2

GPU: GeForce GTX 750

CPU: Intel i5-4440 3.10 GHz

Here is a simple C++ code I'm running.

    #include <iostream>
    #include "opencv2/highgui/highgui.hpp"
    #include "opencv2\gpu\gpu.hpp"

    int main(int argc, char** argv) {
        cv::Mat img0 = cv::imread("IMG_0984.jpg", CV_LOAD_IMAGE_GRAYSCALE); // Size 3264 x 2448
        cv::Mat img0Blurred;

        cv::gpu::GpuMat gpuImg0(img0);
        cv::gpu::GpuMat gpuImage0Blurred;

        int64 tickCount;

        for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
        {
            tickCount = cv::getTickCount();
            cv::blur(img0, img0Blurred, cv::Size(7, 7));
            std::cout << "CPU Blur " << (cv::getTickCount() - tickCount) / cv::getTickFrequency() << std::endl;

            tickCount = cv::getTickCount();
            cv::gpu::blur(gpuImg0, gpuImage0Blurred, cv::Size(7, 7));
            std::cout << "GPU Blur " << (cv::getTickCount() - tickCount) / cv::getTickFrequency() << std::endl;

        }

        cv::gpu::DeviceInfo deviceInfo;
        std::cout << "Device Info: "<< deviceInfo.name() << std::endl;

        std::cin.get();

        return 0;
    }

And as a result, I am usually getting something like this:

CPU Blur: 0.01
GPU Blur: 1.7
CPU Blur: 0.009
GPU Blur: 0.012
CPU Blur: 0.009
GPU Blur: 0.013
CPU Blur: 0.01
GPU Blur: 0.012
CPU Blur: 0.009
GPU Blur: 0.013

Device Info: GeForce GTX 750

So the first operation on GPU takes time.

But still, what about the rest of the GPU calls?

How come the GPU does not provide any acceleration for this. It is a big image after all (3264 x 2448). And the task is nice for parallelization, is it not?

Is my CPU that good, or is my GPU that bad? Or is this some kind of communication problem between components?

2

1 Answer 1

6

Your first gpu measurement is far from the others,i've experienced the same thing. The first call to an opencv kernel (erode/dilate/etc...) is longer than the others following. In an application, while we initializes GPU memory, we have made a first call to cv::gpu::XX in order to not having this measurement noise.

I've also seen that cv::gpu uses cudaDeviceSynchronize after each calls without an cv::gpu::Stream parameter. This can be long and cause you noisy measurements. Then opencv probably allocates memory for a temporary buffer to store the kernel you use to blur the image.

I don't see the allocation of gpuImage0Blurred in your example, can you be sure that your destination image is correctly allocated outside the loop, else you'll too measure the allocation time for this matrix.

Using nvvp can give you clues of what is really happening when your application runs to remove unnecessary operations.

EDIT:

#include <iostream>
#include "opencv2/highgui/highgui.hpp"
#include "opencv2\gpu\gpu.hpp"


int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    cv::Mat img0 = cv::imread("IMG_0984.jpg", CV_LOAD_IMAGE_GRAYSCALE); // Size 3264 x 2448
    cv::Mat img0Blurred;


    cv::gpu::GpuMat gpuImg0;
    cv::gpu::Stream stream;
    stream.enqueueUpload(img0, gpuImg0);
    stream.waitForCompletion();

    // allocates the matrix outside the loop
    cv::gpu::GpuMat gpuImage0Blurred( gpuImg0.size(), gpuImg0.type() );

    int64 tickCount;

    for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {
        tickCount = cv::getTickCount();
        cv::blur(img0, img0Blurred, cv::Size(7, 7));
        std::cout << "CPU Blur " << (cv::getTickCount() - tickCount) / cv::getTickFrequency() << std::endl;

        tickCount = cv::getTickCount();
        cv::gpu::blur(gpuImg0, gpuImage0Blurred, cv::Size(7, 7), cv::Point(-1, -1), stream);
        // ensure operations are finished  before measuring time spent doing operations
        stream.WaitCompletion();
        std::cout << "GPU Blur " << (cv::getTickCount() - tickCount) / cv::getTickFrequency() << std::endl;

    }

    std::cin.get();

    return 0;
}

Yes, it turns out waitForCompletion makes all the difference. I am getting the same values like in the beginning:

CPU Blur: 0.01
GPU Blur: 1.7
CPU Blur: 0.009
GPU Blur: 0.012
CPU Blur: 0.009
GPU Blur: 0.013
CPU Blur: 0.01
GPU Blur: 0.012
CPU Blur: 0.009
GPU Blur: 0.013
5
  • This is cool, but now I am facing a different problem. I was using blurring only as a simple benchmark. I actually wanted to parallelize feature detection. So, that is in my next question: stackoverflow.com/questions/31536735/…
    – ancajic
    Jul 21, 2015 at 10:56
  • u still not allocates your output matrix outside of the loop, just declaring the variable, cv::gpu::GpuMat gpuImage0Blurred(gpuImg0.size(), gpuImg0.type() ); will do the allocation on device, else your first call to blur will allocate this bufer
    – X3liF
    Jul 21, 2015 at 11:53
  • 1
    i've updated the edit, adding an synchronisation on the stream before measuring time, because you'll only measure the time spent to add order into the stream, not the compute time spent.
    – X3liF
    Jul 21, 2015 at 12:02
  • 1
    My computing time using GTX 770 and a corei7 using opencv 2.4 CPU Blur 0.0467963 GPU Blur 0.25968 CPU Blur 0.0125604 GPU Blur 0.00665776 CPU Blur 0.0124044 GPU Blur 0.00666265 CPU Blur 0.0126354 GPU Blur 0.00666472 CPU Blur 0.0132325 GPU Blur 0.00665901 Your GPU is the limiting factor, surely due to it's bad memory speed (80GB/sec according to NVidia specs) wich is around only 2 times your RAM output.
    – X3liF
    Jul 21, 2015 at 13:18
  • Wow... thank you. Having a completely independent measurements really helps. I am trying to get some sense out of all this. I keep reading how GPU processing increases speed for these kind of operations 10 times or more. So when I first got these results, I thought I was doing something wrong.
    – ancajic
    Jul 21, 2015 at 13:43

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.