9

In Fortran there is a statement Implicit none that throws a compilation error when a local variable is not declared but used. I understand that Python is a dynamically typed language and the scope of a variable may be determined at runtime.

But I would like to avoid certain unintended errors that happen when I forget to initialize a local variable but use it in the main code. For example, the variable x in the following code is global even though I did not intend that:

def test():
    y=x+2  # intended this x to be a local variable but forgot
           # x was not initialized 
    print y


x=3
test() 

So my question is that: Is there any way to ensure all variables used in test() are local to it and that there are no side effects. I am using Python 2.7.x. In case there is a local variable, an error is printed.

9
  • 2
    "The determined Real Programmer can write FORTRAN programs in any language." Jul 17, 2015 at 3:36
  • 1
    It sounds like your question isn't about the "implicit none", but about whether any enforcement mechanism for this specific error exists -- a rather different question. Jul 17, 2015 at 3:44
  • Tell me a trick that makes it a compile time error.It need not be "implicit none". Jul 17, 2015 at 3:44
  • 1
    You mean something like putting try: x, except: pass, else: return in the function? Jul 17, 2015 at 3:53
  • Does a static checker that can be tuned to flag it count? Of the three static checkers available for Python, I'm pretty sure that two of them let you enforce a specific naming convention for module-scoped variables. Jul 17, 2015 at 3:55

8 Answers 8

8

So my question is that: Is there any way to ensure all variables used in test() are local to it and that there are no side effects.

There is a technique to validate that globals aren't accessed.

Here's a decorator that scans a function's opcodes for a LOAD_GLOBAL.

import dis, sys, re, StringIO

def check_external(func):
    'Validate that a function does not have global lookups'
    saved_stdout = sys.stdout
    sys.stdout = f = StringIO.StringIO()
    try:
        dis.dis(func)
        result = f.getvalue()
    finally:
        sys.stdout = saved_stdout
    externals = re.findall('^.*LOAD_GLOBAL.*$', result, re.MULTILINE)
    if externals:
        raise RuntimeError('Found globals: %r', externals)
    return func

@check_external
def test():
    y=x+2  # intended this x to be a local variable but forgot
           # x was not initialized
    print y

To make this practical, you will want a stop list of acceptable global references (i.e. modules). The technique can be extended to cover other opcodes such as STORE_GLOBAL and DELETE_GLOBAL.

All that said, I don't see straight-forward way to detect side-effects.

5
  • These do not catch what the OP is looking for.
    – brenns10
    Jul 17, 2015 at 4:11
  • Speak of hacks! I love that you redirected stdout just so you could capture the output of dis.dis. +1 😊 Jul 17, 2015 at 4:50
  • 1
    @RoshanMathews, where "you love" capturing the stdout of dis.dis, I ask myself, "what is wrong with the guys who wrote dis" =)
    – bgusach
    Jul 21, 2015 at 15:14
  • 1
    @ikaros45 FWIW, In Python 3, dis() grew an option to send the output to a file. The core devs were conservative and didn't grow the API until there was a feature request. This helps the language avoid hyper-generalization and feature creep. Also, in Python 3, I added contextlib.redirect_stdout() so that you can re-route the stdout of any function that uses print(). The latter is a completely general solution that doesn't entail API expansion for every tool that uses print() to meet its primary use case. Jul 21, 2015 at 22:15
  • 1
    @RaymondHettinger Those are valid reasons and I am aware that in the standard library the stability is sacred, but I still think coupling to stdout is a bad thing to do. If you decouple from the beginning the printing from the logic, you offer a better API (e.g. dis.get_dis_instructions, which would return a string, and for the normal use case dis.dis, which would just print the output of the former). The code would be even more testable.
    – bgusach
    Jul 22, 2015 at 6:54
3

There is no implicit None in the sense you mean. Assignment will create a new variable, thus a typo might introduce a new name into your scope.

One way to get the effect you want is to use the following ugly-ish hack:

def no_globals(func):
    if func.func_code.co_names:
        raise TypeError(
            'Function "%s" uses the following globals: %s' % 
            (func.__name__, ', '.join(func.func_code.co_names)))
    return func

So when you declare your function test–with the no_globals wrapper–you'll get an error, like so:

>>> @no_globals
... def test():
...     y = x + 2  # intended this x to be a local variable but forgot
...                # x was not initialized 
...     print y
... 
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 5, in no_globals
TypeError: Function "test" uses the following globals: x
>>> 
>>> x = 3
>>> test() 
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
NameError: name 'test' is not defined
4
  • 1
    While you get a +1 for an interesting solution, you simultaneously get a -1 for providing a learner with a dangerous tool, which if relied on, effectively breaks the language. Jul 17, 2015 at 4:04
  • 1
    Thank you for giving me a spear. I will fish with it only when necessary and not permanently embed it. Jul 17, 2015 at 4:09
  • 2
    Unfortunately, something like sys.stdout.write('blah') will cause this annotation to raise an error. sys, stdout, and write are all "globals".
    – brenns10
    Jul 17, 2015 at 4:10
  • 1
    Yes, to do this right you really need to scan the bytecode for LOAD_GLOBAL opcodes. Of course, modules, classes, and functions may all be "globals" and you'll usually want to be able to use them!
    – kindall
    Jul 17, 2015 at 5:55
0

Just avoid using globally-scoped variables at all. And if you must, prefix their names with something you'll never use in a local variable name.

