40

One of my tables have a unique key and when I try to insert a duplicate record it throws an exception as expected. But I need to distinguish unique key exceptions from others, so that I can customize the error message for unique key constraint violations.

All the solutions I've found online suggests to cast ex.InnerException to System.Data.SqlClient.SqlException and check the if Number property is equal to 2601 or 2627 as follows:

try
{
    _context.SaveChanges();
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    var sqlException = ex.InnerException as System.Data.SqlClient.SqlException;

    if (sqlException.Number == 2601 || sqlException.Number == 2627)
    {
        ErrorMessage = "Cannot insert duplicate values.";
    }
    else
    {
        ErrorMessage = "Error while saving data.";
    }
}

But the problem is, casting ex.InnerException to System.Data.SqlClient.SqlException causes invalid cast error since ex.InnerException is actually type of System.Data.Entity.Core.UpdateException, not System.Data.SqlClient.SqlException.

What is the problem with the code above? How can I catch Unique Key Constraint violations?

55

With EF6 and the DbContext API (for SQL Server), I'm currently using this piece of code:

try
{
  // Some DB access
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
  HandleException(ex);
}

public virtual void HandleException(Exception exception)
{
  if (exception is DbUpdateConcurrencyException concurrencyEx)
  {
    // A custom exception of yours for concurrency issues
    throw new ConcurrencyException();
  }
  else if (exception is DbUpdateException dbUpdateEx)
  {
    if (dbUpdateEx.InnerException != null
            && dbUpdateEx.InnerException.InnerException != null)
    {
      if (dbUpdateEx.InnerException.InnerException is SqlException sqlException)
      {
        switch (sqlException.Number)
        {
          case 2627:  // Unique constraint error
          case 547:   // Constraint check violation
          case 2601:  // Duplicated key row error
                      // Constraint violation exception
            // A custom exception of yours for concurrency issues
            throw new ConcurrencyException();
          default:
            // A custom exception of yours for other DB issues
            throw new DatabaseAccessException(
              dbUpdateEx.Message, dbUpdateEx.InnerException);
        }
      }

      throw new DatabaseAccessException(dbUpdateEx.Message, dbUpdateEx.InnerException);
    }
  }

  // If we're here then no exception has been thrown
  // So add another piece of code below for other exceptions not yet handled...
}

As you mentioned UpdateException, I'm assuming you're using the ObjectContext API, but it should be similar.

  • After checking out the code you shared, I can now see that the problem with my code is so obvious. I should write "ex.InnerException.InnerException as SqlException" instead of "ex.InnerException as SqlException". – Sinan ILYAS Jul 20 '15 at 12:42
  • 1
    Is there a way to detect also on which column violation occurred? There may be multiple unique keys in one table... – Learner Nov 25 '15 at 13:55
  • @Learner The only way I can think of would be to parse the error message (which states the name of the constraint / column), but it wouldn't be a very good solution (error messages might be updated in the future, and more important, are translated in multiple languages) – ken2k Nov 25 '15 at 14:07
  • Yeah, I thought so... Hopefully they won't translate my unique key name :)... I was thinking to try searching the unique key names inside error message. But is true that it might disappear completely with the new versions... Thanks... Maybe I should stick to "check before operation" – Learner Nov 25 '15 at 14:15
  • Along the same lines as this answer is this interesting blog – GDS Aug 11 '16 at 3:27
9

In my case, I'm using EF 6 and decorated one of the properties in my model with:

[Index(IsUnique = true)]

To catch the violation I do the following, using C# 7, this becomes much easier:

protected async Task<IActionResult> PostItem(Item item)
{
  _DbContext.Items.Add(item);
  try
  {
    await _DbContext.SaveChangesAsync();
  }
  catch (DbUpdateException e)
  when (e.InnerException?.InnerException is SqlException sqlEx && 
    (sqlEx.Number == 2601 || sqlEx.Number == 2627))
  {
    return StatusCode(StatusCodes.Status409Conflict);
  }

  return Ok();
}

Note, that this will only catch unique index constraint violation.

5
// put this block in your loop
try
{
   // do your insert
}
catch(SqlException ex)
{
   // the exception alone won't tell you why it failed...
   if(ex.Number == 2627) // <-- but this will
   {
      //Violation of primary key. Handle Exception
   }
}

EDIT:

You could also just inspect the message component of the exception. Something like this:

if (ex.Message.Contains("UniqueConstraint")) // do stuff
  • 3
    Unfortunately, catch(SqlException ex) doesn't catch the Unique Key violation exception and throws this error: An exception of type 'System.Data.Entity.Infrastructure.DbUpdateException' occurred in EntityFramework.dll but was not handled in user code – Sinan ILYAS Jul 20 '15 at 12:47
  • 1
    what error? and second one with if condition? – DeshDeep Singh Jul 20 '15 at 12:48
  • Inspecting "UniqueConstraint" in the error message should work, but it doesn't seem to be the best approach. – Sinan ILYAS Jul 20 '15 at 12:48
3

If you want to catch unique constraint

try { 
   // code here 
} 
catch(Exception ex) { 
   //check for Exception type as sql Exception 
   if(ex.GetBaseException().GetType() == typeof(SqlException)) { 
     //Violation of primary key/Unique constraint can be handled here. Also you may //check if Exception Message contains the constraint Name 
   } 
}
3
try
{
   // do your insert
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
   if (ex.GetBaseException().GetType() == typeof(SqlException))
   {
       Int32 ErrorCode = ((SqlException)ex.InnerException).Number;
       switch(ErrorCode)
       {
          case 2627:  // Unique constraint error
              break;
          case 547:   // Constraint check violation
              break;
          case 2601:  // Duplicated key row error
              break;
          default:
              break;
        }
    }
    else
    {
       // handle normal exception
    }
}
  • 1
    I like the fact that this adds the extra error code and the switch makes the code look cleaner, but I think there's a small error where you cast the InnerException to ErrorCode. I think you want to call GetBaseException() instead of using InnerException. – Steve Haselschwerdt Sep 11 '18 at 12:22
  • Also, this swallows all SqlException types instead of just the unique key violations. I think your default case should probably rethrow. – Steve Haselschwerdt Sep 11 '18 at 12:25

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