1

I been doing this javascript challenge and I'm pretty close, but something is off.Here's the challenge:

Given an array of strings containing three types of braces: round (), square [] and curly {} Your task is to write a function that checks whether the braces in each string are correctly matched. Prints 1 to standard output (console.log) if the braces in each string are matched and 0 if they're not (one result per line)

my code is this:

var infoToParse = [ ")(){}", "[]({})", "([])", "{()[]}", "([)]" ]; 

function checkBraces(infoToParse) {
    var tabChars = infoToParse;
    for (i= 0; tabChars.length - 1; i+=1) {
        if (tabChars[i].charAt(0) === tabChars[i].charAt(tabChars[i].length-1)){
            console.log(1);
        }else{
            console.log(0);
        }
    }
}

checkBraces(infoToParse);

The output with the current array items should be Output: 0 1 1 1 0

11
  • 2
    the first and last characters don't have to match for the string to be valid, see inforToParse[1]
    – depperm
    Commented Jul 21, 2015 at 13:21
  • "([)]" should be false or true?
    – Tushar
    Commented Jul 21, 2015 at 13:23
  • 1
    I'm not sure what you're looking for with this question. Do you want us to tell you what's wrong with your code, give you suggestions on how to complete this problem, or just solve it for you? Commented Jul 21, 2015 at 13:24
  • 1
    Checking the first and last characters is not good enough: "{{}"
    – axelduch
    Commented Jul 21, 2015 at 13:26
  • 1
    also comparing the first to the last will return 0 even if the string is {} since { doesn't match }
    – depperm
    Commented Jul 21, 2015 at 13:27

3 Answers 3

5

As pointed out in the comment, only having the first and the last character same would not result in a correct solution.

You can try the following technique: Maintain a stack, each time you encounter an opening bracket i.e round "(", square "[" or curly "{"; push this into stack. Now whenever you encounter a closing bracket, pop an element from the stack. If these two match i.e both are of same type, then carry on till stack and string both are empty. If at any point these don't match then break and return false. I'll write a code for it and post it soon.

4
  • Thanks I didn't think of approaching it that way
    – MikeL5799
    Commented Jul 21, 2015 at 13:51
  • Thanks @PavelGatnar but it needs console.log 0 or 1
    – MikeL5799
    Commented Jul 21, 2015 at 14:09
  • I believe someone had posted the code, though I did not checked it. I can help you with the code, tell me what problem are you facing. Commented Jul 22, 2015 at 13:23
  • I thought they did, but it seems they deleted it. I reworked the code like this: var infoToParse = [ ")(){}", "[]({})", "([])", "{()[]}", "([)]" ]; var tabChars = infoToParse; for (i= 0; tabChars.length < 1; i+=1) { if (tabChars.charAt(0) === tabChars.charAt(tabChars.length-1)){ console.log(1); { }else{ console.log(0); } } } }
    – MikeL5799
    Commented Jul 22, 2015 at 14:04
0

I guess you could do it in this way, keeping a "tree" of starting positions. Didn't test any other testcases than your own though :)

var testCases = [")(){}", "[]({})", "([])", "{()[]}", "([)]"];

var braceType = {
  round: ["(", ")"],
  curly: ["{", "}"],
  square: ["[", "]"]
};

var bracePosition = {
  start: ["{", "(", "["],
  end: ["}", ")", "]"]
};

function typeOfBraces(sign) {
  for (var property in braceType) {
    if (braceType[property].indexOf(sign) < 0) {
      continue;
    }
    if (bracePosition.start.indexOf(sign) < 0) {
      return {
        type: property,
        position: "end"
      };
    } else {
      return {
        type: property,
        position: "start"
      };
    }
  }
  throw "Sign is not a brace!";
};

function Braces(brace, parent, type) {
  this.brace = brace;
  this.parent = parent || null;
  this.type = type || {
    type: 'init',
    position: ''
  };
  this.children = [];

  this.nextBrace = function(nextSign) {
    var nextType = typeOfBraces(nextSign);
    if (nextType.position === 'start') {
      var child = new Braces(nextSign, this, nextType);
      this.children.push(child);
      return child;
    }
    if (nextType.position === 'end') {
      if (this.type.position === '') {
        throw 'Cannot start with an end tag!';
      }
      if (this.type.position === 'end' && this.parent === null) {
        throw 'Cannot end the sequence';
      }
      if (this.type.position === 'end' && this.parent.position === 'start') {
        if (this.type.type === this.parent.type) {
          var child = new Braces(nextSign, this.parent, nextType);
          this.parent.children.add(child);
          return this.parent;
        }
      }
    }
    if (this.type.position === 'start' && nextType.type === this.type.type && nextType.position === 'end') {
      return this.parent;
    }
    return new Braces(nextSign, this, nextType);
  };
}

for (var i = 0; i < testCases.length; i++) {
  var brace = new Braces(testCases[i]);
  for (var j = 0, len = testCases[i].length; j < len; j++) {
    try {
      brace = brace.nextBrace(testCases[i][j]);
    } catch (e) {
      console.log(e);
      brace = null;
      break;
    }
  }
  if (brace != null && brace.parent == null) {
    // valid entry
    console.log(brace);
    console.log(testCases[i] + " is a valid sequence");
  } else {
    // invalid entry
    console.log(testCases[i] + " is an invalid sequence");
  }
}

or, to make it a bit easier and to check check the brackets:

function validBraces(braceSequence) {
  var stack = '',
    i, len, lastStack = -1,
    toAdd = "{([",
    toRemove = "})]",
    sign;
  for (i = 0, len = braceSequence.length; i < len; i++) {
    sign = braceSequence[i];
    if (toAdd.indexOf(sign) >= 0) {
      stack += sign;
      lastStack++;
    } else if (toRemove.indexOf(sign) >= 0) {
      if (toAdd.indexOf(stack.charAt(lastStack)) !== toRemove.indexOf(sign)) {
        // format exception
        console.warn('Format exception, didn\'t expect ' + sign + ' (current stack: ' + stack + ')');
        return false;
      } else {
        stack = stack.slice(0, -1);
        lastStack--;
      }
    } else {
      console.warn('Invalid character exception, didn\'t expect ' + sign + ' (current stack: ' + stack + ')');
      return false;
    }
  }
  return true;
}

var testCases = [")(){}", "[]({})", "([])", "{()[]}", "([)]"];

for (var i = 0; i < testCases.length; i++) {
  if (validBraces(testCases[i])) {
    console.log(testCases[i] + ' is a valid sequence');
  } else {
    console.log(testCases[i] + ' is an invalid sequence');
  }
}

0

If you can use Regular Expressions, you can really slim it down:

var stringArray = [ ")(){}", "[]({})", "([])", "{()[]}", "([)]" ]; 

function checkBraces(infoToParse) {
    for (i = 0; i < infoToParse.length; i += 1) {
    var regX = /^\[.*\]$|^\{.*\}$|^\(.*\)$/gi;
    var str = infoToParse[i];
    console.log(str.match(regX) ? 1 : 0);
    }
}

checkBraces(stringArray);

Also, as I stated in my comment, your for syntax was off. Oh, and instead of i+=1, you can use i++ to simplify it.

3
  • Depending on the actual problem (the title doesn't match the problem statement), this doesn't match the 2nd item in the array Commented Jul 21, 2015 at 13:39
  • Thanks @Daved . I'm still trying to get my javascript skills up to par
    – MikeL5799
    Commented Jul 21, 2015 at 13:41
  • Correct, @JamesThorpe. I was looking more at the title. I didn't see the expected out put he posted.
    – Daved
    Commented Jul 21, 2015 at 15:15

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