104

I am writing a Mesh Rendering manager and thought it would be a good idea to group all of the meshes which use the same shader and then render these while I'm in that shader pass.

I am currently using a foreach loop, but wondered if utilising LINQ might give me a performance increase?

187

Why should LINQ be faster? It also uses loops internally.

Most of the times, LINQ will be a bit slower because it introduces overhead. Do not use LINQ if you care much about performance. Use LINQ because you want shorter better readable and maintainable code.

  • 6
    So your experience is that LINQ is faster and makes code harder to read and to maintain? Please explain. – codymanix Jun 27 '11 at 13:51
  • 78
    I think you had it backward. He is saying LINQ is SLOWER. This is due to over head. He is also saying that LINQ is easier to read and maintain. – Joseph McIntyre Feb 5 '13 at 17:18
  • 4
    Sorry. In the meantime we had a lot of things where we compared linq and for or foreach performance, and most of the time linq was faster. – Offler Oct 30 '13 at 11:56
  • 26
    To be honest in my opinion, a foreach loop is more readable than its LINQ Method. I use LINQ because it's cool :) – LuckyLikey May 20 '15 at 13:19
  • 3
    Yes but in some cases LINQ may really improve readability, so forget my mindless comment <3 – LuckyLikey May 20 '15 at 13:35
55

LINQ-to-Objects generally is going to add some marginal overheads (multiple iterators, etc). It still has to do the loops, and has delegate invokes, and will generally have to do some extra dereferencing to get at captured variables etc. In most code this will be virtually undetectable, and more than afforded by the simpler to understand code.

With other LINQ providers like LINQ-to-SQL, then since the query can filter at the server it should be much better than a flat foreach, but most likely you wouldn't have done a blanket "select * from foo" anyway, so that isn't necessarily a fair comparison.

Re PLINQ; parallelism may reduce the elapsed time, but the total CPU time will usually increase a little due to the overheads of thread management etc.

  • In another answer you alluded to not using LINQ on in-memory collections - e.g. List<Foo>; instead, I should use a foreach block on these collections. The recommendation to use foreach in these contexts does make sense. My concern: should I only replace LINQ queries with foreach if I detect a performance issue? Going forward, I will consider the foreach first. – IAbstract Apr 26 '12 at 15:35
16

I think LINQ is better to use over a foreach loop, because it gives you much cleaner and easy-to-understand code. But LINQ is slower than foreach. To get more, go through the article LINQ vs FOREACH vs FOR Loop Performance.

14

LINQ is slower now, but it might get faster at some point. The good thing about LINQ is that you don't have to care about how it works. If a new method is thought up that's incredibly fast, the people at Microsoft can implement it without even telling you and your code would be a lot faster.

More importantly though, LINQ is just much easier to read. That should be enough reason.

  • 3
    I like the line "Microsoft can implement it" is it possible, I mean is it possible without i upgrading the framework? – Shrivallabh Oct 15 '15 at 10:14
  • LINQ will never really get faster than the native implementation, since at the end of the day, it translates to the native implementation. There are no special LINQ CPU instructions and LINQ registers that can be used to translate faster LINQ machine code - and if there were, they would be used by non-LINQ code too. – mg30rg Nov 20 '17 at 10:31
  • No true, at some point certain link operations may become multi-threaded or even utilise the GPU at some point. – John Stock Apr 5 at 22:19
10

It should probably be noted that the for loop is faster than the foreach. So for the original post, if you are worried about performance on a critical component like a renderer, use a for loop.

Reference: In .NET, which loop runs faster, 'for' or 'foreach'?

9

You might get a performance boost if you use parallel LINQ for multi cores. See Parallel LINQ (PLINQ) (MSDN).

3

This is actually quite a complex question. Linq makes certain things very easy to do, that if you implement them yourself, you might stumble over (e.g. linq .Except()). This particularly applies to PLinq, and especially to parallel aggregation as implemented by PLinq.

In general, for identical code, linq will be slower, because of the overhead of delegate invocation.

If, however, you are processing a large array of data, and applying relatively simple calculations to the elements, you will get a huge performance increase if:

  1. You use an array to store the data.
  2. You use a for loop to access each element (as opposed to foreach or linq).

    • Note: When benchmarking, please everyone remember - if you use the same array/list for two consecutive tests, the CPU cache will make the second one faster. *
2

I was interested in this question, so I did a test just now. Using .NET Framework 4.5.2 on an Intel(R) Core(TM) i3-2328M CPU @ 2.20GHz, 2200 Mhz, 2 Core(s) with 8GB ram running Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate.

It looks like LINQ might be faster than for each loop. Here are the results I got:

Exists = True
Time   = 174
Exists = True
Time   = 149

It would be interesting if some of you could copy & paste this code in a console app and test as well. Before testing with an object (Employee) I tried the same test with integers. LINQ was faster there as well.

public class Program
{
    public class Employee
    {
        public int id;
        public string name;
        public string lastname;
        public DateTime dateOfBirth;

        public Employee(int id,string name,string lastname,DateTime dateOfBirth)
        {
            this.id = id;
            this.name = name;
            this.lastname = lastname;
            this.dateOfBirth = dateOfBirth;

        }
    }

    public static void Main() => StartObjTest();

    #region object test

    public static void StartObjTest()
    {
        List<Employee> items = new List<Employee>();

        for (int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++)
        {
            items.Add(new Employee(i,"name" + i,"lastname" + i,DateTime.Today));
        }

        Test3(items, items.Count-100);
        Test4(items, items.Count - 100);

        Console.Read();
    }


    public static void Test3(List<Employee> items, int idToCheck)
    {

        Stopwatch s = new Stopwatch();
        s.Start();

        bool exists = false;
        foreach (var item in items)
        {
            if (item.id == idToCheck)
            {
                exists = true;
                break;
            }
        }

        Console.WriteLine("Exists=" + exists);
        Console.WriteLine("Time=" + s.ElapsedMilliseconds);

    }

    public static void Test4(List<Employee> items, int idToCheck)
    {

        Stopwatch s = new Stopwatch();
        s.Start();

        bool exists = items.Exists(e => e.id == idToCheck);

        Console.WriteLine("Exists=" + exists);
        Console.WriteLine("Time=" + s.ElapsedMilliseconds);

    }

    #endregion


    #region int test
    public static void StartIntTest()
    {
        List<int> items = new List<int>();

        for (int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++)
        {
            items.Add(i);
        }

        Test1(items, -100);
        Test2(items, -100);

        Console.Read();
    }

    public static void Test1(List<int> items,int itemToCheck)
    {

        Stopwatch s = new Stopwatch();
        s.Start();

        bool exists = false;
        foreach (var item in items)
        {
            if (item == itemToCheck)
            {
                exists = true;
                break;
            }
        }

        Console.WriteLine("Exists=" + exists);
        Console.WriteLine("Time=" + s.ElapsedMilliseconds);

    }

    public static void Test2(List<int> items, int itemToCheck)
    {

        Stopwatch s = new Stopwatch();
        s.Start();

        bool exists = items.Contains(itemToCheck);

        Console.WriteLine("Exists=" + exists);
        Console.WriteLine("Time=" + s.ElapsedMilliseconds);

    }

    #endregion

}
  • This is what I got: Exists=True Time=274 Exists=True Time=314 – PmanAce Apr 3 '18 at 21:16
  • have you considered doing the linq first and foreach later, it might make some difference as well – Muhammad Mamoor Khan May 14 at 11:03

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.