34

Suppose, I have declared a vector in C++ like this:

vector<int>numbers = {4,5,3,2,5,42};

I can iterate it through the following code:

for (vector<int>::iterator it = numbers.begin(); it!=numbers.end(); it++){
    // code goes here
}

Now, I would talk about coding in the block of for loop.

I can access and change any value using this iterator. say, I want to increase every value by 10 and the print. So, the code would be:

*it+=10;
cout << *it << endl;

I can print the address of both iterator and elements that are being iterated.

Address of iterator can be printed by:

cout << &it << endl;

Address of iterated elements can be printed by:

cout << &(*it) << endl;

But why the iterator itself could not printed by doing the following?

cout << it <<endl;

At first I thought the convention came from JAVA considering the security purpose. But if it is, then why I could print it's address?

However, Is there any other way to do this? If not, why?

21
  • 6
    It's just because the iterator has no implicit conversion to any data type accepted by operator<<. An iterator acts like a pointer, but it is a distinct type. Just use cout << &*it (as you've already noted)
    – Ben Voigt
    Jul 22, 2015 at 22:00
  • there does not exist operator <<(ostream&, iterator of your choice)
    – Creris
    Jul 22, 2015 at 22:01
  • 1
    @manetsus: To do what? Print an iterator? First you have to define what it means to print an iterator. Jul 22, 2015 at 22:06
  • 1
    @manetsus: It's already been explained to you why. In Baum mit Augen's answer. Jul 22, 2015 at 22:38
  • 1
    @manetsus: The problem is explained in Baum's answer. "there is no conventional meaning of printing an iterator". Jul 22, 2015 at 23:43

5 Answers 5

25

Yes, there is a way to do it!

You can't print the iterator because it is not defined to have a value. But you can perform arithematic operations on them and that helps you to print the value (of the iterator).

Do the following.

cout << it - v.begin();  

Example:

#include <iostream>     
#include <algorithm>    
#include <vector> 
#include <iterator>

using namespace std;

int main () {
  vector<int> v = {20,3,98,34,20,11,101,201};           
  sort (v.begin(), v.end());                

  vector<int>::iterator low,up;
  low = lower_bound (v.begin(), v.end(), 20);          
  up = upper_bound (v.begin(), v.end(), 20);                  

  std::cout << "lower_bound at position " << (low - v.begin()) << std::endl;
  std::cout << "upper_bound at position " << (up - v.begin()) << std::endl;

  return 0;
}

Output of the above code:

lower_bound at position 2
upper_bound at position 4

Note: this is just a way to get things done and no way I have claimed that we can print the iterator.

...

3
4

There is no predefined output operator for the standard iterators because there is no conventional meaning of printing an iterator. What would you expect such an operation to print? While you seem to expect to see the address of the object the iterator refers to, I find that not clear at all.

There is no universal answer to that, so the committee decided not to add a those operators. (The last half sentence is a guess, I am not part of the committee.)

If you want to print those iterators, I would define a function like print(Iterator); (or something like this, whatever fits your needs) that does what you want. I would not add an operator << for iterators for the reason I mentioned above.

21
  • 3
    The offset or distance from the beginning may be more useful, something like std::distance(it, numbers.begin()). Jul 22, 2015 at 22:08
  • 1
    @ThomasMatthews Would be reasonable too, but how would an iterator know where its range begins?
    – Baum mit Augen
    Jul 22, 2015 at 22:09
  • 1
    @ThomasMatthews: I think that might lead to some hard to trace bugs, especially, if you have a container holding integers. I'd much rather have a compiler error. Jul 22, 2015 at 22:12
  • 1
    @manetsus: I've never had difficulty debugging because I couldn't print an iterator directly to an ostream. The debugger knows how to handle standard iterators, and can output all kinds of information from them. Even if I were to resort to printf/cout style debugging, I can easily form whatever expression I need to see the result of, whether it's *it or &it or &*it or distance(it1, it2). Jul 22, 2015 at 22:32
  • 2
    @manetsus not without traversing the whole list again to find your iterator, counting as you go. Note that merely keeping a counter inside the iterator won't work, because you can remove objects from the list while you're iterating. Such heavy functionalities with little gain are avoided in C++. I don't know about Java (and I don't know why you keep bringing it up either).
    – Quentin
    Jul 22, 2015 at 23:39
0

why the iterator itself could not printed by doing the following?

Because, it is not defined to a value internally.

Is there any other way to do this?

Basically, the compiler does not facilitate it by default, you may try to edit the compiler code! But it is too terrific you know!

If not, why?

Because it has no well-defined way to express it.

0

What I understand is that, you just want to know the position where the iterator points. If so you can use std::distance(numbers.begin(), it)

-4

You can't print the iterator because it is not defined to have a value. But you can perform arithematic operations on them and that helps you to print the value (of the iterator).

1
  • 5
    This is exactly the first sentence of the most upvoted answer May 31, 2021 at 10:50

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