108

I have a question similar to this and this. The difference is that I have to select row by position, as I do not know the index.

I want to do something like df.iloc[0, 'COL_NAME'] = x, but iloc does not allow this kind of access. If I do df.iloc[0]['COL_NAME'] = x the warning about chained indexing appears.

1
  • what version of python and pandas are you using? I'm not getting a 'chained indexing' warning on PY3.4.2 with pandas 0.16.1. Is there anything special about how you construct the dataframe?
    – GG_Python
    Commented Jul 22, 2015 at 17:02

8 Answers 8

177

For mixed position and index, use .ix. BUT you need to make sure that your index is not of integer, otherwise it will cause confusions.

df.ix[0, 'COL_NAME'] = x

Update:

Alternatively, try

df.iloc[0, df.columns.get_loc('COL_NAME')] = x

Example:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np

# your data
# ========================
np.random.seed(0)
df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randn(10, 2), columns=['col1', 'col2'], index=np.random.randint(1,100,10)).sort_index()

print(df)


      col1    col2
10  1.7641  0.4002
24  0.1440  1.4543
29  0.3131 -0.8541
32  0.9501 -0.1514
33  1.8676 -0.9773
36  0.7610  0.1217
56  1.4941 -0.2052
58  0.9787  2.2409
75 -0.1032  0.4106
76  0.4439  0.3337

# .iloc with get_loc
# ===================================
df.iloc[0, df.columns.get_loc('col2')] = 100

df

      col1      col2
10  1.7641  100.0000
24  0.1440    1.4543
29  0.3131   -0.8541
32  0.9501   -0.1514
33  1.8676   -0.9773
36  0.7610    0.1217
56  1.4941   -0.2052
58  0.9787    2.2409
75 -0.1032    0.4106
76  0.4439    0.3337
6
  • My index is the result of some selection, and it is composed of not correlative integers:eg, [3,24, 34] ix[0] throws an error.
    – luna1999
    Commented Jul 22, 2015 at 17:16
  • @luna1999 Then maybe try reset_index first so that you can use df.loc[0, 'COL_NAME'], which causes no confusion.
    – Jianxun Li
    Commented Jul 22, 2015 at 17:17
  • 1
    @luna1999 I've updated my code using df.columns.get_loc, and it should work for you. Let me know if this is not the case.
    – Jianxun Li
    Commented Jul 22, 2015 at 17:24
  • @luna1999 You are most welcome. Glad that it helped. :-)
    – Jianxun Li
    Commented Jul 22, 2015 at 17:28
  • 1
    @JianxunLi thanks for the .iloc tip. However, I am puzzled about a thing (correct me if I am wrong): if df.iloc[4:7] = x returns a copy df with values [4:7] set to x, why df.iloc[4:7,df.columns.get_loc("C")] = x is setting to x to the original df? Commented Feb 17, 2017 at 11:15
63

One thing I would add here is that the at function on a dataframe is much faster particularly if you are doing a lot of assignments of individual (not slice) values.

df.at[index, 'col_name'] = x

In my experience I have gotten a 20x speedup. Here is a write up that is Spanish but still gives an impression of what's going on.

1
  • 2
    old, but one thing about df.at is that you cant for example take the last index using: df.at[-1, 'col_name'] = x instead it'll add a new row with an index name of -1.
    – WEVERETT
    Commented May 23, 2023 at 7:54
16

another way is, you assign a column value for a given row based on the index position of a row, the index position always starts with zero, and the last index position is the length of the dataframe:

df["COL_NAME"].iloc[0]=x
3
  • 4
    maybe add a brief discussion of how this is different than the other 4 answers and what the code is doing
    – Nate
    Commented Jun 25, 2018 at 17:13
  • 2
    For modern versions of pandas, you get a SettingWithCopyWarning when you try this (see pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/user_guide/…) Commented Nov 10, 2021 at 19:32
  • This works when we have specific index and we don't want to use reset_index. df.iloc[0, df.columns.get_loc('COL_NAME')] = x doesn't change the values if we have specific index rather than usual integer indexes.
    – Armin
    Commented Nov 4, 2022 at 1:10
14

If you know the position, why not just get the index from that?

Then use .loc:

df.loc[index, 'COL_NAME'] = x
2
  • 18
    df.loc is for label-based indexing, not for position-based indexing. You may be referring to doing something like df.loc[df.index[0], 'COL_NAME'] = x
    – noe
    Commented Oct 7, 2016 at 12:03
  • An example would be nice. You may copy gist.githubusercontent.com/MartinThoma/… Commented Oct 19, 2017 at 12:21
12

You can use:

df.set_value('Row_index', 'Column_name', value)

set_value is ~100 times faster than .ix method. It also better then use df['Row_index']['Column_name'] = value.

But since set_value is deprecated now so .iat/.at are good replacements.

For example if we have this data_frame

   A   B   C
0  1   8   4 
1  3   9   6
2  22 33  52

if we want to modify the value of the cell [0,"A"] we can do

df.iat[0,0] = 2

or df.at[0,'A'] = 2

2
  • 4
    I mentioned that set_value is deprecated be carefull and read the answer well before decide to downvote blindly Commented Dec 12, 2020 at 1:06
  • It has been seiad in this line => But since set_value is deprecated now so .iat/.at are good replacements. Commented May 21, 2021 at 15:31
5

To modify the value in a cell at the intersection of row "r" (in column "A") and column "C"

  1. retrieve the index of the row "r" in column "A"

        i = df[ df['A']=='r' ].index.values[0]
    
  2. modify the value in the desired column "C"

        df.loc[i,"C"]="newValue"
    

Note: before, be sure to reset the index of rows ...to have a nice index list!

        df=df.reset_index(drop=True)
4

Another way is to get the row index and then use df.loc or df.at.

# get row index 'label' from row number 'irow'
label = df.index.values[irow] 
df.at[label, 'COL_NAME'] = x
1
  • This is the best solution when you want to set multiple rows to the same value
    – Riebeckite
    Commented Nov 13, 2020 at 18:01
1

Extending Jianxun's answer, using set_value mehtod in pandas. It sets value for a column at given index.

From pandas documentations:

DataFrame.set_value(index, col, value)

To set value at particular index for a column, do:

df.set_value(index, 'COL_NAME', x)

Hope it helps.

1
  • set_value is depreciated. Better to us "at"
    – Sadhun
    Commented Jul 24, 2019 at 10:58

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