4
  • not what I am looking for. The statement "x=3" wasn't intended to be global either. A mere prefix won't help Jul 17, 2015 at 3:53
  • You are not answering the question, he's asking if there is a way to avoid looking to names in the global namespace if they are not declared in local namespace.
    – jvdm
    Jul 17, 2015 at 4:00
  • 1
    What was the point of putting such a line at the global scope then? If you're asking if there exists a magic tool that can detect where you intended to indent code, the answer is unfortunately "no". Any feature that would detect the "flaw" in your example would render global variables impossible. Jul 17, 2015 at 4:00
  • @jvdm It's not that simple. Looking into outer scopes isn't just about globals. Consider nested functions for example. He's basically asking if there's a way to turn a fundamental part of the language off. Jul 17, 2015 at 4:01
0

If you were really worried about this, you could try the following:

def test():
    try:
        x
    except:
        pass
    else:
        return
    y = x+2
    print y

But I'd recommend simply being mindful when writing a function that you don't try to reference things before assigning them. If possible, try to test each function separately, with a variety of carefully-defined inputs and intended outputs. There are a variety of testing suites and strategies, not to mention the simple assert keyword.

2
  • In the function I used, I had 50 variables that could be inherited into a global scope. Cant do this for every time a variables is used. Jul 17, 2015 at 4:11
  • 1
    @CorruptedMyStack, that's why I said it's better to just be mindful of how you write your functions. Better still would be to not have globals, especially not 50 of them. That's almost guaranteed to be too messy to improve or debug. Jul 17, 2015 at 4:52
0

In Python, this is quite simply entirely legal. In fact, it is a strength of the language! This (lack) of error is the reason why you can do something like this:

def function1():
    # stuff here
    function2()

def function2():
    pass

Whereas in C, you would need to "forward declare" function2.

There are static syntax checkers (like flake8) for Python that do plenty of work to catch errors and bad style, but this is not an error, and it is not caught by such a checker. Otherwise, something like this would be an error:

FILENAME = '/path/to/file'
HOSTNAME = 'example.com'

def main():
    with open(FILENAME) as f:
        f.write(HOSTNAME)

Or, something even more basic like this would be an error:

import sys
def main():
    sys.stdout.write('blah')

The best thing you can do is use a different naming convention (like ALL_CAPS) for module level variable declarations. Also, make it a habit to put all of your code within a function (no module-level logic) in order to prevent variables from leaking into the global namespace.

0

Is there any way to ensure all variables used in test() are local to it and that there are no side effects.

No. The language offers no such functionality.

There is the built in locals() function. So you could write:

y = locals()['x'] + 2

but I cannot imagine anyone considering that to be an improvement.

0
0

To make sure the correct variable is used, you need to limit the scope of the lookup. Inside a function, Python will look to arguments defined in line, then to the args and kwargs. After those, its going to look outside the function. This can cause annoying bugs if the function depends on a global variable that gets changed elsewhere.

To avoid using a global variable by accident, you can define the function with a keyword argument for the variables your going to use:

def test(x=None):
    y=x+2  # intended this x to be a local variable but forgot
           # x was not initialized 
    print y

x=3
test() 

I'm guessing you don't want to do this for lots of variables. However, it will stop the function from using globals.

Actually, even if you want to use a global variable in the function, I think its best to make it explicit:

x = 2
def test(x=x):
    y=x+2  # intended this x to be a local variable but forgot
           # x was not initialized 
    print y
x=3
test() 

This example will use x=2 for the function no matter what happens to the global value of x afterwards. Inside the function, x is fixed to the value it had at compile time.

I started passing global variables as keyword arguments after getting burned a couple times. I think this is generally considered good practice?

0

The offered solutions are interesting, especially the one using dis.dis, but you are really thinking in the wrong direction. You don't want to write such a cumbersome code.

  • Are you afraid that you will reach a global accidentally? Then don't write globals. The purpose of module globals is mostly to be reached. (in a comment I have read that you have 50 globals in scope, which seems to me that you have some design errors).

  • If you still DO have to have globals, then either use a naming convention (UPPER_CASE is recommended for constants, which could cover your cases).

  • If a naming convention is not an option either, just put the functions you don't want to reach any global in a separate module, and do not define globals there. For instance, define pure_funcs and inside of that module, write your "pure" functions there, and then import this module. Since python has lexical scope, functions can only reach variables defined in outer scopes of the module they were written (and locals or built-ins, of course). Something like this:

    # Define no globals here, just the functions (which are globals btw)
    def pure1(arg1, arg2):
        print x  # This will raise an error, no way you can mix things up.
    

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