10

I am trying to mock the times function from the JavaScript library Underscore.js.

This function accepts two syntaxes :

_.times(3, function(n) {
    console.log("hello " + n);
});

and

_(3).times(function(n) {
    console.log("hello " + n);
});

So far I succeeded to mock the first one by creating an _ object like this :

var _ = {
    times: function(reps, iteratee) {
        // a loop
    }
};

And the second syntax by creating an _ function which returns an object :

function _(n) {
    return {
        times: function(iteratee) {
            // a loop
        }
    };
}

But I can't use these 2 methods together. I need to find a way that will allow both syntaxes. Do you have any idea how I could use the _ character as an object as well as a function ?

3 Answers 3

5

You should be able to combine two syntaxes like this:

var _ = (function() {

    var times = function(n, iteratee) {
        // a loop
    };

    function _(n) {
        return {times: function(iteratee) {
            return times(n, iteratee);
        }}; // or shorter: {times: times.bind(null, n)}
    }

    _.times = times;

    return _;
})();

Here you benefit from the fact that functions are also objects and hence can have properties.

1
  • This is perfect if you add something like if(arguments.length > 1){ times(n, arguments[1]); } before the return inside function _(n) ... Jul 19, 2015 at 21:46
3

Functions are objects in Javascript, so you could just do something like this:

var _ = function(a,b) { /* ... */ };
_.times = _;
4
  • 1
    There's more to it than just this to make _(3).times(fn) work. You have to return an object from the function that both captures the 3 in instance data and the object has the .times() method on it.
    – jfriend00
    Jul 19, 2015 at 21:23
  • @jfriend00 You are correct, but it doesn't have to actually do any work if OP is just trying to mock it, right? Jul 19, 2015 at 21:25
  • The OP wants something that works. I think their term "mock" here means they want to copy the way .times() works.
    – jfriend00
    Jul 19, 2015 at 21:30
  • Thanks, this worked! (although I wrote a new function for _.times = . (And yes, by "mocking" I meant copy the way this function works ;-) )
    – Seeven
    Jul 19, 2015 at 21:37
0

You could extent the function after defining it. Try this:

function _(n) {
  return {
    times: function(iteratee) {
      while (n-- > 0)
        iteratee();
    }
  };
}

_.times = function(reps, iteratee) {
  while (reps-- > 0)
    iteratee();
};

function iter() {
  console.log('iter!');
}

_(3).times(iter);

console.log('----');

_.times(5, iter);

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