43

Often, I can see a code constructs like following:

if(a == null || b == null || c == null){
    //...
}

I wonder if there is any widely used library (Google, Apache, etc.) to check against nullity for multiple objects at once, e.g.:

if(anyIsNull(a, b, c)){
    //...
}

or

if(allAreNulls(a, b, c)){
    //...
}

UPDATE:

  1. I perfectly know how to write it by myself
  2. I know it can be the result of the poor program structure but it's not a case here
  3. Let's make it more challenging and replace original example with something like this:

    if(a != null && a.getFoo() != null && a.getFoo().getBar() != null){
        //...
    }
    

UPDATE 2:

I've created a pull request for Apache Commons Lang library to fix this gap:

These will be incorporated in commons-lang, version 3.5:

  • anyNotNull (Object... values)
  • allNotNull (Object... values)
  • 3
    It's easy to write but I rarely encountered such a need. Did you consider the possibility that your data might be poorly structured ? – Denys Séguret Jul 23 '15 at 8:53
  • 1
    if you want this kind of direct null check, you can simply create utility by passing it in list and iterate on it. – Panther Jul 23 '15 at 8:55
  • 2
    @Panther A list ? A variadic function seems more relevant here. – Denys Séguret Jul 23 '15 at 8:55
  • @DenysSéguret yes that will be better – Panther Jul 23 '15 at 8:58
  • 2
    One problem I could see from this kind of code is that the exception you would be throwing could not actually tell you the name of the parameter that is null when it shouldn't be. – Sebastiaan van den Broek Jul 23 '15 at 9:00
25

EDIT 2018: As of Apache Commons lang 3.5, there has been ObjectUtils.allNotNull() and ObjectUtils.anyNotNull().


No.

None of Apache Commons Lang (3.4), Google Guava (18) and Spring (4.1.7) provide such a utility method.

You'll need to write it on your own if you really, really need it. In modern Java code, I'd probably consider need for such a construct a code smell, though.

  • 1
    That's a bit weird for me, as there are classes like Objects when they check e.g. for first not null object. But non of them checks for all or non null objects. – Krzysztof Wolny Jul 24 '15 at 6:53
  • @KrzysztofWolny Yeah, they are all designed for working with a single possibly-null parameter. I haven't ever seen a method dealing with multiple of them, nor do I think I ever needed it. That would be part of why I think the common libraries don't include them - the demand might be there, but it's probably not very high. But of course, every programmer works differently, so such a method might be exactly what you need. Feel free to file a feature request for your favorite library! – Petr Janeček Jul 24 '15 at 7:05
  • 2
    @Slantec will consider that, now with GitHub and its pull requests it's so easy :) And Apache has mirrors in GH as well. – Krzysztof Wolny Jul 24 '15 at 7:11
  • 1
    Actually, there is already a ticket for it in Apache Commons Lang project :) issues.apache.org/jira/browse/LANG-781 – Krzysztof Wolny Jul 24 '15 at 7:22
  • @KrzysztofWolny Aha, and it also points out that the Validate class contains almost exactly what you need. Not quite, but almost! :) – Petr Janeček Jul 24 '15 at 8:43
39

In Java 8, you could use Stream.allMatch to check whether all of the values match a certain condition, such as being null. Not much shorter, but maybe a bit easier to read.

if (Stream.of(a, b, c).allMatch(x -> x == null)) {
    ...
}

And analogeously for anyMatch and noneMatch.


About your "more challenging example": In this case, I think there is no way around writing a lazy-evaluated conjunction of null-checks, like the one you have:

if (a != null && a.getFoo() != null && a.getFoo().getBar() != null) {
    ...
}

Any of the other approaches, using streams, lists, or var-arg methods, would try to evaluate a.getFoo() before a has been tested not to be null. You could use Optional with map and method pointers, that will be lazily evaluated one after the other, but whether this makes it any more readable is debatable and may vary from case to case (particularly for longer class names):

if (Optional.ofNullable(a).map(A::getFoo).map(B::getBar).isPresent()) {
    ...
}

Bar bar = Optional.ofNullable(a).map(A::getFoo).map(B::getBar).orElse(null);

Another alternative might be to try to access the innermost item, but I have a feeling that this is not considered good practice, either:

try {
    Bar bar = a.getFoo().getBar();
    ...
catch (NullPointerException e) {
    ...
}

Particularly, this will also catch any other NPEs after accessing that element -- either that, or you have to put only the Bar bar = ... in the try and everything else in another if block after the try, nullifying any (questionable) gains in readability or brevity.

(I vaguely remember something about a notation like a?.getFoo()?.getBar() != null, but I can't recall whether it was a feature-request for Java or some entirely different language.)

  • 8
    Oh, that's actually a nice idea. Additionally, Objects::isNull could be used as a predicate. – Petr Janeček Jul 23 '15 at 9:05
  • ?. is not a Java operator, unfortunately... – Krzysztof Wolny Jul 24 '15 at 11:07
  • 1
    Nice, thanks for this solution. However I would replace x -> x == null with Objects::isNull. It's a bite nicer imo. – Pieter De Bie Oct 25 '17 at 6:33
  • And a version to check if any is null. if (Stream.of(a, b, b).anyMatch(Objects::isNull)) – Justin Mar 9 '18 at 8:33
12

You could also use something like the following method. It allows you to pass as many parameters as you want:

public static boolean isAnyObjectNull(Object... objects) {
    for (Object o: objects) {
        if (o == null) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

You call it with as many parameters as you like:

isAnyObjectNull(a, b, c, d, e, f);

You could do something similar for areAllNull.

public static boolean areAllObjectsNull(Object... objects) {
    for (Object o: objects) {
        if (o != null) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

Note: you could also use the ternary operator instead of if (o == null). The two methods shown here have no error handling. Adjust it to your needs.

  • 2
    For areAllNull, just return false if o != null? – tobias_k Jul 23 '15 at 9:36
  • @tobias_k: You are absolute correct. I deleted my comment and edited the code. – kamwo Jul 23 '15 at 9:47
  • why do you use Boolean instead of the primitive boolean ? – AlexWien Aug 4 '15 at 20:20
  • @AlexWien: You can use whatever you like (primitive or object). Change the methods to your needs. Sometimes you have to work with a lot of Boolean objects in an application. By using the Boolean.FALSE / Boolean.TRUE I receive static objects. This way there exist only two in the whole system and the system does not have to create new objects. Each time I call this method or another it will return me the references to the existing ones. – kamwo Aug 4 '15 at 21:33
  • @kamwo when you are using primitives the system also does not have to create new objects – Laurens Op 't Zandt Sep 22 '17 at 14:55
2

It is possible with help of Objects class

public static void requireNonNull(Object... objects) {
    for (Object object : objects) {
        Objects.requireNonNull(object);
    }
}
0

You can create a list of you objects and use yourList.contains(null) in it.

List < Object > obList = new ArrayList < Object > ();

String a = null;
Integer b = 2;
Character c = '9';

obList.add(a);
obList.add(b);
obList.add(c);

System.out.println("List is " + obList);

if (obList.contains(null)) {
    System.out.println("contains null");
} else {
    System.out.println("does not contains null");
}

DEMO

  • I just wonder is it ok space complexity wise ? – joey rohan Jul 23 '15 at 9:24
  • 2
    Nice. Or, to make it actually shorter than the original, use Arrays.asList(a, b, c).contains(null). Won't work for all-null, though... – tobias_k Jul 23 '15 at 9:31

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