7

I wanted to compare the speeds of printf and cout in C++ using this code for cout:

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 150000; i++)
        std::cout << "Hello!";
}

and this code for printf:

#include <cstdio>

int main()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 150000; i++)
        std::printf("Hello!");
}

I ran both programs many times and this is the result (with g++ compiler):

cout: 17.116 s

printf: 9.153 s

So printf is two times faster than cout. I searched in Stack Overflow for the reasons behind this behavior and I found that printf is faster than cout because its a function while cout is an object. But I also learned that cout is slower because it's synchronized with the standard C streams.

So what I did next is to turn off synchronization of all the iostream standard streams with their corresponding standard C streams with this code:

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::ios_base::sync_with_stdio(false);
    for (int i = 0; i < 150000; ++i)
        std::cout << "Hello!";
}

And surprisingly this is what I got:

printf: 9.153 s

cout with sync on: 17.116 s

cout with sync off: 1.146 s

WOW! It's a huge difference!

So my question is: would it be a good practice to always turn off the synchronization?

Thanks in advance.

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  • 2
    Is printing to the standard output the main part of your program? Then yes, it's probably a good idea,
    – Kerrek SB
    Jul 20, 2015 at 19:16
  • 7
    "Would it be a good practice to always …". No, regardless how the question ends, there is never a solution that is always right.
    – kay
    Jul 20, 2015 at 19:18
  • 1
    A few comments : such timings strongly depend on 1) what the standard output is plugged to 2) the platform 3) the standard library implementation. Also, you don't always have the choice to turn off the synchronization (it has to be done at the beginning of the program, for instance). And synchronization with C streams can also be a good feature to have, especially if you call into C libraries performing IO. Jul 20, 2015 at 19:18
  • 2
    FYI if you turn off synchronization then cout is no longer thread safe. Jul 20, 2015 at 19:23
  • 7
    " found that print() is faster than cout because its a function while cout is an object." I'd appreciate if you could link to the place on SO where you've read that. It sounds quite ... surprising. Also have you compiled with optimizations? Which compiler, platform?
    – dyp
    Jul 20, 2015 at 19:37

1 Answer 1

1

It Depends on if you're expected output has to be in order or not. And if you're mixing C-style or other output using the output stream. You do not want to ALWAYS turn off synchronization.

You DO NOT want to turn it off when.

  1. You are mixing Cout with other stream output functions. Like, scanf/printf, gets/puts, getchar/putchar ... ) with C++-style IO (cin/cout ... )[1]

  2. You are using threads with output that you want good output. "Concurrently accessing synchronized streams (i.e., streams for which this function returns true) never introduces data races: characters are read/written individually, although with no further guarantees on its order between threads. This may result in interleaved characters between threads unless proper synchronization of entire operations is enforced by the program."[1]

Other wise it is generally fine to Turn Off the synchronization.

also see: http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/io/ios_base/sync_with_stdio

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