1

I am trying to increment a value in C and return the old value, and I am doing that using a pointer. The problem is that the new value is still 0 even though I am using pointer.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int increment (int *mem) {
    int tmp;
    tmp = *mem;
    *mem++;
    return tmp;
}

int main () {
    int a = 0;
    printf("The old value of a is \t %d", increment(&a));
    printf("The new value of a is \t %d", a);
}

Now when I run this method I get the same value for a that is 0; I was expecting 1 in the second printf. I don't know what I am doing wrong here.

  • 8
    try (*mem)++ then read about operator precedences – BeyelerStudios Jul 17 '15 at 12:59
  • 1
    You really should learn how to use the debugger, and enable all warnings & debug info in your compiler, and read more about C syntax. Don't write some syntax that you don't master (so add parenthesis as much as you want) – Basile Starynkevitch Jul 17 '15 at 13:01
  • yes you are right – Bionix1441 Jul 17 '15 at 13:01
  • 2
    BTW, I'm coding in C since the 1980s and I never code *mem++ because I find it so unreadable (so I code either *(mem++) or (*mem)++ or even mem[0]++....), even if it has some defined meaning – Basile Starynkevitch Jul 17 '15 at 13:17
  • 2
    ++*mem would work – aragaer Jul 17 '15 at 13:21
9

Change this

*mem++;

to this

(*mem)++;

The problem lies in the operators priority. You may want to read about C Operator precedence.


So, what does your code do? It increments the value of the pointer, since ++ operator is activated first and then * gets activated, having no real effect.

As a result, your code invokes undefined behavior, since you access (and eventually write) into an invalid memory location since the pointer is incremented before the value is written to it.

  • Meant to use the C version. I deleted it. Didn't notice your link. – csnate Jul 17 '15 at 13:06
  • 1
    IMO, you should mention that the OP's code invokes UB. – Spikatrix Jul 17 '15 at 13:06
  • Good idea @CoolGuy, since (s)he modifies the value of the pointer and the access it, right? That's what you mean or you had something else in mind? It's ok csnate. – gsamaras Jul 17 '15 at 13:07
  • 1
    Yes. The OP's code writes into an invalid memory location since the pointer is incremented before the value is written to it. – Spikatrix Jul 17 '15 at 13:09
  • Bravo @CoolGuy, that really improved the answer, thank you. If you want something else changed in the answer, let me know. – gsamaras Jul 17 '15 at 13:11
5

Maybe you missed some parentheses?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int increment (int *mem) {
    int tmp;
    tmp = *mem;
    (*mem)++; // problem was here.
    return tmp;
}

int main (){
    int a = 0;
    printf("The old value of a is \t %d", increment(&a));
    printf("The new value of a is \t %d", a);
}
  • 1
    Parentheses should be used for plural. Since I am Greek, I had to tell! :P By the way, +1 for the complete code. – gsamaras Jul 17 '15 at 13:12
0

In addition to what everyone else has posted about operator precedence, if you are passing in a pointer to an int to be incremented there is no reason to return a copy of the int via tmp. You will have access to the value in mem outside of the function.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void increment (int *mem) {
    (*mem)++;
}

int main () {
    int a = 0;
    printf("The old value of a is \t %d", a);
    increment(&a);
    printf("The new value of a is \t %d", a);
}

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