The type assertion would involve call to runtime.assertE2T or runtime.assertE2I (you could see the assembly codes).

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "time"
)

type I interface {
    echo()
}

type A struct{}

func (a *A) echo() {}

type testfn func()

func run(f testfn) {
    ts := time.Now()
    f()
    te := time.Now()
    fmt.Println(te.Sub(ts))
}

func testE2T() {
    var i interface{} = new(A)
    for a := 0; a < 500000000; a++ {
        _ = i.(*A)
    }
}

func testE2I() {
    var i interface{} = new(A)
    for a := 0; a < 500000000; a++ {
        _ = i.(I)
    }
}

func main() {
    fmt.Println("testE2I:")
    run(testE2I)
    fmt.Println("testE2T:")
    run(testE2T)
}

result:

testE2I:
11.065225934s
testE2T:
5.720773381s

It seems that the type assertion is slower than the pointer cast in C? How to explain it?

And it's strange that when I use gccgo to run the same program, it would cause out-of-memory error. Does the gccgo has some limitation in gc?

closed as unclear what you're asking by autistic, elithrar, TheHippo, Volker, Soner Gönül Jul 23 '15 at 12:58

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 4
    For a start, your approach at optimisation is completely backwards and wrong, hence a waste of time. Write a program that solves an actual real-world problem (seeing which is fastest doesn't count as an actual real-world problem). Then use a profiler to determine where the most significant bottlenecks are, and target them for optimisation. That way, you won't be guessing and possibly getting it wrong; when you get it wrong, you potentially push the more significant bottlenecks outside of your window of time (or possibly even computer resources). – autistic Jul 23 '15 at 3:18
  • @undefinedbehaviour not all things. we may choose programming language based on some points, like interface casting performance. – Jiang YD Jul 23 '15 at 4:03
  • 6
    @undefinedbehaviour, this question is abstracted from the real-world project, where the type assertion comes from the variant type access and cost many CPU time from profiling, especially compared to the C pointer cast version. The project itself is not possible to be shared with public domain. Every language has some points which are worth handling them carefully, especially for newbies. If you have some concrete points about the question, please help directly; if not, since not everyone here is guru, so please take it easy yourself. Thanks. – kingluo Jul 23 '15 at 4:03
  • 3
    What is the actual question? – kostya Jul 23 '15 at 5:28
  • 1
    By the way, please see the testing package for the Go standard way of writing and running benchmarks. – Dave C Jul 23 '15 at 15:15
up vote 4 down vote accepted

I can't quite figure out what's your main question, but I'll try to answer the ones you asked as best as I can.

It seems that the type assertion is slower than the pointer cast in C?

Yes, it is. Type assertions need to be safe at runtime, thus there is a number of checks they need to perform. It's even worse with interface-to-interface assertion, because you also need to ensure that the type implements the interface.

With that said, they can definitely perform better. In fact, here is comparison of your benchmark results on Go 1.4.2. vs latest dev version of Go 1.5:

  • Go 1.4.2: testE2I: 10.014922955s, testE2T: 4.465621814s

  • Go 1.5 dev: testE2I: 7.201485053s, testE2T: 287.08346ms

It's more than ten times faster now, and Go 1.6's new SSA backend might bring even better optimisations.

And it's strange that when I use gccgo to run the same program, it would cause out-of-memory error. Does the gccgo has some limitation in gc?

My guess it that it's gccgo's lack of escape analysis, but I may be wrong. I was actually able to run the benchmark with gccgo on my machine, but it consumed about 9 GB of RAM, which is everything but normal. I'm pretty sure that filing an issue about that wouldn't hurt. Anyway, here are the results with -O3:

  • gccgo: testE2I: 30.405681s, testE2T: 1.734307s

Faster on the concrete type, but much slower with interface-to-interface assertion.

  • Thanks for your reply. It's helpful. – kingluo Jul 23 '15 at 12:35

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