2

I was trying to clarify difference between Java's URLEncoder.encode(), Javascript's encodeURI(), encodeURIComponent(), and Android's Uri.encode().

It looks like this:

  • Alphabets and numbers
    • Everyone keeps
  • .-*_
    • Everyone keeps
  • !~'()
    • URLEncoder.encode() encodes, others keep
  • ,/?:@&=+$#
    • encodeURI() keeps, others encode
  • Space
    • + for URLEncoder.encode(), %20 for others

It seems like URLEncoder.encode() and encodeURIComponent() behaves the same. Am I correct, or in fact they also have some difference?

5

Interesting question. I just ran some code to test this:

Javascript encodeURI

encodeURI escapes all characters except:

Not Escaped: A-Z a-z 0-9 ; , / ? : @ & = + $ - _ . ! ~ * ' ( ) #

Code:

var sb = [];
for(var i=0;i<256;++i)
{
    var encoded = encodeURI(String.fromCharCode(i));
    if(encoded.indexOf('%') !== 0 && !encoded.match(/^[a-zA-Z0-9]+$/))
    {
        sb.push(encoded);
    }
}
alert(sb.join(' '));

Result:

! # $ & ' ( ) * + , - . / : ; = ? @ _ ~

Javascript encodeURIComponent

encodeURIComponent escapes all characters except:

Not Escaped: A-Z a-z 0-9 - _ . ! ~ * ' ( )

Code:

var sb = [];
for(var i=0;i<256;++i)
{
    var encoded = encodeURIComponent(String.fromCharCode(i));
    if(encoded.indexOf('%') !== 0 && !encoded.match(/^[a-zA-Z0-9]+$/))
    {
        sb.push(encoded);
    }
}
alert(sb.join(' '));

Result:

! ' ( ) * - . _ ~

Java URLEncoder.encode

Translates a string into application/x-www-form-urlencoded format using a specific encoding scheme. This method uses the supplied encoding scheme to obtain the bytes for unsafe characters.

Code:

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    try
    {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        for(int i=0;i<256;++i)
        {
            String encoded = URLEncoder.encode(String.valueOf((char) i), "UTF-8");
            if(!encoded.startsWith("%") && !encoded.matches("^[a-zA-Z0-9]+$"))
            {
                sb.append(' ').append(encoded);
            }
        }
        System.out.println(sb.substring(1));
    }
    catch(Exception e){}
}

Result:

Note that + is actually a whitespace.

+ * - . _

Android Uri.encode

Encodes characters in the given string as '%'-escaped octets using the UTF-8 scheme. Leaves letters ("A-Z", "a-z"), numbers ("0-9"), and unreserved characters ("_-!.~'()*") intact. Encodes all other characters.

Code:

try
{
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    for(int i=0;i<256;++i)
    {
        String encoded = Uri.encode(String.valueOf((char) i));
        if(!encoded.startsWith("%") && !encoded.matches("^[a-zA-Z0-9]+$"))
        {
            sb.append(' ').append(encoded);
        }
    }
    System.out.println(sb.substring(1));
}
catch(Exception e){}

Result:

! ' ( ) * - . _ ~
  • So the equivalent of encodeURIComponent() is Android's Uri.encode(), right? – Hai Zhang Nov 27 '17 at 0:14
  • 1
    Yes, I added documentation to the answer. They both encode all characters except for a certain list, which is equivalent for both functions. – Yeti Nov 28 '17 at 10:37

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