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I am looking at two scenarios building a model using scikit-learn and I can not figure out why one of them is returning a result that is so fundamentally different than the other. The only thing different between the two cases (that I know of) is that in one case I am one-hot-encoding the categorical variables all at once (on the whole data) and then splitting between training and test. In the second case I am splitting between training and test and then one-hot-encoding both sets based off of the training data.

The latter case is technically better for judging the generalization error of the process but this case is returning a normalized gini that is dramatically different (and bad - essentially no model) compared to the first case. I know the first case gini (~0.33) is in line with a model built on this data.

Why is the second case returning such a different gini? FYI The data set contains a mix of numeric and categorical variables.

Method 1 (one-hot encode entire data and then split) This returns: Validation Sample Score: 0.3454355044 (normalized gini).

from sklearn.cross_validation import StratifiedKFold, KFold, ShuffleSplit,train_test_split, PredefinedSplit
from sklearn.ensemble import RandomForestRegressor , ExtraTreesRegressor, GradientBoostingRegressor
from sklearn.linear_model import LogisticRegression
import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
from sklearn.feature_extraction import DictVectorizer as DV
from sklearn import metrics
from sklearn.preprocessing import StandardScaler
from sklearn.grid_search import GridSearchCV,RandomizedSearchCV
from sklearn.ensemble import RandomForestRegressor, ExtraTreesRegressor
from scipy.stats import randint, uniform
from sklearn.metrics import mean_squared_error
from sklearn.datasets import load_boston

def gini(solution, submission):
    df = zip(solution, submission, range(len(solution)))
    df = sorted(df, key=lambda x: (x[1],-x[2]), reverse=True)
    rand = [float(i+1)/float(len(df)) for i in range(len(df))]
    totalPos = float(sum([x[0] for x in df]))
    cumPosFound = [df[0][0]]
    for i in range(1,len(df)):
        cumPosFound.append(cumPosFound[len(cumPosFound)-1] + df[i][0])
    Lorentz = [float(x)/totalPos for x in cumPosFound]
    Gini = [Lorentz[i]-rand[i] for i in range(len(df))]
    return sum(Gini)

def normalized_gini(solution, submission):
    normalized_gini = gini(solution, submission)/gini(solution, solution)
    return normalized_gini

# Normalized Gini Scorer
gini_scorer = metrics.make_scorer(normalized_gini, greater_is_better = True)



if __name__ == '__main__':

    dat=pd.read_table('/home/jma/Desktop/Data/Kaggle/liberty/train.csv',sep=",")
    y=dat[['Hazard']].values.ravel()
    dat=dat.drop(['Hazard','Id'],axis=1)


    folds=train_test_split(range(len(y)),test_size=0.30, random_state=15) #30% test

    #First one hot and make a pandas df
    dat_dict=dat.T.to_dict().values()
    vectorizer = DV( sparse = False )
    vectorizer.fit( dat_dict )
    dat= vectorizer.transform( dat_dict )
    dat=pd.DataFrame(dat)


    train_X=dat.iloc[folds[0],:]
    train_y=y[folds[0]]
    test_X=dat.iloc[folds[1],:]
    test_y=y[folds[1]]


    rf=RandomForestRegressor(n_estimators=1000, n_jobs=1, random_state=15)
    rf.fit(train_X,train_y)
    y_submission=rf.predict(test_X)
    print("Validation Sample Score: {:.10f} (normalized gini).".format(normalized_gini(test_y,y_submission)))

Method 2 (first split and then one-hot encode) This returns: Validation Sample Score: 0.0055124452 (normalized gini).

from sklearn.cross_validation import StratifiedKFold, KFold, ShuffleSplit,train_test_split, PredefinedSplit
from sklearn.ensemble import RandomForestRegressor , ExtraTreesRegressor, GradientBoostingRegressor
from sklearn.linear_model import LogisticRegression
import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
from sklearn.feature_extraction import DictVectorizer as DV
from sklearn import metrics
from sklearn.preprocessing import StandardScaler
from sklearn.grid_search import GridSearchCV,RandomizedSearchCV
from sklearn.ensemble import RandomForestRegressor, ExtraTreesRegressor
from scipy.stats import randint, uniform
from sklearn.metrics import mean_squared_error
from sklearn.datasets import load_boston

