1

Although it is not a good practice, I am using a double for loop to perform a calculation. To illustrate the error I am getting, the following for loop would do. Why is the 'j' counter exceeding '5' in the inner for loop?

> for(i in 1:5){
+   for(j in i+1:5)
+     print(c(i,j))
+ }
[1] 1 2
[1] 1 3
[1] 1 4
[1] 1 5
[1] 1 6
[1] 2 3
[1] 2 4
[1] 2 5
[1] 2 6
[1] 2 7
[1] 3 4
[1] 3 5
[1] 3 6
[1] 3 7
[1] 3 8
[1] 4 5
[1] 4 6
[1] 4 7
[1] 4 8
[1] 4 9
[1] 5 6
[1] 5 7
[1] 5 8
[1] 5 9
[1]  5 10
  • 10
    Because + takes precedence over :. Use for(i in i + (1:5)) – Andrie Jul 22 '15 at 13:33
  • 1
    It looks like the : is taking precedence in the results. Otherwise i+1:5 would have different lengths for each value of i. On testing it definitely seems that : is taking precedence over +, and the displayed result is what you get when that is the case. Was for(j in 1:5) or for(j in i:5) what was intended? – CJB Jul 22 '15 at 13:52
  • 1
    @Andrie Thanks! I need to do -- for(j in (i+1):5) to get what I want – Angad Gadre Jul 22 '15 at 15:18
  • 2
    @Andrie This is not correct. The : operator has a higher priority than +. Therefore for (j in i +1:5) is identical to for (j in i +(1:5)). – RHertel Jul 22 '15 at 15:31
  • in the first round of your loop, i==1 and 1+5 == 6...your loop is doing 1+1,1+2..1+5,2+1,2+2..2+5 :) – user1317221_G Jul 22 '15 at 15:41
8

Why is the 'j' counter exceeding '5' in the inner for loop?

for(j in i+1:5) is equivalent of for(j in i+(1:5)) which can in turn be developed to for(j in (i+1):(i+5))

The reason can be found here

The following unary and binary operators are defined. They are listed in precedence groups, from highest to lowest.

:: :::    access variables in a namespace
$ @   component / slot extraction
[ [[  indexing
^ exponentiation (right to left)
- +   unary minus and plus
: sequence operator ###
%any% special operators (including %% and %/%)
* /   multiply, divide
+ -   (binary) add, subtract ### 

I added the ### to the operators which interest us here, the sequence is of higher precedence than the binary add so adding i will be done to the whole sequence once it has been computed.

If you wish to keep in the range (i+1):5 you have to take care of a special case, where i is 5 as your sequence will become 6:5.

So finally your code could be:

for (i in 1:5){
    s <- min(i+1,5) # Per Ben Bolker comment
    for (j in s:5) {
      print(c(i,j))
    }
}

Which output:

[1] 1 2
[1] 1 3
[1] 1 4
[1] 1 5
[1] 2 3
[1] 2 4
[1] 2 5
[1] 3 4
[1] 3 5
[1] 4 5
[1] 5 5
  • why not s <- ifelse(i<5,i+1,5) or s <- min(i+1,5) ? – Ben Bolker Jul 22 '15 at 15:45
  • @BenBolker probably because I'm use to do more complex things within ifelse and like to see it as a if [...] else [...] block. s <- min(i+5,5) sounds a better solution, I'll edit. – Tensibai Jul 22 '15 at 15:48
  • @BenBolker I'm reluctant to put logic within assignment, in an algorithm it's easiest to represent an assignment after the logical choice has been done (my point of view, not a rule). – Tensibai Jul 22 '15 at 15:52
  • fair enough. Stylistic differences. The x <- if [...] else [...] idiom seems to be fairly common in R (ifelse has its own pecularities) – Ben Bolker Jul 22 '15 at 15:53
  • 3
    @BenBolker As I'm not an R expert and playing with a lot of languages I try to keep with the generic style every language will allow for this kind of case, so if condition assignment else other assignment is generally more portable from language to language :) – Tensibai Jul 22 '15 at 15:56
1

Maybe you intended to type

for(i in 1:5){
  for(j in (i+1):5)
    print(c(i,j))
}
#[1] 1 2
#[1] 1 3
#[1] 1 4
#[1] 1 5
#[1] 2 3
#[1] 2 4
#[1] 2 5
#[1] 3 4
#[1] 3 5
#[1] 4 5
#[1] 5 6
#[1] 5 5

The : operator is treated with higher priority than +. Therefore you have

#> (1+2):5
#[1] 3 4 5

whereas

#> 1+2:5
#[1] 3 4 5 6

However, even in the case of a definition of the delimiter of the inner loop with (i+1):5, you still have one output where the variable j exceeds 5. This occurs during the last iteration of the outer loop, where you have the inner for loop delimited by (j in 6:5) when i is equal to 5. In this last iteration of the outer loop, the inner loop will be decreasing - in contrast to the previous loops - with j going from 6 to 5.

Not sure if this helps resolving your problem, but I sure hope so.

0

Perhaps you mean for(j in 1:5) or for(j in i:5)? The displayed result is certainly the expected result of the displayed code and that seems consistent to me.

0

You forgot parentheses/overlooked operator precedence:

for (i in 1:5){
    for (j in (i+1):5)
    print(c(i,j))
}
  • 2
    did you test your answer ? for i = 5 the first j will be 6. (at least it should be noted) – Tensibai Jul 22 '15 at 13:42
  • @Ben Bolker: I think my inital answer was correct. i+1:5 is actually interpreted as i+(1:5). The paranthesis in your code sample is unnecessary. Instead I guess Angade was looking for (i+1):5. But the comment concerning i=5 is useful, thanks for that. – MarkusN Jul 22 '15 at 14:21
  • Sorry if I messed up your answer, but: OP wanted to know why j exceeded 5 in the inner loop, and indeed it would if i==5. Perhaps the issue is that it should be min(i+1,5):5. Feel free to roll back/edit appropriately. – Ben Bolker Jul 22 '15 at 14:25
  • 1
    Note that you still have one case (the second last output) where j exceeds 5, as discussed in my answer above. – RHertel Jul 22 '15 at 15:27
  • 1
    @BenBolker I rolled back to revision 2, as the statement in revision 3 was false :) – Tensibai Jul 22 '15 at 15:38

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