1

I have dictionary:

dict = {"basic": {"last_name":["tomson", "brown"], "first_name":["paul", "max"]}}

And I would like to write function that convert it in this:

table = [["tomson", "paul"],
        ["brown", "max"]]

For terminaltables module:

from terminaltables import AsciiTable

table_data = [["last_name", "first_name"]]
table_data.append(table)

ascii_table = AsciiTable(table_data)
print "\n" + ascii_table.table + "\n"

With result:

+----------+-----------+
|last_name |first_name |
+----------+-----------+
|tomson    |paul       |
|brown     |max        |
+----------+-----------+

Please help me! I'm sorry for my English :)

3
  • 1
    table = [value for (key, value) in dict["basic"].items()]?
    – Delgan
    Jul 23 '15 at 14:09
  • Yeah, it works! Great! Thank you!
    – fudf
    Jul 23 '15 at 14:13
  • oh, no , this is wrong. it's my mistake. sorry
    – fudf
    Jul 23 '15 at 14:32
5

If you also need to "rotate" the list:

table = [list(reversed(x)) for x in zip(*dict['basic'].values())]
2
  • OP this is what you want
    – heinst
    Jul 23 '15 at 14:40
  • @darker0n If the reversed didn't give you what you want then you should change what you want in the question, because when I run with reversed I get [['tomson', 'paul'], ['brown', 'max']], which is what you said you wanted in the question. Without reversed I get [['paul', 'tomson'], ['max', 'brown']] which is different then what you said you wanted in your question
    – heinst
    Jul 23 '15 at 14:56
5

Based on your question the final list you want is a zip of the two lists inside the dictionary. To get the lists call values() and to zip call zip([iterable, ...]).

For some reason the zip output is reversed, so to get the original order you wanted you have to run each list through reversed.

The final code would be:

[list(reversed(x)) for x in zip(*dict["basic"].values())]

PS: As Daniel Roseman said calling the dictionary "dict" will shadow the built-in. That means that if after assigning the dictionary to "dict" you want to use the built-in dict in any way (e.g. transforming a tuple into a dictionary) the built-in won't be available.

5
  • great answer, but i have this: [("tomson", "paul"), ("brown", "max")]
    – fudf
    Jul 23 '15 at 14:41
  • 1
    If I run zip(*dict.values()) I get [('first_name',), ('last_name',)]
    – heinst
    Jul 23 '15 at 14:41
  • @heinst +1, same thing
    – fudf
    Jul 23 '15 at 14:43
  • I'm sorry, I forgot to add the ["basic"]. Now it should give the output you desire. Jul 23 '15 at 14:45
  • 1
    Indeed, for some reason zip reverses the output. Corrected the answer. Jul 23 '15 at 14:52
4

No need for the comprehension:

dict["basic"].values()

Also note it's a bad idea to call your variable dict, as it shadows the built-in dict function.

2
  • 3
    Actually, I was wrong and this answer is wrong because the values are not "rotated" as @valtuarte said.
    – Delgan
    Jul 23 '15 at 14:30
  • This doesn't give the OP the output he wants
    – heinst
    Jul 23 '15 at 14:37

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