227

Is there a c++ equivalent of Java's

try {
    ...
}
catch (Throwable t) {
    ...
}

I am trying to debug Java/jni code that calls native windows functions and the virtual machine keeps crashing. The native code appears fine in unit testing and only seems to crash when called through jni. A generic exception catching mechanism would prove extremely useful.

14 Answers 14

314
try{
    // ...
} catch (...) {
    // ...
}

will catch all C++ exceptions, but it should be considered bad design. You can use c++11's new current_exception mechanism, but if you don't have the ability to use c++11 (legacy code systems requiring a rewrite), then you have no named exception pointer to use to get a message or name. You may want to add separate catch clauses for the various exceptions you can catch, and only catch everything at the bottom to record an unexpected exception. E.g.:

try{
    // ...
} catch (const std::exception& ex) {
    // ...
} catch (const std::string& ex) {
    // ...
} catch (...) {
    // ...
}
  • 65
    It is a good practice to catch exceptions by const reference. As in: catch(std::exception const & ex) { /* ... */ } – coryan Nov 25 '08 at 1:18
  • 10
    @coryan: Why is it good practice to catch by const reference? – Tim MB Nov 9 '12 at 17:01
  • 17
    Avoiding unnecessary copies is one benefit. – Greg D Nov 10 '12 at 21:59
  • 18
    -1: the suggestion that this will "catch all exceptions in C++" is misleading. Try generating a divide by zero error inside the try block. You will see that it will generate an exception that is not caught, yet the code is clearly in C++. It would be more helpful to state that this will "catch all C++ exceptions" and then add some mention of structured exceptions to the notes on limited usefulness. – omatai Feb 5 '13 at 1:57
  • 37
    @omatai: Fixed, it will catch all C++ exceptions. Division by zero is undefined behavior and does not generate a C++ exception. – Mooing Duck Feb 28 '13 at 23:24
138

Someone should add that one cannot catch "crashes" in C++ code. Those don't throw exceptions, but do anything they like. When you see a program crashing because of say a null-pointer dereference, it's doing undefined behavior. There is no std::null_pointer_exception. Trying to catch exceptions won't help there.

Just for the case someone is reading this thread and thinks he can get the cause of the program crashes. A Debugger like gdb should be used instead.

  • 4
    Well, as Shy points out, it is possible with the VC compiler. It's not a good idea, but it is possible. – Shog9 Nov 25 '08 at 1:25
  • 7
    yeah with SEH. but not with sane standard c++ techniques :) well if you stick to windows you can nearly do everything :) – Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 25 '08 at 2:08
  • 1
    Mmm... thanks for this tidbit. I've been looking for the answer as to why my null-pointer exceptions aren't beeing caught! – Dalin Seivewright Aug 20 '09 at 11:15
  • 10
    You can catch segfaults with SEH on Windows and signal(2)/sigaction(2) on POSIX systems, which covers that vast majority of systems in use today, but like exception handling, it's not something that should be used for normal flow control. It's more of a "do something useful before dying." – Adam Rosenfield Oct 11 '09 at 16:03
  • 1
    @AdamRosenfield until you have implemented try { .. } catch(...) { ... } for catching using signal/sigaction, i wouldn't call it "catching" :) If in a signal handler, it's relatively hard for the programmer to know where in the code the crash happened (i'm talking about programmatically detecting that), compared to try/catch. – Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 22 '14 at 21:01
59

This is how you can reverse-engineer the exception type from within catch(...) should you need to (may be useful when catching unknown from a third party library) with GCC:

#include <iostream>

#include <exception>
#include <typeinfo>
#include <stdexcept>

int main()
{
    try {
        throw ...; // throw something
    }
    catch(...)
    {
        std::exception_ptr p = std::current_exception();
        std::clog <<(p ? p.__cxa_exception_type()->name() : "null") << std::endl;
    }
    return 1;
}

and if you can afford using Boost you can make your catch section even simpler (on the outside) and potentially cross-platform

catch (...)
{
    std::clog << boost::current_exception_diagnostic_information() << std::endl;
}
57
try {
   // ...
} catch (...) {
   // ...
}

Note that the ... inside the catch is a real ellipsis, ie. three dots.

However, because C++ exceptions are not necessarily subclasses of a base Exception class, there isn't any way to actually see the exception variable that is thrown when using this construct.

