17

In my current job we are rewriting some code to Java 8. If you have code like this:

if(getApi() != null && getApi().getUser() != null 
     && getApi().getUser().getCurrentTask() != null)  
{
   getApi().getUser().getCurrentTask().pause();
}

you can simply rewrite it to

Optional.ofNullable(this.getApi())
.map(Api::getUser)
.map(User::getCurrentTask)
.ifPresent(Task::pause);

without changing code behaviour. but what if something in the middle can throw NPE because it is not checked to null?

for example:

if(getApi() != null && getApi().getUser() != null 
     && getApi().hasTasks())  
{
   getApi().getMasterUser(getApi().getUser()) //<- npe can be here
     .getCurrentTask().pause();
}

what is the best way to rewrite code like this using optionals?(it should work exactly the same and throw npe when getMasterUser(...) returns null)

UPD second example:

if(getApi()!=null && getApi.getUser() != null)
{
   if(getApi().getUser().getDepartment().getBoss() != null)// <- nre if department is null
     {
        getApi().getUser().getDepartment().getBoss().somefunc();
     }
 }

it has nullchecks for api, user, boss, but not department. how can it be made using optionals?

10
  • The first line of code has a bitwise AND, is that correct?
    – Mike
    Commented Jul 19, 2015 at 14:02
  • Of course it was mistake @Mike
    – maxpovver
    Commented Jul 19, 2015 at 14:26
  • 4
    It is by no means the same. Optional.ofNullable(this::getApi) doesn't even compile. To fix it, you'd need an explicit cast: Optional.ofNullable((Supplier<Api>) this::getApi), and if the actual getApi() method returned null, Optional.ofNullable(this.getApi()) would return false, while Optional.ofNullable((Supplier<Api>) this::getApi) would always return true, no matter the method's implementation.
    – fps
    Commented Jul 19, 2015 at 18:09
  • 1
    @FedericoPeraltaSchaffner thanks for info. Guides I used to follow seem to lie a little :)
    – maxpovver
    Commented Jul 19, 2015 at 18:19
  • 1
    orElseThrow() unwraps optional, so yo have to wrap it back into optional after and so makes code ugly imho @FedericoPeraltaSchaffner especially when there is more than one time you have to check it
    – maxpovver
    Commented Jul 19, 2015 at 18:40

3 Answers 3

7
if(getApi() != null && getApi().getUser() != null) {
    if(getApi().getUser().getDepartment().getBoss() != null) {
        getApi().getUser().getDepartment().getBoss().somefunc();
    }
}

One way of writing this with optionals is:

Optional.ofNullable(this.getApi())
    .map(Api::getUser)
    .map(user -> Objects.requireNonNull(user.getDepartment()))
    .map(Department::getBoss)
    .ifPresent(Boss::somefunc);

But this is error-prone because it requires the client to keep track of what is and isn't optional. A better way would be to make the api itself return an optional instead of a nullable value. Then the client code is:

this.getApi()
    .flatMap(Api::getUser)
    .map(user -> user.getDepartment().getBoss())
    .ifPresent(Boss::somefunc));

This would make it clearer in the api which values should be optional and make it a compile-time error to not handle them.

if(getApi() != null && getApi().getUser() != null && getApi().hasTasks()) {
    getApi().getMasterUser(getApi().getUser()).getCurrentTask().pause();
}

Here, you need access to api and user at the same time so you probably need to nest the lambdas:

getApi().filter(Api::hasTasks).ifPresent(api -> {
    api.getUser().ifPresent(user -> {
        api.getMasterUser(user).getCurrentTask().ifPresent(Task::pause);
    });
});
3
  • The second one looks quite close to what I need, but it requires to rewrite legacy code and all code that uses these functions, which is usually impossible. So there is noting like .mapStrict(map_func, error_func) that calls error_func if map_func was called and returned null?
    – maxpovver
    Commented Jul 19, 2015 at 18:58
  • 1
    @maxpovver I think the closest you get is: map(user -> Objects.requireNonNull(user.getDepartment())).
    – fgb
    Commented Jul 19, 2015 at 19:23
  • thanks. plz add code from comment to the answer so I can accept it. It's still not perfect because monad should check it, not the function that is applied to monad, but it's better than nothing.
    – maxpovver
    Commented Jul 19, 2015 at 19:30
3

For the second example (applicable to first as well), this is shorter and about as obvious as the longer version:

Optional.ofNullable(getApi())
.map(Api::getUser)
.flatMap(u -> Optional.ofNullable(u.getDepartment().getBoss()))
.ifPresent(Boss::somefunc);

It also relies on less API.

I would additionally like to comment on your "this breaks the monad pattern"—nothing here (including your solutions) breaks the monad pattern. It is fully expressible in terms of return and >>=. If anything, it is the ifPresent call which breaks it because it implies side-effects.

2

So the answer for the first example is

Optional.ofNullable(getApi())
.filter(Api::hasTasks)
.map(Api::getUser)
.map(u -> Objects.requireNonNull(getApi().getMasterUser(u)))//api won't be null here so no need to check it
.map(MasterUser::getCurrentTask)
.ifPresent(Task::pause);

and for second example:

Optional.ofNullable(getApi())
.map(Api::getUser)
.map(u -> Objects.requireNonNull(u.getDepartment()))
.map(Department::getBoss)
.ifPresent(Boss::somefunc);

So you have to change .map(class::func) to .map(o -> Objects.requireNonNull(o.func())) to make it throw NRE when needed.

It breaks monad pattern of course, but it is still better than no any solution

Correct me if I am wrong please.

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