1

I have a project that takes time to load everything so I create a splash screen that tells the user through a progressbar how much time it will take to fully load and show the UI, but I'm facing a problem.

When I create my splash, this shows up correctly but then I create and initialize the Principal frame and everything freeze until this has fully load.

So, I try to load my Principal frame in a thread using SwingWorker (and it works) but after unknown NullPointerExceptions and reading a lot I found that this is a terrible idea because I am not creating my UI in the EDT, so here I am stuck.

I know that I must do Swing Calls in the Event Dispatch Thread (EDT) and non-swing heavy work in SwingWorkers but initialize the Swing Components of my Principal Frame are a heavy work too so, what should I do?

I have read some question here, specially this, and I think I get it but I have doubts. Taking that example:

SwingUtilities.invokeAndWait(new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
        new SplashScreen();
    }
});
// Code to start system (nothing that touches the GUI)
SwingUtilities.invokeAndWait(new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
        new MainFrame();
    }
});
//.. etc

And reading this site that says:

The Swing framework manages component drawing, updates, and event handlers on the EDT.

Is creating a new component a Swing Call? If it is, What should I do if new MainFrame() will take some time because the project has a lot of components to initialize?

How do I tell the Splash something like "Program loaded 50%"?

What does a Swing Call means and how can I do a correct use of invokeLater and SwingWorker? Maybe the solution is too obvious or have already an answer, but I can't see it and I apologize if this is the case.

Thanks!

  • 3
    You have a catch 22 problem. You need to find away to load as much of the none-visual content as possible outside of the EDT (using something like a SwingWorker). You can not guarantee when a component might become realised (attached to a native peer and hence start generating events) – MadProgrammer Jul 16 '15 at 23:15
3

You're on a right track. But don't use invokeAndWait (if you have to only) - use invokeLater:

invokeAndWait

Causes doRun.run() to be executed synchronously on the AWT event dispatching thread.

invokeLater

Causes doRun.run() to be executed asynchronously on the AWT event dispatching thread.

Consider that block wrapped doLater is run on EDT thread and code wrapped in doOutside is invoked in another thread (and that's why you don't block the UI):

EDIT:

As pointed out in the comments I add the explanations for the concepts I'll use.


doLater {
    // here goes the code
}

is a concept for:

SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
        // here goes the code
    }
});

And

doOutside {
    // here goes the code
}

is a concept for:

new Thread(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        // here goes the code
    }
}).start();

doLater {
    final MainFrame m = new MainFrame();
    doOutside {
        // handle heavy operation
        final int result = 1;
        doLater {
            m.setResult(result);
        }
    }
}

Conclusion: everything that touches Swing in some way must be run on EDT. If you want to update percentages:

doLater {
    final MainFrame m = new MainFrame();
    doOutside {
        // handle progress
        for(int i = 0; i < someSize; ++i) {
            final int progress = i;
            doLater {
                m.getProgressBar().setProgress(progress);
            }

        }
    }
}

I hope you understand the concept now. The SwingWorker just do exectly something as doOutside === doInBackground & doLater === done/progress

Btw. The code above is a real code: lookup Griffon framework in Groovy.

  • 3
    I personally feel that Groovy makes stuff like easier, but aren't you at least slightly worried that springing a new language on the OP might make this answer hard to follow, the question is after all tagged java – Jason Sperske Jul 16 '15 at 23:30
  • 2
    I agree with MadProgrammer. If new MainFrame() is really taking that long, then your best bet is to figure out what (non-visual) components you can move out, and call in a separate thread. Once the UI components are initialized (which should be able to happen very quickly), then you can easily display a visual "status bar" for any subsequent initialization. – paulsm4 Jul 16 '15 at 23:42
  • 2
    I also agree with Jason Sperske: Groovy is Good ... but the immediate problem is a Java problem - minimize the work needed to get your initial UI complete and your Event Loop running. – paulsm4 Jul 16 '15 at 23:47
  • 1
    The doLater and doOutside is just an abstraction of doInBackground & done - just to get the concept. It would be a really long code if I've written it in SwingWokers :) – Xeon Jul 16 '15 at 23:48
  • with MadProgrammer suggestion and your answers, I guess I'm now start to getting it. I'll do some test to learn how to separate swing and non-swing stuffs and then, try to apply this example. – Alex Sifuentes Jul 17 '15 at 0:01

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.