11

Windbg should understand the MS exception protocol used to pass thread names to a debugger.

I can't get this to work. Looking on the net there are many examples showing "~" thread lists with no thread names, and that's what I see. I'm debugging a .NET x86 process, and I've tried the WDK 8.1 x86 and x64 versions of Windbg.

Does anyone know if this feature is still available? What am I missing?

14

For .NET threads, the following works for "normal" Threads (manually created threads, since I don't know a way to name threadpool threads):

A Thread is a class and thus can be found in the .NET managed heap:

0:000>.loadby sos clr
0:000> !dumpheap -stat -type Thread
      MT    Count    TotalSize Class Name
...
725e4960       11          572 System.Threading.Thread

Note that there is other output as well, since !dumpheap looks for parts of class names. The Method Table (MT) however, identifies a class uniquely, so that's what we use from now on:

0:000> !dumpheap -short -mt 725e4960
023123d0
02312464
02313c80
...

These are the addresses of Thread objects. Since it is clean output, we can use it in a loop:

0:000> .foreach (address {!dumpheap -short -mt 725e4960}) {.echo ${address} }
023123d0
02312464
02313c80    
...

Inside the loop, we can use the address to get more information about the thread. First, let's find out how a Thread looks like internally:

0:000> !do 023123d0
Name:        System.Threading.Thread
...
Fields:
      MT    Field   Offset                 Type VT     Attr    Value Name
...
725e3e18  400076e        c        System.String  0 instance 02313c0c m_Name
...

At offset +0xC (depending on the bitness!), there's the m_Name member. That's a string. Let's find out how a string looks like:

0:000> !do poi(023123d0+c)
Name:        System.String
...
Fields:
      MT    Field   Offset                 Type VT     Attr    Value Name
...
725e4810  40000ac        8          System.Char  1 instance       4d m_firstChar

So, the first character of the string is at offset +0x08. Strings in .NET are Unicode, so we can view it with du:

0:000> du poi(023123d0+c)+8
02313c14  "My named thread 0"

Combine all this knowledge into a single command:

.foreach (address {!dumpheap -short -mt 725e4960})
{
    du poi(${address}+c)+8
}

(formatted for readability, put it all in one line)

If you try that, you'll find that it may output something like

00000008  "????????????????????????????????"

This happens when m_Name is null. If you care about that, you can add a check for null:

.foreach (address {!dumpheap -short -mt 725e4960})
{
    .if (poi(${address}+c) != 0) {
        du poi(${address}+c)+8
    }
}

(formatted for readability, put it all in one line)

Other improvements:

  • do the same for the thread ID
  • prettify output (use .printf instead of dd and du)

Final result:

.foreach (address {!dumpheap -short -mt 725e4960}) 
{
    .if (poi(${address}+c) != 0) 
    {
        .printf "%d ",poi(${address}+28);
        .printf "%mu\r\n", poi(${address}+c)+8
    }
}
  • Thread pool threads are no different from regular threads, but naming them is usually pointless since they are reused. – Brian Rasmussen Jul 22 '15 at 20:58
  • It seems .NET doesn't use the first-chance exception protocol for thread names, though I haven't had time to verify that. Thanks for the tutorial. I've added your script to my rarely-used WinDbg cheat sheet! – Nick Westgate Jul 28 '15 at 22:54
0

Does anyone know if this feature is still available?

Yes, this feature is still available. At least for native applications.

For .NET apps method from 'How to: Set a Thread Name in Managed Code' may be preferred over throwing an exception.

  • 2
    Which feature are you talking about? Naming threads or showing named threads in WinDbg? Please extend a bit on how to show thread names in WinDbg. – Thomas Weller Jul 22 '15 at 19:57

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