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I know JVM uses stack and heap for allocation of memory for object reference, object value and memory for methods. But I am confused about the terminologies: METHOD AREA, HEAP and JAVA STACK and I have few question's.

  1. When we say "ClassName obj = new ClassName()", new creates an object on the HEAP(the instance variables and static variables too) and what is returned to the reference(obj)? Some people use to say it is CLASS TYPE, does it mean the hash code?

  2. When new creates the object on the heap, at the same time: i)the methods,corresponding to that object ii)local variables and iii)the reference to that object are stored as part of STACK( is it JAVA STACK?). If so, then what does METHOD AREA do? Or am I wrong?

  3. What is the amount of memory allocated for that object?
    i. for object reference
    ii. for object values(it depends on the local variables)
    iii. will there be a memory allocated to point the object's methods?( because the non-static members are not shared among the objects and a separate copy is maintained for each objects including the methods).

By the way, where does static methods are stored?

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    Static methods are stored in the PermGen section of the heap – Ankur Anand Jul 19 '15 at 13:24
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    Methods, whether instance methods or static methods, are the same for all the instance of the class. They belong to the class, not the instance. Memory is allocated for their code when the class is loaded. Not when an object is created. – JB Nizet Jul 19 '15 at 13:34
  • Thank you, it sounds bit clear to me now about the methods. By the way, where are the non-static methods stored? – user3511557 Jul 19 '15 at 13:39
  • @AvinashReddyPaduri Assuming that you are referring to the code of the method ..There is only one copy of each method per class, be the method static or non-static. That copy is put in the Permanent Generation area. – Ankur Anand Jul 19 '15 at 13:41
  • In the method area, which is part of the PermGen. – RealSkeptic Jul 19 '15 at 13:41
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When we say "ClassName obj = new ClassName()", new creates an object on the HEAP(the instance variables and static variables too) and what is returned to the reference(obj)? Some people use to say it is CLASS TYPE, does it mean the hash code?

Yes new creates Object on the HEAP. Heap is a memory place where the objects and its instance variable are stored. Not static variables since static variables doesn't belong to Object it belongs to class so are stored on PermGem Sections (class related data, not instance related).

What is Returned : the reference(pointer/memory address) i.e hashcode

When new creates the object on the heap, at the same time: i)the methods,corresponding to that object ii)local variables and iii)the reference to that object are stored as part of STACK( is it JAVA STACK?). If so, then what does METHOD AREA do? Or am I wrong?

since All threads share the same method area methods don't corresponds to Objects it belongs to class

what does METHOD AREA do :The method area stores per-class information, like Run Time Constant Pool, Method code, The method's return type (or void) etc

What is the amount of memory allocated for that object? i. for object reference ii. for object values(it depends on the local variables) iii. will there be a memory allocated to point the object's methods?( because the non-static members are not shared among the objects and a separate copy is maintained for each objects including the methods).

Amount of Memory for Object Reference: it depends as on many VMs the size of a reference is the native pointer size and for (iii) above point already cleared that

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I know JVM uses stack and heap for allocation of memory for object reference

correct.

object value

I assume you means the object's header and fields.

and memory for methods.

Methods are not stored in the heap, or stack. When you profiler the heap usage or set the maximum heap size, the use of methods makes no difference as they are not on the heap in the Oracle or OpenJDK JVM.

They are stored in the PermGen or MetaSpace or some other space depending on which JVM you are using.

But I am confused about the terminologies: METHOD AREA,

From Method Area in Java

The Java Virtual Machine has a method area that is shared among all Java Virtual Machine threads. The method area is analogous to the storage area for compiled code of a conventional language or analogous to the "text" segment in an operating system process. It stores per-class structures such as the run-time constant pool, field and method data, and the code for methods and constructors, including the special methods (§2.9) used in class and instance initialization and interface initialization.

HEAP

Shared space for storing objects. This is usually one continuous region of native memory managed by the JVM.

and JAVA STACK

The thread's stack which is actually a native thread stack on most JVM.

When we say "ClassName obj = new ClassName()", new creates an object on the HEAP(the instance variables and static variables too)

It might, but it can also eliminate the object with escape analysis, placing the fields on the stack, and possibly eliminating those.

and what is returned to the reference(obj)?

Correct, Java only has references and primitives (if you ignore the void type which is neither)

Some people use to say it is CLASS TYPE,

The reference is defined by giving the type of the reference which is a class or interface.

does it mean the hash code?

A hash code is a hash value for the object. It is not releated to anything else you have mentioned.

When new creates the object on the heap,

When you create a new object on the heap, you just create space for the header of the object (which points to the class and it's methods) and space for it's fields. (Those the JVM doesn't optimise away)

at the same time: i)the methods

The methods are loaded/compiled in various stages. The methods are loaded as they are needed for the first time and later if they are compiled.

corresponding to that object ii)local variables

Local variables are on the stack, not on the heap, not in the object.

iii)the reference to that object are stored as part of STACK( is it JAVA STACK?).

The Java Stack, is the Stack, is the native stack.

If so, then what does METHOD AREA do?

Store the code for the methods.

What is the amount of memory allocated for that object?

About 8-12 bytes per header, space for each primitive field and reference and alignment padding of 8 or 16 bytes (32 GB - 64 GB heaps).

i. for object reference

Typically this is 32-bit on 64-bit JVMs (With compressed oops). If you have more than 64 GB heap it will be 64 -bit.

ii. for object values(it depends on the local variables)

Local variables are on the heap not the object.

iii. will there be a memory allocated to point the object's methods?

Method memory usage is not visible to you. It is not on the heap, nor something you can measure on a per method basis. I don't know of a profiler which will even show you this.

( because the non-static members are not shared among the objects and a separate copy is maintained for each objects including the methods).

That sounds like an insane waste of space, and it is, which is why the JVM does do that. There is only one copy for a method, regardless of the number of instances.

By the way, where does static methods are stored?

With all the other methods. There is no difference between a static method and a non-static method except a non-static method must take an instance as it's first argument at the JVM level. (And there is a bit in the modifiers to say whether it is static or not)

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