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I'm using Python 2.7.6. I can't understand the following result from re.findall:

>>> re.findall('\d|\(\d,\d\)', '(6,7)')
['(6,7)']

I expected the above to return ['6', '7'], because according to the documentation:

'|'

A|B, where A and B can be arbitrary REs, creates a regular expression that will match either A or B. An arbitrary number of REs can be separated by the '|' in this way. This can be used inside groups (see below) as well. As the target string is scanned, REs separated by '|' are tried from left to right. When one pattern completely matches, that branch is accepted. This means that once A matches, B will not be tested further, even if it would produce a longer overall match. In other words, the '|' operator is never greedy. To match a literal '|', use \|, or enclose it inside a character class, as in [|].

Thanks for your help

  • 1
    n [4]: re.findall(r'\d|\d,\d\)', '(6,7)') Out[4]: ['6', '7'] Amazing what difference the ( makes, eh? It found a possible match for the second thing first, so that's what got matched. – NightShadeQueen Jul 16 '15 at 21:45
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    @hwnd The example is contrived, I'm trying to understand the expected behavior here. – Mayank Jul 16 '15 at 21:45
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    "REs separated by '|' are tried from left to right." Maybe this means from left to right in the string? In this case, the ( is more to the left than the first digit. – tobias_k Jul 16 '15 at 21:47
4

As mentioned in document :

This means that once A matches, B will not be tested further, even if it would produce a longer overall match.

So in this case regex engine doesn't match the \d because your string stars with ( and not \d so it will match the second case that is \(\d,\d\). But if your string stared with \d it would match \d :

>>> re.findall('\d|\d,\d\)', '6,7)')
['6', '7']
  • Comprehension dawns..:) Thanks. – Mayank Jul 16 '15 at 21:48
  • @Mayank Welcome! – Kasrâmvd Jul 16 '15 at 21:51

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