40

I know that in C and C++, when casting bools to ints, (int)true == 1 and (int)false == 0. I'm wondering about casting in the reverse direction...

In the code below, all of the following assertions held true for me in .c files compiled with Visual Studio 2013 and Keil µVision 5. Notice (bool)2 == true.

What do the C and C++ standards say about casting non-zero, non-one integers to bools? Is this behavior specified? Please include citations.

#include <stdbool.h>
#include <assert.h>

void TestBoolCast(void)
{
    int i0 = 0, i1 = 1, i2 = 2;

    assert((bool)i0 == false);
    assert((bool)i1 == true);
    assert((bool)i2 == true);

    assert(!!i0 == false);
    assert(!!i1 == true);
    assert(!!i2 == true);
}

Not a duplicate of Can I assume (bool)true == (int)1 for any C++ compiler?:

  1. Casting in the reverse direction (int --> bool).
  2. No discussion there of non-zero, non-one values.
11
  • 5
    All non-zero integers should cast to true. I don't have a the specifications so I'm not posting an answer.
    – yizzlez
    Jul 22 '15 at 0:30
  • in C/C++ anything !0 is true and 0 is false. So, 2 is indeed true. (2 != 0) == true.
    – ydobonebi
    Jul 22 '15 at 0:32
  • 2
    @SergeyK. Did you actually read the question?
    – emlai
    Jul 22 '15 at 0:32
  • 1
    it is always safe to use (n != 0) instead of (bool)n Jul 22 '15 at 0:33
  • The behavior I believe started with K&R C and was kept
    – ydobonebi
    Jul 22 '15 at 0:36
59

0 values of basic types (1)(2)map to false.

Other values map to true.

This convention was established in original C, via its flow control statements; C didn't have a boolean type at the time.


It's a common error to assume that as function return values, false indicates failure. But in particular from main it's false that indicates success. I've seen this done wrong many times, including in the Windows starter code for the D language (when you have folks like Walter Bright and Andrei Alexandrescu getting it wrong, then it's just dang easy to get wrong), hence this heads-up beware beware.


There's no need to cast to bool for built-in types because that conversion is implicit. However, Visual C++ (Microsoft's C++ compiler) has a tendency to issue a performance warning (!) for this, a pure silly-warning. A cast doesn't suffice to shut it up, but a conversion via double negation, i.e. return !!x, works nicely. One can read !! as a “convert to bool” operator, much as --> can be read as “goes to”. For those who are deeply into readability of operator notation. ;-)


1) C++14 §4.12/1 “A zero value, null pointer value, or null member pointer value is converted to false; any other value is converted to true. For direct-initialization (8.5), a prvalue of type std::nullptr_t can be converted to a prvalue of type bool; the resulting value is false.”
2) C99 and C11 §6.3.1.2/1 “When any scalar value is converted to _Bool, the result is 0 if the value compares equal to 0; otherwise, the result is 1.”

9
  • 14
    I don't think of main as returning "false" for success. main returns int, not bool, and with different conventions for success/failure. (Unix system calls use yet a third mapping.) Jul 22 '15 at 0:48
  • Can you cite the sections of the standards that confirm your first section?
    – cp.engr
    Jul 22 '15 at 0:51
  • 2
    @cp.engr: I guess you don't have a copy of the standard or a draft. It's a good idea to get one, e.g. N3936 (latest draft) for C++14. Where, when you check it out, you find that §4.12 states "A zero value, null pointer value, or null member pointer value is converted to false; any other value is converted to true. For direct-initialization (8.5), a prvalue of type std::nullptr_t can be converted to a prvalue of type bool; the resulting value is false.". I hope this wasn't homework? It's very important to train on finding one's way in documentation, including the Holy Standard™. Jul 22 '15 at 0:55
  • @Cheersandhth.-Alf, no, not homework; I am a working professional. Just not well-versed in navigating the standards yet. What about C, as it relates to stdbool?
    – cp.engr
    Jul 22 '15 at 1:00
  • 2
    @cp.engr: Oh. I don't have the latest C standards, sorry. In C99 it was specified in §6.3.1.2/1 "When any scalar value is converted to _Bool, the result is 0 if the value compares equal to 0; otherwise, the result is 1" Jul 22 '15 at 1:06
18

The following cites the C11 standard (final draft).

6.3.1.2: When any scalar value is converted to _Bool, the result is 0 if the value compares equal to 0; otherwise, the result is 1.

bool (mapped by stdbool.h to the internal name _Bool for C) itself is an unsigned integer type:

... The type _Bool and the unsigned integer types that correspond to the standard signed integer types are the standard unsigned integer types.

According to 6.2.5p2:

An object declared as type _Bool is large enough to store the values 0 and 1.

AFAIK these definitions are semantically identical to C++ - with the minor difference of the built-in(!) names. bool for C++ and _Bool for C.

Note that C does not use the term rvalues as C++ does. However, in C pointers are scalars, so assigning a pointer to a _Bool behaves as in C++.

9
  • 2
    And from C++03: "An rvalue of arithmetic, enumeration, pointer, or pointer to member type can be converted to an rvalue of type bool. A zero value, null pointer value, or null member pointer value is converted to false; any other value is converted to true". I'm sure that this question is a dupe. Jul 22 '15 at 1:04
  • 2
    Re "AFAIK these definitions are identical between C and C++", no not quite. In C++ bool is a built-in type, not a macro, and there's nothing like _Bool. Jul 22 '15 at 1:08
  • 1
    @Cheersandhth.-Alf: Yes, I think I stated that clear enough by "mapped by stdbool.h to the internal name _Bool for C". It is just the names: C:_Bool (bool is a macro mapping to _Bool), C++: bool. Reason is backwards-compatibility, as much code has its own bool alias/#define/enum. That type was just added too late to the standard. Jul 22 '15 at 1:12
  • 1
    @cp.engr: I agree that your question isn't a dupe of the one that's linked to in the close. I probably shouldn't have mentioned anything about dupes in my comment - sorry for that. It really doesn't matter much to me whether it's a dupe or not. It's a legit question with legit answers. The bottom line is that you should be able to count on the intuitive behavior (0 converts to false and non-zero converts to true). Jul 22 '15 at 17:24
  • 1
    A trap to watch out for is that some codebases (especially pre-C99 ones) may typedef char bool or typedef int bool instead of using stdbool.h
    – M.M
    Jan 21 '17 at 23:19
0

There some kind of old school 'Marxismic' way to the cast int -> bool without C4800 warnings of Microsoft's cl compiler - is to use negation of negation.

int  i  = 0;
bool bi = !!i;

int  j  = 1;
bool bj = !!j;
1
  • 1
    This is not casting, and doesn't answer the question.
    – cp.engr
    Jul 22 '20 at 7:00

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