5

I am sure this is a really stupid question, but when I pass an angle of 180 degrees into c/c++'s cos() and sin() functions I appear to receive an incorrect value. I know that it should be: sin of 0.0547 and cos of 0.99 but I get sin of 3.5897934739308216e-009 and cos of -1.00000

My code is:

double radians = DegreesToRadians( angle );
double cosValue = cos( radians );
double sinValue = sin( radians );

DegreesToRadians() is:

double DegreesToRadians( double degrees )
{ 
    return degrees * PI / 180; 
} 

Thank you :)

8
  • 3
    I know that it should be: sin of 0.0547 and cos of 0.99 More like "0 and -1".
    – deviantfan
    Jul 19, 2015 at 14:18
  • 3
    The sine of PI is 0, and the cosine is -1. That sounds like about what you got. Jul 19, 2015 at 14:18
  • 2
    " sin of 0.0547 and cos of 0.99" Huh? It should be exactly 0 and -1. Your code correctly derived that (up to rounding errors).
    – Baum mit Augen
    Jul 19, 2015 at 14:19
  • 1
    sin(pi degrees) and cos(pi degrees) are 0.0548 and 0.998 respectively. sin(pi radians) and cos(pi radians) are 0 and -1.
    – user12205
    Jul 19, 2015 at 14:34
  • 2
    This is a great question. Why would anybody downvote this? There is a bug in the standard library, and it was 'fixed' by the addition of the new __sinpi() and __cospi() functions. Nov 24, 2015 at 20:21

3 Answers 3

15

C/C++ provides sin(a), cos(a), tan(a), etc. functions that require a parameter with radian units rather than degrees. double DegreesToRadians(d) performs a conversion that is close but an approximate as the conversion results are rounded. Also machine M_PI is close, but not the same value as the the mathematical irrational π.

OP's code with 180 passed to DegreesToRadians(d) and then to sin()/cos() gives results that differ than expected due to rounding, finite precision of double() and possible a weak value for PI.

An improvement is to perform argument reduction in degrees before calling the trig function. The below reduces the angle first to a -45° to 45° range and then calls sin(). This will insure that large values of N in sind(90.0*N) --> -1.0, 0.0, 1.0. . Note: sind(360.0*N +/- 30.0) may not exactly equal +/-0.5. Some additional considerations needed.

#include <math.h>
#include <stdio.h>

static double d2r(double d) {
  return (d / 180.0) * ((double) M_PI);
}

double sind(double x) {
  if (!isfinite(x)) {
    return sin(x);
  }
  if (x < 0.0) {
    return -sind(-x);
  }
  int quo;
  double x90 = remquo(fabs(x), 90.0, &quo);
  switch (quo % 4) {
    case 0:
      // Use * 1.0 to avoid -0.0
      return sin(d2r(x90)* 1.0);
    case 1:
      return cos(d2r(x90));
    case 2:
      return sin(d2r(-x90) * 1.0);
    case 3:
      return -cos(d2r(x90));
  }
  return 0.0;
}

int main(void) {
  int i;
  for (i = -360; i <= 360; i += 15) {
    printf("sin()  of %.1f degrees is  % .*e\n", 1.0 * i, DBL_DECIMAL_DIG - 1,
        sin(d2r(i)));
    printf("sind() of %.1f degrees is  % .*e\n", 1.0 * i, DBL_DECIMAL_DIG - 1,
        sind(i));
  }
  return 0;
}

Output

sin()  of -360.0 degrees is   2.4492935982947064e-16
sind() of -360.0 degrees is  -0.0000000000000000e+00  // Exact

sin()  of -345.0 degrees is   2.5881904510252068e-01  // 76-68 = 8 away
//                            2.5881904510252076e-01
sind() of -345.0 degrees is   2.5881904510252074e-01  // 76-74 = 2 away

sin()  of -330.0 degrees is   5.0000000000000044e-01  // 44 away
//  0.5                       5.0000000000000000e-01
sind() of -330.0 degrees is   4.9999999999999994e-01  //  6 away

sin()  of -315.0 degrees is   7.0710678118654768e-01  // 68-52 = 16 away
// square root 0.5 -->        7.0710678118654752e-01
sind() of -315.0 degrees is   7.0710678118654746e-01  // 52-46 = 6 away

