0

I have this "tree".

It is a multi-dimensional object. Each "node" has at most two properties, which are data and children.

Here's an example:

{Account: { data: ['stuff'], children: {
  share: {data: ['stuff'], children: {
    share name: {},
    share hold: { data: ['stuff'] }   
  }},
  card: { children: {
    card_access: { data: ['stuff'] } 
  }},
  loan: { children: {
    loan_name: {}
  }}
}}

I need to remove any nodes who don't have a data attribute and also don't have any children with a data attribute.

So, the above example would become:

{Account: { data: ['stuff'], children: {
  share: {data: ['stuff'], children: {
    share hold: { data: ['stuff'] }   
  }},
  card: { children: {
    card_access: { data: ['stuff'] } 
  }},
}}

What is the most concise way to achieve this in JS?

4
  • Have you tried anything? Sounds like a fairly straightforward recursion problem. – Madara's Ghost Jul 22 '15 at 21:24
  • @MadaraUchiha Its been giving me issues because of the fact that I cant just ditch a branch If it doesn't have the property, I need to check its children recursively as well. (its like recursion within recursion) My code is becoming verbose and I feel like there's a bunch of different ways to do these types of problems and I could learn from seeing other peoples, likely more concise solutions. – Luke Jul 22 '15 at 21:26
  • Huh? Create a function allEmpty that checks if a. this object's data is empty and b. this object's children all pass allEmpty. allEmpty should return a boolean. You have a double recursion here. – Madara's Ghost Jul 22 '15 at 21:28
  • Thats actually what I'm in the process of doing now, it stuck me as I was typing the question, but I still wanted to see others solutions. Ill post mine when I get back into work tomorrow. For now, its quittin' time. – Luke Jul 22 '15 at 21:29
1

This does the trick:

function trimEmpty(obj) {
  for(var o in obj) {
    if(typeof obj[o] === 'object') trimEmpty(obj[o]);
    if(JSON.stringify(obj[o]) === '{}') delete obj[o];
  }
} //trimEmpty

trimEmpty(obj);

Snippet:

var obj = {
  Account: {
    data: ['stuff'],
    children: {
      share: {
        data: ['stuff'],
        children: {
          share_name: {},
          share_hold: {
            data: ['stuff']
          }
        }
      },
      card: {
        children: {
          card_access: {
            data: ['stuff']
          }
        }
      },
      loan: {
        children: {
          loan_name: {}
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

function trimEmpty(obj) {
  for(var o in obj) {
    if(typeof obj[o] === 'object') trimEmpty(obj[o]);
    if(JSON.stringify(obj[o]) === '{}') delete obj[o];
  }
} //trimEmpty

trimEmpty(obj);
document.querySelector('pre').innerHTML= JSON.stringify(obj, null, 2);
<pre></pre>

1
  • 1
    Ah! Exactly why I asked this question, I learned a new pattern! Making the recursive call first effectively gives you bottom-up tree traversal. – Luke Jul 23 '15 at 14:03

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