142

An interface in Java is similar to a class, but the body of an interface can include only abstract methods and final fields (constants).

Recently, I saw a question, which looks like this

interface AnInterface {
    public default void myMethod() {
        System.out.println("D");
    }
}

According to the interface definition, only abstract methods are allowed. Why does it allow me to compile the above code? What is the default keyword?

On the other hand, when I was trying to write below code, then it says modifier default not allowed here

default class MyClass{

}

instead of

class MyClass {

}

Can anyone tell me the purpose of the default keyword? Is it only allowed inside an interface? How does it differ from default (no access modifier)?

4
  • 5
    default methods in interfaces were added in Java 8. It's not an access modifier, it's a default implementation.
    – Eran
    Jul 23, 2015 at 4:56
  • 2
    @Eran don't you think, introduction of default method violating interface definition ? :s
    – Ravi
    Jul 23, 2015 at 4:59
  • 3
    It changed the interface definition. That definition is now out of date. Jul 23, 2015 at 5:00
  • 2
    They were introduced to support lambdas. The details of why they are required are in the straw man proposal for Project Lambda.
    – sprinter
    Jul 23, 2015 at 6:10

8 Answers 8

106

It's a new feature in Java 8 which allows an interface to provide an implementation. Described in Java 8 JLS-13.5.6. Interface Method Declarations which reads (in part)

Adding a default method, or changing a method from abstract to default, does not break compatibility with pre-existing binaries, but may cause an IncompatibleClassChangeError if a pre-existing binary attempts to invoke the method. This error occurs if the qualifying type, T, is a subtype of two interfaces, I and J, where both I and J declare a default method with the same signature and result, and neither I nor J is a subinterface of the other.

What's New in JDK 8 says (in part)

Default methods enable new functionality to be added to the interfaces of libraries and ensure binary compatibility with code written for older versions of those interfaces.

11
  • 27
    It seems, now interface and abstract class are almost same. :)
    – Ravi
    Jul 23, 2015 at 5:09
  • 25
    @jWeaver interfaces still cannot have constructors, fields, private methods, or implementations of equals/hashCode/toString. Jul 23, 2015 at 5:21
  • 11
    @Louis Wasserman: In Java 9, they can have private methods.
    – Holger
    Jul 23, 2015 at 8:15
  • 8
    @Dan Pantry: private methods are not really part of the interface, but may serve as helper methods for the default implementations or within constant initializers. Note that they already exist in Java 8, as, when you use lambda expressions within interfaces, synthetic private methods are generated. So Java 9 allows you to use that feature for non-synthetic, non lambda uses as well…
    – Holger
    Jul 23, 2015 at 10:28
  • 22
    @jWeaver The difference between interfaces and classes reduces to state vs behavior. Interfaces can carry behavior, but only classes can have state. (Fields, constructors, and methods such as equals/hashCode are about state.) Jul 23, 2015 at 19:27
41

Default methods were added to Java 8 primarily to support lambda expressions. The designers (cleverly, in my view) decided to make lambdas syntax for creating anonymous implementations of an interface. But given lambdas can only implement a single method they would be limited to interfaces with a single method which would be a pretty severe restriction. Instead, default methods were added to allow more complex interfaces to be used.

If you need some convincing of the claim that default was introduced due to lambdas, note that the straw man proposal of Project Lambda, by Mark Reinhold, in 2009, mentions 'Extension methods' as a mandatory feature to be added to support lambdas.

Here's an example demonstrating the concept:

interface Operator {
    int operate(int n);
    default int inverse(int n) {
        return -operate(n);
    }
}

public int applyInverse(int n, Operator operator) {
    return operator.inverse(n);
}

applyInverse(3, n -> n * n + 7);

Very contrived I realise but should illustrate how default supports lambdas. Because inverse is a default it can easily be overriden by a implementing class if required.

6
  • 8
    This isn't really correct. Lambdas may be the proximate cause, but they really were just the straw that broke the camel's back. The real motivation was enabling interface evolution (allowing existing interfaces to be compatibly evolved to support new behavior); lambdas may have been the factor that brought this need to the fore, but the feature is more general than that. Jul 23, 2015 at 16:30
  • @BrianGoetz: IMHO, both Java and .NET would have benefited enormously had default methods existed from the get-go. If some common operation could be performed upon any implementation of an interface using only interface members, but some implementations would likely have a more efficient way of doing them, the interface should define methods for those operations and provide default implementations for them. The inability to specify default implementations has induced pressure to have interfaces omit such methods, and has made it impossible for them to add them later.
    – supercat
    Jul 23, 2015 at 21:20
  • @BrianGoetz I agree default methods have significant value beyond lambdas. But I'd be interested in any reference you can give to that broader value driving the decision to include them. My reading is that lambdas were the primary reason (which is why I used the word 'primarily' in my answer).
    – sprinter
    Jul 23, 2015 at 23:53
  • 2
    Perhaps this document will help: cr.openjdk.java.net/~briangoetz/lambda/lambda-state-final.html. Section 10 says clearly: "The purpose of default methods (previously referred to as virtual extension methods or defender methods) is to enable interfaces to be evolved in a compatible manner after their initial publication." Lambda-friendly methods are then cited as an illustration of interface evolution. Jul 24, 2015 at 21:41
  • 4
    @Kartik You are asking the wrong question! We don't choose syntax based on "what is the absolute minimum that is needed for the compiler to parse the program correctly"; we choose it on the basis of "what would make the intent of the programmer more immediately evident to readers." We design first for users, and secondarily for compilers (and when it comes to users, we design first for reading, and secondarily for writing.) Apr 18, 2019 at 19:50
25