def gini(solution, submission):
    df = zip(solution, submission, range(len(solution)))
    df = sorted(df, key=lambda x: (x[1],-x[2]), reverse=True)
    rand = [float(i+1)/float(len(df)) for i in range(len(df))]
    totalPos = float(sum([x[0] for x in df]))
    cumPosFound = [df[0][0]]
    for i in range(1,len(df)):
        cumPosFound.append(cumPosFound[len(cumPosFound)-1] + df[i][0])
    Lorentz = [float(x)/totalPos for x in cumPosFound]
    Gini = [Lorentz[i]-rand[i] for i in range(len(df))]
    return sum(Gini)

def normalized_gini(solution, submission):
    normalized_gini = gini(solution, submission)/gini(solution, solution)
    return normalized_gini

# Normalized Gini Scorer
gini_scorer = metrics.make_scorer(normalized_gini, greater_is_better = True)



if __name__ == '__main__':

    dat=pd.read_table('/home/jma/Desktop/Data/Kaggle/liberty/train.csv',sep=",")
    y=dat[['Hazard']].values.ravel()
    dat=dat.drop(['Hazard','Id'],axis=1)


    folds=train_test_split(range(len(y)),test_size=0.3, random_state=15) #30% test

    #first split
    train_X=dat.iloc[folds[0],:]
    train_y=y[folds[0]]
    test_X=dat.iloc[folds[1],:]
    test_y=y[folds[1]]

    #One hot encode the training X and transform the test X
    dat_dict=train_X.T.to_dict().values()
    vectorizer = DV( sparse = False )
    vectorizer.fit( dat_dict )
    train_X= vectorizer.transform( dat_dict )
    train_X=pd.DataFrame(train_X)

    dat_dict=test_X.T.to_dict().values()
    test_X= vectorizer.transform( dat_dict )
    test_X=pd.DataFrame(test_X)


    rf=RandomForestRegressor(n_estimators=1000, n_jobs=1, random_state=15)
    rf.fit(train_X,train_y)
    y_submission=rf.predict(test_X)
    print("Validation Sample Score: {:.10f} (normalized gini).".format(normalized_gini(test_y,y_submission)))

2 Answers 2

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While the previous comments correctly suggest it is best to map over your entire feature space first, in your case both the Train and Test contain all of the feature values in all of the columns.

If you compare the vectorizer.vocabulary_ between the two versions, they are exactly the same, so there is no difference in mapping. Hence, it cannot be causing the problem.

The reason Method 2 fails is because your dat_dict gets re-sorted by the original index when you execute this command.

dat_dict=train_X.T.to_dict().values()

In other words, train_X has a shuffled index going into this line of code. When you turn it into a dict, the dict order re-sorts into the numerical order of the original index. This causes your Train and Test data become completely de-correlated with y.

Method 1 doesn't suffer from this problem, because you shuffle the data after the mapping.

You can fix the issue by adding a .reset_index() both times you assign the dat_dict in Method 2, e.g.,

dat_dict=train_X.reset_index(drop=True).T.to_dict().values()

This ensures the data order is preserved when converting to a dict.

When I add that bit of code, I get the following results:
- Method 1: Validation Sample Score: 0.3454355044 (normalized gini)
- Method 2: Validation Sample Score: 0.3438430991 (normalized gini)

1
  • 2
    It was pointed out to me that reset_index should include drop=True so that the dictionary doesn't include the index information. I've updated the code to reflect this, although it doesn't change the result. Without the drop=True, the dat_dict does include the index information, but it doesn't get mapped to anything because there is no column in train_X named index.
    – inversion
    Aug 7, 2015 at 23:03
3

I can't get your code to run, but my guess is that in the test dataset either

  • you're not seeing all the levels of some of the categorical variables, and hence if you calculate your dummy variables just on this data, you'll actually have different columns.
  • Otherwise, maybe you have the same columns but they're in a different order?
2
  • This. Any encoding done on the validation or test set must be the same encoding done on the training set. Jul 20, 2015 at 4:07
  • The dictionary vectorizer doesn't just utilize the training set to define dummy variables and then applies those "rules" to a test set?
    – B_Miner
    Jul 20, 2015 at 13:45

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