18

I have two lists to describe the function y(x):

x = [0,1,2,3,4,5]
y = [12,14,22,39,58,77]

I would like to perform cubic spline interpolation so that given some value u in the domain of x, e.g.

u = 1.25

I can find y(u).

I found this in SciPy but I am not sure how to use it.

25

Short answer:

from scipy import interpolate

def f(x):
    x_points = [ 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
    y_points = [12,14,22,39,58,77]

    tck = interpolate.splrep(x_points, y_points)
    return interpolate.splev(x, tck)

print(f(1.25))

Long answer:

scipy separates the steps involved in spline interpolation into two operations, most likely for computational efficiency.

  1. The coefficients describing the spline curve are computed, using splrep(). splrep returns an array of tuples containing the coefficients.

  2. These coefficients are passed into splev() to actually evaluate the spline at the desired point x (in this example 1.25). x can also be an array. Calling f([1.0, 1.25, 1.5]) returns the interpolated points at 1, 1.25, and 1,5, respectively.

This approach is admittedly inconvenient for single evaluations, but since the most common use case is to start with a handful of function evaluation points, then to repeatedly use the spline to find interpolated values, it is usually quite useful in practice.

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  • 3
    You can avoid calculate the spline every time you call the function by moving tck = interpolate.splrep(x_points, y_points) and the two lines above outside of f(x). – cwhy Dec 9 '16 at 12:55
  • Numpy np is unused – Christophe Roussy Dec 20 '16 at 16:30
  • 1
    Good answer. Just a doubt, why did you choose "tck"? Where does this initial come from? – Pedro Delfino Sep 8 '18 at 22:39
  • 1
    @PedroDelfino the same notation, tck is used in documentation docs.scipy.org/doc/scipy/reference/generated/… – icemtel Jun 13 '19 at 12:21
  • @cwhy In other words, ditch the function and do print(interpolate.splev(1.25, tck)) ;-) – AstroFloyd Mar 14 at 14:00
21

In case, scipy is not installed:

import numpy as np
from math import sqrt

def cubic_interp1d(x0, x, y):
    """
    Interpolate a 1-D function using cubic splines.
      x0 : a float or an 1d-array
      x : (N,) array_like
          A 1-D array of real/complex values.
      y : (N,) array_like
          A 1-D array of real values. The length of y along the
          interpolation axis must be equal to the length of x.

    Implement a trick to generate at first step the cholesky matrice L of
    the tridiagonal matrice A (thus L is a bidiagonal matrice that
    can be solved in two distinct loops).

    additional ref: www.math.uh.edu/~jingqiu/math4364/spline.pdf 
    """
    x = np.asfarray(x)
    y = np.asfarray(y)

    # remove non finite values
    # indexes = np.isfinite(x)
    # x = x[indexes]
    # y = y[indexes]

    # check if sorted
    if np.any(np.diff(x) < 0):
        indexes = np.argsort(x)
        x = x[indexes]
        y = y[indexes]

    size = len(x)

    xdiff = np.diff(x)
    ydiff = np.diff(y)

    # allocate buffer matrices
    Li = np.empty(size)
    Li_1 = np.empty(size-1)
    z = np.empty(size)

    # fill diagonals Li and Li-1 and solve [L][y] = [B]
    Li[0] = sqrt(2*xdiff[0])
    Li_1[0] = 0.0
    B0 = 0.0 # natural boundary
    z[0] = B0 / Li[0]

    for i in range(1, size-1, 1):
        Li_1[i] = xdiff[i-1] / Li[i-1]
        Li[i] = sqrt(2*(xdiff[i-1]+xdiff[i]) - Li_1[i-1] * Li_1[i-1])
        Bi = 6*(ydiff[i]/xdiff[i] - ydiff[i-1]/xdiff[i-1])
        z[i] = (Bi - Li_1[i-1]*z[i-1])/Li[i]

    i = size - 1
    Li_1[i-1] = xdiff[-1] / Li[i-1]
    Li[i] = sqrt(2*xdiff[-1] - Li_1[i-1] * Li_1[i-1])
    Bi = 0.0 # natural boundary
    z[i] = (Bi - Li_1[i-1]*z[i-1])/Li[i]

    # solve [L.T][x] = [y]
    i = size-1
    z[i] = z[i] / Li[i]
    for i in range(size-2, -1, -1):
        z[i] = (z[i] - Li_1[i-1]*z[i+1])/Li[i]