A new concept is introduced in Java 8 called default methods. Default methods are those methods which have some default implementation and helps in evolving the interfaces without breaking the existing code. Lets look at an example:

public interface SimpleInterface {
    public void doSomeWork();

    //A default method in the interface created using "default" keyword

    default public void doSomeOtherWork() {
        System.out.println("DoSomeOtherWork implementation in the interface");
    }
}

class SimpleInterfaceImpl implements SimpleInterface {

    @Override
    public void doSomeWork() {
        System.out.println("Do Some Work implementation in the class");
    }

    /*
    * Not required to override to provide an implementation
    * for doSomeOtherWork.
    */

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SimpleInterfaceImpl simpObj = new SimpleInterfaceImpl();
        simpObj.doSomeWork();
        simpObj.doSomeOtherWork();
    }
}

and the output is:

   Do Some Work implementation in the class
   DoSomeOtherWork implementation in the interface
2
  • 1
    We don't need to override. This is the key point. This helps me avoid editing N files with my new function. Thanks for the example! Oct 25, 2021 at 15:34
  • 1
    Question: What does that @Override annotation do when the immediate parent class is actually an interface ? Is that even required for first children of Interfaces?
    – navderm
    Feb 25 at 21:58
23

Something that was overlooked in the other answers was its role in annotations. As far back as Java 1.5, the default keyword came about as a means to provide a default value for an annotation field.

@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
@Target(ElementType.TYPE)
public @interface Processor {
    String value() default "AMD";
}

It usage was overloaded with the introduction of Java 8 to allow one to define a default method in interfaces.

Something else that was overlooked: the reason that the declaration default class MyClass {} is invalid is due to the way that classes are declared at all. There's no provision in the language that allows for that keyword to appear there. It does appear for interface method declarations, though.

9

Default methods in an interface allow us to add new functionality without breaking old code.

Before Java 8, if a new method was added to an interface, then all the implementation classes of that interface were bound to override that new method, even if they did not use the new functionality.

With Java 8, we can add the default implementation for the new method by using the default keyword before the method implementation.

Even with anonymous classes or functional interfaces, if we see that some code is reusable and we don’t want to define the same logic everywhere in the code, we can write default implementations of those and reuse them.

Example

public interface YourInterface {
    public void doSomeWork();

    //A default method in the interface created using "default" keyword
    default public void doSomeOtherWork(){

    System.out.println("DoSomeOtherWork implementation in the interface");
       }
    }

    class SimpleInterfaceImpl implements YourInterface{

     /*
     * Not required to override to provide an implementation
     * for doSomeOtherWork.
     */
      @Override
      public void doSomeWork() {
  System.out.println("Do Some Work implementation in the class");
   }

 /*
  * Main method
  */
 public static void main(String[] args) {
   SimpleInterfaceImpl simpObj = new SimpleInterfaceImpl();
   simpObj.doSomeWork();
   simpObj.doSomeOtherWork();
      }
   }
4

The new Java 8 feature (Default Methods) allows an interface to provide an implementation when its labeled with the default keyword.

For Example:

interface Test {
    default double getAvg(int avg) {
        return avg;
    }
}
class Tester implements Test{
 //compiles just fine
}

Interface Test uses the default keyword which allows the interface to provide a default implementation of the method without the need for implementing those methods in the classes that uses the interface.

Backward compatibility: Imagine that your interface is implemented by hundreds of classes, modifying that interface will force all the users to implement the newly added method, even though its not essential for many other classes that implements your interface.

Facts & Restrictions:

1-May only be declared within an interface and not within a class or abstract class.

2-Must provide a body

3-It is not assumed to be public or abstract as other normal methods used in an interface.

3

A very good explanation is found in The Java™ Tutorials, part of the explanation is as follows:

Consider an example that involves manufacturers of computer-controlled cars who publish industry-standard interfaces that describe which methods can be invoked to operate their cars. What if those computer-controlled car manufacturers add new functionality, such as flight, to their cars? These manufacturers would need to specify new methods to enable other companies (such as electronic guidance instrument manufacturers) to adapt their software to flying cars. Where would these car manufacturers declare these new flight-related methods? If they add them to their original interfaces, then programmers who have implemented those interfaces would have to rewrite their implementations. If they add them as static methods, then programmers would regard them as utility methods, not as essential, core methods.

Default methods enable you to add new functionality to the interfaces of your libraries and ensure binary compatibility with code written for older versions of those interfaces.

2

Default methods enable you to add new functionality to the interfaces of your apps. It can also be used to have a multi inheritance. In addition to default methods, you can define static methods in interfaces. This makes it easier for you to organize helper methods

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