2

I'm running a monte carlo simulation. Work is partitioned among many different machines (typically around 150).

After each iteration, each worker sends its results to the server. After getting results from all workers, server calculates an update and sends it back to all workers.

This cycle repeats for 100-1000 iterations.

Server cannot compute update until all workers send their results, so if 99 workers take 1 second to finish an iteration and 100th worker takes 10 seconds, then entire iteration takes 10 seconds.

The problem is that GC randomly kicks in on some workers on some iterations, so causing these workers to take more time and thus slowing the entire process down.

For example during iteration #1 worker #58 took 10 seconds, where other workers took 8 seconds. On iteration #2 different worker takes longer and so on.

This added overhead seems to be around 20-30%.

What I would like to do is to instruct GC not to do any collections while iteration is taking place. Collect only every say 10 iterations (so that all workers synchronize their collections), or collect after sending results, and before getting an update from the server.

Here is a pseudocode for what I'm trying to do:

public void Algorithm()
{
  for (var iteration = 0; iteration < 1000; iteration++)
  {
     PerformIteration(); //don't do any GC inside.
     SendResults();
     //Now there is a small time window to perform GC
     //before results from the server arrive (thats usually sub 0.5sec window)
     WaitForUpdate();
  }
}

Setting: GCSettings.LatencyMode = GCLatencyMode.SustainedLowLatency helped quite a bit, but significant overhead still remains.

Each worker has 244gb of ram, considerably more than simulation requires. Also, almost everything is cached, so no need to do Gen2 collections.

  • you may write the critical part in unmanged c++ – Chaka Jul 22 '15 at 10:34
  • You are solving the wrong problem. There just isn't any obvious need to wait for all machines to complete their job. Just parcel out another one when a machine delivers its results. – Hans Passant Jul 22 '15 at 11:40
  • @HansPassant Server must wait for all workers to calculate an 'update' which workers then use in the next iteration. This isn't some kind of work queue where server gives work items to workers as they become available. What happens is that there is a huge tree to traverse and update, and workers have specific subtrees assigned to traverse. Then server updates a few top level nodes in that tree and sends results to workers which need it to properly perform next iteration. – Michal Jul 22 '15 at 11:47
  • Hmm, that doesn't make much sense. Describe in your question what you do if you have only 50 machines available. Or what you do with 150 machines and the tree is 3 times as big. – Hans Passant Jul 22 '15 at 12:09
  • @HansPassant Imagine a tree with N subrees from a root (ie root has N children). There are M workers. The work is divided so that each worker gets about N/M subtrees to work on. Now one common case is with 338 subtrees and 169 workers, so that each of them gets exactly 2 subtrees. In this case if I only used 168 workers, then one of them would need to work on at least 3 subtrees, slowing down the speed by 33%. These subtrees are generally of similar size. If subtrees are 3x bigger, then simulation will take 3x as long. – Michal Jul 22 '15 at 12:15
5

.NET 4.6 has a new GC feature called GC.TryStartNoGCRegion.

This tells the GC to attempt to run this block of code without doing any collections at all:

Attempts to disallow garbage collection during the execution of a critical path if a specified amount of memory is available, and controls whether the garbage collector does a full blocking garbage collection if not enough memory is initially available.

When you invoke it, you instruct the GC how much memory you can allocate before it has to perform a GC. It must be less than or equal to the ephemeral segments size:

public void Algorithm()
{
   for (var iteration = 0; iteration < 1000; iteration++)
   {
        // allow the GC to allocate 4kb
        if (GC.TryStartNoGCRegion(4096, true))
        {
            try
            {
                PerformIteration();
                SendResults();
            }
            finally
            {
                GC.EndNoGCRegion();
            }
        }

      //Now there is a small time window to perform GC
      //before results from the server arrive (thats usually sub 0.5sec window)
      WaitForUpdate();
   }
}
  • Tried something like that, but I think I used it in a wrong way and GC.TryStartNoGCRegion was hanging the application! I'll try your proposed solution and see how it works. – Michal Jul 22 '15 at 11:58
0

-You can use unmanaged code on C# with this (GC.AddMemoryPressure)

-or use managed GC blocks

GC.TryStartNoGCRegion(.)
{
   // your critical code
} GC.EndNoGCRegion()

*don't forgot check Try-condition as on previous answer

-GCSettings.LatencyMode look at MS manual

-change GC configuration in *.config file (app or machine) with gcServer and gcConcurrent params

<configuration>
    <runtime>
        <gcServer enabled="true"/>
<!-- OR / AND -->
        <gcConcurrent enabled="true|false"/>
    </runtime>
</configuration>
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