    # find index
    index = x.searchsorted(x0)
    np.clip(index, 1, size-1, index)

    xi1, xi0 = x[index], x[index-1]
    yi1, yi0 = y[index], y[index-1]
    zi1, zi0 = z[index], z[index-1]
    hi1 = xi1 - xi0

    # calculate cubic
    f0 = zi0/(6*hi1)*(xi1-x0)**3 + \
         zi1/(6*hi1)*(x0-xi0)**3 + \
         (yi1/hi1 - zi1*hi1/6)*(x0-xi0) + \
         (yi0/hi1 - zi0*hi1/6)*(xi1-x0)
    return f0

if __name__ == '__main__':
    import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
    x = np.linspace(0, 10, 11)
    y = np.sin(x)
    plt.scatter(x, y)

    x_new = np.linspace(0, 10, 201)
    plt.plot(x_new, cubic_interp1d(x_new, x, y))

    plt.show()
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14

If you have scipy version >= 0.18.0 installed you can use CubicSpline function from scipy.interpolate for cubic spline interpolation.

You can check scipy version by running following commands in python:

#!/usr/bin/env python3
import scipy
scipy.version.version

If your scipy version is >= 0.18.0 you can run following example code for cubic spline interpolation:

#!/usr/bin/env python3

import numpy as np
from scipy.interpolate import CubicSpline

# calculate 5 natural cubic spline polynomials for 6 points
# (x,y) = (0,12) (1,14) (2,22) (3,39) (4,58) (5,77)
x = np.array([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5])
y = np.array([12,14,22,39,58,77])

# calculate natural cubic spline polynomials
cs = CubicSpline(x,y,bc_type='natural')

# show values of interpolation function at x=1.25
print('S(1.25) = ', cs(1.25))

## Aditional - find polynomial coefficients for different x regions

# if you want to print polynomial coefficients in form
# S0(0<=x<=1) = a0 + b0(x-x0) + c0(x-x0)^2 + d0(x-x0)^3
# S1(1< x<=2) = a1 + b1(x-x1) + c1(x-x1)^2 + d1(x-x1)^3
# ...
# S4(4< x<=5) = a4 + b4(x-x4) + c5(x-x4)^2 + d5(x-x4)^3
# x0 = 0; x1 = 1; x4 = 4; (start of x region interval)

# show values of a0, b0, c0, d0, a1, b1, c1, d1 ...
cs.c

# Polynomial coefficients for 0 <= x <= 1
a0 = cs.c.item(3,0)
b0 = cs.c.item(2,0)
c0 = cs.c.item(1,0)
d0 = cs.c.item(0,0)

# Polynomial coefficients for 1 < x <= 2
a1 = cs.c.item(3,1)
b1 = cs.c.item(2,1)
c1 = cs.c.item(1,1)
d1 = cs.c.item(0,1)

# ...

# Polynomial coefficients for 4 < x <= 5
a4 = cs.c.item(3,4)
b4 = cs.c.item(2,4)
c4 = cs.c.item(1,4)
d4 = cs.c.item(0,4)

# Print polynomial equations for different x regions
print('S0(0<=x<=1) = ', a0, ' + ', b0, '(x-0) + ', c0, '(x-0)^2  + ', d0, '(x-0)^3')
print('S1(1< x<=2) = ', a1, ' + ', b1, '(x-1) + ', c1, '(x-1)^2  + ', d1, '(x-1)^3')
print('...')
print('S5(4< x<=5) = ', a4, ' + ', b4, '(x-4) + ', c4, '(x-4)^2  + ', d4, '(x-4)^3')

# So we can calculate S(1.25) by using equation S1(1< x<=2)
print('S(1.25) = ', a1 + b1*0.25 + c1*(0.25**2) + d1*(0.25**3))

# Cubic spline interpolation calculus example
    #  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gT7F3TWihvk
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  • 1
    This maybe the simplest answer but is the best, the SciPy library already has a CubicSpline class and @nexayq has identified it! – S Meaden Jun 11 '18 at 19:23
2

Minimal python3 code:

from scipy import interpolate

if __name__ == '__main__':
    x = [ 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
    y = [12,14,22,39,58,77]

    # tck : tuple (t,c,k) a tuple containing the vector of knots,
    # the B-spline coefficients, and the degree of the spline.
    tck = interpolate.splrep(x, y)

    print(interpolate.splev(1.25, tck)) # Prints 15.203125000000002
    print(interpolate.splev(...other_value_here..., tck))

Based on comment of cwhy and answer by youngmit

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