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What is the diffference between the | and || or operators?

Logical AND and OR:

(x & y)
(x | y)

Conditional AND and OR:

(x && y)
(x || y)

I've only known about conditional operands up to this point. I know what it does and how to apply it in if-statements. But what is the purpose of logical operands?

marked as duplicate by Michael Stum, Robert Harvey, Matthew Flaschen, John Weldon, spender Jul 1 '10 at 0:02

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up vote 70 down vote accepted

I prefer to think of it as "bitwise vs. conditional" rather than "logical vs conditional" since the general concept of "logical" applies in both cases.

x & y    // bitwise AND, 0101 & 0011 = 0001
x | y    // bitwise OR,  0101 | 0011 = 0111

x && y   // true if both x and y are true
x || y   // true if either x or y are true

Edit

By popular demand, I should also mention that the arguments are evaluated differently. In the conditional version, if the result of the entire operation can be determined by the first argument, the second argument is not evaluated. This is called short-circuit evaluation. Bitwise operations have to evaluate both sides in order to compute the final value.

For example:

x.foo() && y.bar()

This will only call y.bar() if x.foo() evaluates to true. Conversely,

x.foo() || y.bar()

will only call y.bar() if x.foo() evaluates to false.

  • 10
    OK. What about lazy evaluation? Are you going to mention that? Because if you do, I can delete my most unpopular answer. – Robert Harvey Jun 30 '10 at 23:31
  • Lazy evaluation is a subset of the logical operations way of operating. Should be mentioned, but is irrelevant to the question. – John Weldon Jun 30 '10 at 23:32
  • @John Weldon: The question is about the differences between the operators. And laziness surely is one of them. – Dirk Vollmar Jun 30 '10 at 23:44
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    Just a note - Logical vs Conditional is Microsoft's naming definitions of them msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/6a71f45d%28v=vs.80%29.aspx – Mad Halfling Aug 24 '12 at 10:35
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    I cam here when this answer was used under another question to 'proof' that & is a bitwise boolean operator. There is no general answer, your opening sentence is flat out wrong. – Henk Holterman Aug 14 '13 at 8:41
(x && y) 

is lazy. It will only evaluate y if x is true.

(x & y)

is not lazy. y will always be evaluated.

  • 15
    That's only half the story, and arguably the less important half. – Kennet Belenky Jun 30 '10 at 23:27
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    @John, it's absolutely correct. When operating on booleans, the only difference is "laziness". Effectively the operation is no different whether operating on booleans or larger integral types. It's doing a bitwise on two single bits and returning a bit. – spender Jun 30 '10 at 23:31
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    @John That is flat true. From the C# Spec in Section 7.10.3 Boolean logical operators: "The result of x | y is true if either x or y is true. Otherwise, the result is false." Also see Section 7.11 Conditional logical operators: "The operation x || y corresponds to the operation x | y, except that y is evaluated only if x is false." . – Michael Stum Jun 30 '10 at 23:32
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    @Robert, I concede that reference in relation to booleans. Surely you agree that the question is more broad than that? – John Weldon Jun 30 '10 at 23:34
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    Meh. I think I'll go answer some other questions. – Robert Harvey Jun 30 '10 at 23:35

Updated Answer - my original was misleading and incomplete.

First I should apologize for much of my comments and responses to this question.

After reading the spec, the distinction between bitwise and conditional operators is much less clear cut.

According to section 14.10 of ECMA-334:

The &, ^, and | operators are called the logical operators.

for integer operations:

1 The & operator computes the bitwise logical AND of the two operands, the | operator computes the bitwise logical OR of the two operands, and the ^ operator computes the bitwise logical exclusive OR of the two operands. 2 No overflows are possible from these operations.

According to section 14.11:

The && and || operators are called the conditional logical operators. 2 They are also called the "short-circuiting" logical operators.

14.11.1

1 When the operands of && or || are of type bool, or when the operands are of types that do not define an applicable operator & or operator |, but do define implicit conversions to bool, the operation is processed as follows: 2 The operation x && y is evaluated as x ? y : false. 3 In other words, x is first evaluated and converted to type bool. 4 Then, if x is true, y is evaluated and converted to type bool, and this becomes the result of the operation. 5 Otherwise, the result of the operation is false. 6 The operation x || y is evaluated as x ? true : y. 7 In other words, x is first evaluated and converted to type bool. 8 Then, if x is true, the result of the operation is true. 9 Otherwise, y is evaluated and converted to type bool, and this becomes the result of the operation.

14.11.2

1 When the operands of && or || are of types that declare an applicable user-defined operator & or operator |, both of the following must be true, where T is the type in which the selected operator is declared: 2 The return type and the type of each parameter of the selected operator must be T. 3 In other words, the operator must compute the logical AND or the logical OR of two operands of type T, and must return a result of type T. 4 T must contain declarations of operator true and operator false. Paragraph 2 1 A compile-time error occurs if either of these requirements is not satisfied. 2 Otherwise, the && or || operation is evaluated by combining the user-defined operator true or operator false with the selected user-defined operator: 3 The operation x && y is evaluated as T.false(x) ? x : T.&(x, y), where T.false(x) is an invocation of the operator false declared in T, and T.&(x, y) is an invocation of the selected operator &. 4 In other words, x is first evaluated and operator false is invoked on the result to determine if x is definitely false. 5 Then, if x is definitely false, the result of the operation is the value previously computed for x. 6 Otherwise, y is evaluated, and the selected operator & is invoked on the value previously computed for x and the value computed for y to produce the result of the operation. 7 The operation x || y is evaluated as T.true(x) ? x : T.|(x, y), where T.true(x) is an invocation of the operator true declared in T, and T.|(x, y) is an invocation of the selected operator |. 8 In other words, x is first evaluated and operator true is invoked on the result to determine if x is definitely true. 9 Then, if x is definitely true, the result of the operation is the value previously computed for x. 10 Otherwise, y is evaluated, and the selected operator | is invoked on the value previously computed for x and the value computed for y to produce the result of the operation. Paragraph 3 1 In either of these operations, the expression given by x is only evaluated once, and the expression given by y is either not evaluated or evaluated exactly once. Paragraph 4 1 For an example of a type that implements operator true and operator false, see §18.4.2.

  • 4
    &, |, and ^ are overloaded. For two booleans, they are simply eager (non-conditional) logical operators (ECMA-364 §14.10.3) – Matthew Flaschen Jun 30 '10 at 23:32
  • @Matthew, this question is posed more broadly than as pertains to booleans. – John Weldon Jun 30 '10 at 23:39
  • actually I think I disagree. It is clear from the second example that x and y are booleans. Bitwise operators never enter into the question. – Matthew Flaschen Jun 30 '10 at 23:40
  • @Matthew; Agreed, it could be interpreted that way. – John Weldon Jun 30 '10 at 23:46

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