-2

I have Page_Load event on an .aspx markup page and a.aspx.cs code-behind file.

When running the application only the markup Page_Load event will fire, rather than both the markup and the code-behind methods. Why does the markup version fire rather than the code-behind version?

Example markdown:

 <script runat="server">
    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {

    }

</script>

Example code behind:

public partial class WebForms : System.Web.UI.Page
{
    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {

    }

}
4

There's two aspects to this question:

  • Why does any event launch without any manual event registration?
  • Why does only the ASPX event launch, and not the code-behind?

The first is basically a backwards compatibility thing related to the way the old ASP works. To make sure it's not too hard to convert existing ASP applications to ASP.NET, the ASP.NET runtime examines all public and protected methods on the class representing the page for a known naming pattern - in this case, it knows that Page_Load should be automatically wired to the Page.Load event.

The second has to do with how inheritance works, and how ASP.NET exploits inheritance. The usual ASP.NET page you make consists of two files - aspx and aspx.cs (for C#). The C# file is a C# source file as any other - it simply defines a class that inherits from Page (by default). The ASPX file, on the other hand, serves as a template to auto-generate another C# file - which defines a class that inherits from the code-behind class.

Thus, in your sample, you have a method called Page_Load in the code-behind class, and another in the ASPX class. Since the method isn't virtual, the ASPX one simply hides the other method in the code-behind. When the ASP.NET runtime comes looking for event handlers to auto-wire, it only sees one Page_Load - the one in the ASPX.

One way to go around this would be to use this code in code-behind:

 protected virtual Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
 {
   Response.Write("I'm in code-behind!");
 }

And this in ASPX:

 protected override Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
 {
   base.Page_Load(sender, e);

   Response.Write("I'm in ASPX!");
 }

Again, the runtime will wire-up just one Page_Load method - but thanks to the use of base.Page_Load, we ensure the overriden method gets called as well (note that you don't even need the method to be virtual for this, but there's a lot of good reasons to do that anyway).

-2

The Page_Load subroutine runs EVERY time the page is loaded. If you want to execute the code in the Page_Load subroutine only the FIRST time the page is loaded, you can use the Page.IsPostBack property. If the Page.IsPostBack property is false, the page is loaded for the first time, if it is true, the page is posted back to the server (i.e. from a button click on a form)

  • This doesn't answer the question. The question asks "why does one of the event handlers fire and not the other", but your solution covers if you want to run the same method multiple times. – gunr2171 Jul 20 '15 at 14:25
  • The question was not very much clear to me when i answered the question.But now it is. – Osama Aftab Jul 20 '15 at 15:11

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.