  • 23
    In C++11 there is: try { std::string().at(1); // this generates an std::out_of_range } catch(...) { eptr = std::current_exception(); // capture } – M. Alaggan Jan 1 '13 at 2:21
  • 2
    @bfontaine: Well yes, but I said that to distinguish the catch specifier from the existing code placeholder in a comment (// ...) which obviously isn't C++ syntax. – Greg Hewgill Jan 17 '14 at 17:12
  • 1
    @GregHewgill: yes, it was just typographic nitpicking. – bfontaine Jan 17 '14 at 21:23
  • 1
    @bfontaine: Fair enough. :) – Greg Hewgill Jan 17 '14 at 21:52
37

it is not possible (in C++) to catch all exceptions in a portable manner. This is because some exceptions are not exceptions in a C++ context. This includes things like division by zero errors and others. It is possible to hack about and thus get the ability to throw exceptions when these errors happen, but it's not easy to do and certainly not easy to get right in a portable manner.

If you want to catch all STL exceptions, you can do

try { ... } catch( const std::exception &e) { ... }

Which will allow you do use e.what(), which will return a const char*, which can tell you more about the exception itself. This is the construct that resembles the Java construct, you asked about, the most.

This will not help you if someone is stupid enough to throw an exception that does not inherit from std::exception.

28

In short, use catch(...). However, note that catch(...) is meant to be used in conjunction with throw; basically:

try{
    foo = new Foo;
    bar = new Bar;
}
catch(...)       // will catch all possible errors thrown. 
{ 
    delete foo;
    delete bar;
    throw;       // throw the same error again to be handled somewhere else
}

This is the proper way to use catch(...).

  • 5
    its better to using RAII for memory management that automatically handle this exception situations. – paykoob Mar 29 '14 at 7:14
  • 1
    @paykoob How does that handle cases where you manged to create a new foo but it failed on a bar. Or when the constructor of bar trys to open a file but fails and therefore throws. then you might end up with a dangeling foo – Mellester Dec 8 '14 at 18:39
  • 2
    @MelleSterk Wouldn't the stack still get cleaned up in that case, which would run Foo's destructor? I thought that was the whole point of RAII. However, if you need a pointer to a Foo rather than just creating the Foo on the stack, then you'd need to wrap the pointer in something else that is declared on the stack. – reirab Apr 4 '15 at 8:05
  • yes auto foo = std::make_unique<Foo>(); auto bar = std::make_unique<Bar>(); // is exception safe and will not leak, no catch(...) required – paulm Apr 13 '15 at 6:54
  • This answer deserves a vote if only for the discussion it started :) – Cristik Nov 4 '15 at 20:24
20

it is possible to do this by writing:

try
{
  //.......
}
catch(...) // <<- catch all
{
  //.......
}

But there is a very not noticeable risk here: you can not find the exact type of error that has been thrown in the try block, so use this kind of catch when you are sure that no matter what the type of exception is, the program must persist in the way defined in the catch block.

18

You can use

catch(...)

but that is very dangerous. In his book Debugging Windows, John Robbins tells a war story about a really nasty bug that was masked by a catch(...) command. You're much better off catching specific exceptions. Catch whatever you think your try block might reasonably throw, but let the code throw an exception higher up if something really unexpected happens.

  • 1
    I just caught some usages of these and peppered in some logging at that stage. Doing nothing with an exception is definitely asking for trouble. – jxramos May 9 '16 at 21:24
13

Let me just mention this here: the Java

try 
{
...
}
catch (Exception e)
{
...
}

may NOT catch all exceptions! I've actually had this sort of thing happen before, and it's insantiy-provoking; Exception derives from Throwable. So literally, to catch everything, you DON'T want to catch Exceptions; you want to catch Throwable.

I know it sounds nitpicky, but when you've spent several days trying to figure out where the "uncaught exception" came from in code that was surrounded by a try ... catch (Exception e)" block comes from, it sticks with you.

  • 2
    Of course, you should never catch Error objects -- if you were supposed to catch them they would be Exceptions. Error objects are completely fatal things, such as running out of heap space etc. – SCdF Nov 25 '08 at 2:03
  • 1
    Neither runtime exceptions which are most of the times GoodProgrammerExpected exceptions!!! – OscarRyz Nov 25 '08 at 21:21
  • 3
    We had a really serious bug caused by catching an OutOfMemoryError due to a catch(Throwable) block instead of letting it kill things... – Trejkaz Jun 28 '12 at 2:36
  • 1
    Of course catch(Exception) may not catch all exceptions in Java, you are getting it mixed up with C#... Java = catch(Thowable), C# = catch(Exception). Don't get them confused. – Chef Pharaoh Jan 9 '13 at 14:48
  • 2
    @OscarRyz That sounds like the CoderMalfunctionError (which is actually a real Java Error subclass... though it doesn't mean what it sounds like.) – reirab Apr 4 '15 at 8:01
9

Well, if you would like to catch all exception to create a minidump for example...