sin()  of -300.0 degrees is   8.6602540378443860e-01
sind() of -300.0 degrees is   8.6602540378443871e-01
sin()  of -285.0 degrees is   9.6592582628906842e-01
sind() of -285.0 degrees is   9.6592582628906831e-01
sin()  of -270.0 degrees is   1.0000000000000000e+00  // Exact
sind() of -270.0 degrees is   1.0000000000000000e+00  // Exact
...
15
  • @chux I assume "gives results that differ than expected" was intended to read "gives results that differ more than expected"?
    – njuffa
    Mar 3, 2017 at 4:04
  • @njuffa Good idea, could have said it that way It was a bit unclear of how close OP wanted. This answer shows how by using range reduction first on degrees, then conversion to radians, we can even do better and return the expected exact value with 180 degrees. Mar 3, 2017 at 4:31
  • @chux-ReinstateMonica , thank you very much for this code. Is the following one can be used for cos? double cosd(double x) { if (!isfinite(x)) { return cos(x); } //if (x < 0.0) { // return cosd(x); //} int quo; double x90 = remquo(fabs(x), 90.0, &quo); cout<<x90<<endl; cout<<quo<<"\t"<<quo%4<<endl; switch (quo % 4) { case 0: // Use * 1.0 to avoid -0.0 return cos(d2r(x90)); case 1: return -sin(d2r(x90)* 1.0); case 2: return -cos(d2r(x90) ); case 3: return sin(d2r(x90)* 1.0); } return 0.0; } Mar 17 at 0:20
  • Looks mostly OK.1) try negative values and x values very near cosd(x) nearly 0.0 2) Once fully tested, post your implementation on Code Review for a good review and let me know. Its been 7 years since this post - perhaps some news ideas. Mar 17 at 0:34
  • 1
    This function is far cleverer and higher quality than it looked to me at first. The first non-obvious thing, to me, is that remquo doesn't return the same as fmod(x,90), in the range [0,90), which would lead to accuracy problems; rather, it returns a number in [-45,45]. The resulting accuracy of your function meets the standards of a standard math library; that is, error within 1 or 2 ulps, on all arguments, I believe. Shockingly, it even works in the case that quo overflows an int, thanks to remquo's obscure contract in that case. It's spooky how well remquo() meets your needs here.
    – Don Hatch
    May 10 at 13:37
8

First of all, a cosine of 180 degrees should be equal to -1, so the result you got is right.

Secondly, you sometimes can't get exact values when using sin/cos/tan etc functions as you always get results that are the closest to the correct ones. In your case, the value you got from sin is the closest to zero.

The value of sin(PI) that you got differs from zero only in the 9th (!) digit after the floating point. 3.5897934739308216e-009 is almost equal to 0.000000004 and that's almost equal to zero.

1
  • Thank you, sorry I got the wrong end of the stick when it comes to conversion :( Jul 19, 2015 at 15:20
5

I have the same problem as the OP when converting app to 64-bit.
My solution is to use the new math.h functions __cospi() and __sinpi().
Performance is similar (even 1% faster) than cos() and sin().

//    cos(M_PI * -90.0 / 180.0)   returns 0.00000000000000006123233995736766
//__cospi(       -90.0 / 180.0)   returns 0.0, as it should
// #define degree2rad 3.14159265359/180
// #define degree2rad M_PI/ 180.0
// double rot = -degree2rad * ang;
// double sn = sin(rot);
// double cs = cos(rot);

double rot = -ang / 180.0;
double sn = __sinpi(rot);
double cs = __cospi(rot);

From math.h:

/*  __sinpi(x) returns the sine of pi times x; __cospi(x) and __tanpi(x) return
the cosine and tangent, respectively.  These functions can produce a more
accurate answer than expressions of the form sin(M_PI * x) because they
avoid any loss of precision that results from rounding the result of the
multiplication M_PI * x.  They may also be significantly more efficient in
some cases because the argument reduction for these functions is easier
to compute.  Consult the man pages for edge case details.                 */
1
  • Although using __sinpi(), __cospi() is a good idea to reduce error with a radian argument, ang / 180.0 itself injects rounding error for many values. So good idea for reducing error when the quotient of ang / 180.0 is exact, not so otherwise. Nov 27, 2020 at 19:18

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