • @Vi100 I couldn't find much information on AuthorizationFilters in ASP.NET Core. The official documentation page says they are currently working on this topic. docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/security/authorization/… – Shawn Nov 28 '16 at 21:13
  • @Vi100 Can you please share your solution, if there is a simpler way to achieve this I would love to know. – Shawn Nov 29 '16 at 2:55
  • 1
    One thing to note the use of UnderlyingSystemType above does not compile, but removing it seems to work. – teatime Jun 21 '17 at 12:54

Based on Derek Greer GREAT answer, i did it with enums.

Here is an example of my code:

public enum PermissionItem
{
    User,
    Product,
    Contact,
    Review,
    Client
}

public enum PermissionAction
{
    Read,
    Create,
}


public class AuthorizeAttribute : TypeFilterAttribute
{
    public AuthorizeAttribute(PermissionItem item, PermissionAction action)
    : base(typeof(AuthorizeActionFilter))
    {
        Arguments = new object[] { item, action };
    }
}

public class AuthorizeActionFilter : IAsyncActionFilter
{
    private readonly PermissionItem _item;
    private readonly PermissionAction _action;
    public AuthorizeActionFilter(PermissionItem item, PermissionAction action)
    {
        _item = item;
        _action = action;
    }
    public async Task OnActionExecutionAsync(ActionExecutingContext context, ActionExecutionDelegate next)
    {
        bool isAuthorized = MumboJumboFunction(context.HttpContext.User, _item, _action); // :)

        if (!isAuthorized)
        {
            context.Result = new UnauthorizedResult();

        }
        else
        {
            await next();
        }
    }
}

public class UserController : BaseController
{
    private readonly DbContext _context;

    public UserController( DbContext context) :
        base()
    {
        _logger = logger;
    }

    [Authorize(PermissionItem.User, PermissionAction.Read)]
    public async Task<IActionResult> Index()
    {
        return View(await _context.User.ToListAsync());
    }
}

protected by Community Jun 1 '16 at 17:42

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