Somebody did the work on Windows.

See http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/207464/Exception-Handling-in-Visual-Cplusplus In the article, he explains how he found out how to catch all kind of exceptions and he provides code that works.

Here is the list you can catch:

 SEH exception
 terminate
 unexpected
 pure virtual method call
 invalid parameter
 new operator fault 
 SIGABR
 SIGFPE
 SIGILL
 SIGINT
 SIGSEGV
 SIGTERM
 Raised exception
C++ typed exception

And the usage: CCrashHandler ch; ch.SetProcessExceptionHandlers(); // do this for one thread ch.SetThreadExceptionHandlers(); // for each thred


By default, this creates a minidump in the current directory (crashdump.dmp)

5

A generic exception catching mechanism would prove extremely useful.

Doubtful. You already know your code is broken, because it's crashing. Eating exceptions may mask this, but that'll probably just result in even nastier, more subtle bugs.

What you really want is a debugger...

  • 12
    I disagree, there's plenty of cases in real time applications where I'd rather catch an unknown exception, write anything to a log/ pursue some generic error course of action, rather than letting the application crash. – f0ster Sep 13 '11 at 16:57
  • 3
    I rather suspect you're thinking of cases where you can pursue some generic error course of action, conveniently ignoring those where the stack is trashed or memory is exhausted and generic error-handling isn't going to succeed either. Nothing wrong with catching errors that you can recover from, but IMHO a catch-all should really exist only as isolated (separate stack, pre-allocated memory), carefully-written logic called just prior to program termination; if you don't know what the problem is, you can't be confident that it can be recovered from. – Shog9 Sep 13 '11 at 17:22
  • 1
    I.e. install a signal handler which unwinds some log you build during runtime to figure out where the program crashed and, hopefully, why. – Clearer May 26 '14 at 14:19
3
  1. Can you run your JNI-using Java application from a console window (launch it from a java command line) to see if there is any report of what may have been detected before the JVM was crashed. When running directly as a Java window application, you may be missing messages that would appear if you ran from a console window instead.

  2. Secondly, can you stub your JNI DLL implementation to show that methods in your DLL are being entered from JNI, you are returning properly, etc?

  3. Just in case the problem is with an incorrect use of one of the JNI-interface methods from the C++ code, have you verified that some simple JNI examples compile and work with your setup? I'm thinking in particular of using the JNI-interface methods for converting parameters to native C++ formats and turning function results into Java types. It is useful to stub those to make sure that the data conversions are working and you are not going haywire in the COM-like calls into the JNI interface.

  4. There are other things to check, but it is hard to suggest any without knowing more about what your native Java methods are and what the JNI implementation of them is trying to do. It is not clear that catching an exception from the C++ code level is related to your problem. (You can use the JNI interface to rethrow the exception as a Java one, but it is not clear from what you provide that this is going to help.)

2

For the real problem about being unable to properly debug a program that uses JNI (or the bug does not appear when running it under a debugger):

In this case it often helps to add Java wrappers around your JNI calls (i.e. all native methods are private and your public methods in the class call them) that do some basic sanity checking (check that all "objects" are freed and "objects" are not used after freeing) or synchronization (just synchronize all methods from one DLL to a single object instance). Let the java wrapper methods log the mistake and throw an exception.

This will often help to find the real error (which surprisingly is mostly in the Java code that does not obey the semantics of the called functions causing some nasty double-frees or similar) more easily than trying to debug a massively parallel Java program in a native debugger...

If you know the cause, keep the code in your wrapper methods that avoids it. Better have your wrapper methods throw exceptions than your JNI code crash the VM...

1

Well this really depends on the compiler environment. gcc does not catch these. Visual Studio and the last Borland that I used did.

So the conclusion about crashes is that it depends on the quality of your development environment.

The C++ specification says that catch(...) must catch any exceptions, but it doesn't in all cases.

At least from what I tried.

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