4

I have been trying to replace the characters in a string for characters stored in some arrays:

char encode_table[122];
char decode_table[122];

...

int main()
{
    memset(encode_table, 0, 122);
    memset(decode_table, 0, 122);
    ...

To populate the table, I use a file in the format

a b
c d

where a maps to b, c maps to d, etc. I store the mappings in the array, using as indices the ASCII values of the mapped characters.

encode_table[97] // Asking for the mapping of 'a'. Returns 'b'

After I map all the characters, I parse a file, line by line. Each line is processed by another function that is supposed to replace the characters that must be replaced and leaves alone the rest.

void display(char * filename){
    char buffer[255];
    FILE * file = fopen(filename, "r");
    ...
    while(fgets(buffer, sizeof(buffer), file){
        display_line(buffer);
    }
}

void display_line(char * line){
    char c;
    char c_r;
    char format_str[255];

    if(encode || decode){
        for(int i = 0; i < strlen(line); i++){
            c = line[i];
            c_r = (encode ? encode_table[(int)c] : decode_table[(int)c]);

            if((int)c != O){  // don't print empty chars in the buffer
                if(c == EOF){
                    break;
                }
                if((int)c_r != 0){
                    format_str[strlen(format_str)] = c_r;
                }
                else{
                    format_str[strlen(format_str)] = c;
                }
            }
        }
        printf("%s", format_str);
        memset(format_str, 0, strlen(format_str)); // reset char array for next iteration
}

As far as I can tell, the encode_table and decode_table are built properly (in this example, I'm only mapping English-alphabet characters to other English-alphabet characters. The mapping is 1-to-1):

encode_table:

{0: , 1: , 2: , 3: , 4: , 5: , 6: , 7: , 8: , 9: , 10: , 11: , 12: , 13: , 14: , 15: , 16: , 17: , 18: , 19: , 20: , 21: , 22: , 23: , 24: , 25: , 26: , 27: , 28: , 29: , 30: , 31: , 32: , 33: , 34: , 35: , 36: , 37: , 38: , 39: , 40: , 41: , 42: , 43: , 44: , 45: , 46: , 47: , 48: , 49: , 50: , 51: , 52: , 53: , 54: , 55: , 56: , 57: , 58: , 59: , 60: , 61: , 62: , 63: , 64: , 65: Z, 66: Y, 67: X, 68: W, 69: V, 70: U, 71: T, 72: S, 73: R, 74: Q, 75: P, 76: O, 77: N, 78: M, 79: L, 80: K, 81: J, 82: I, 83: H, 84: G, 85: F, 86: E, 87: D, 88: C, 89: B, 90: A, 91: , 92: , 93: , 94: , 95: , 96: , 97: z, 98: y, 99: x, 100: w, 101: v, 102: u, 103: t, 104: s, 105: r, 106: q, 107: p, 108: o, 109: n, 110: m, 111: l, 112: k, 113: j, 114: i, 115: h, 116: g, 117: f, 118: e, 119: d, 120: c, 121: b, 122: a, }

decode_table:

{0: , 1: , 2: , 3: , 4: , 5: , 6: , 7: , 8: , 9: , 10: , 11: , 12: , 13: , 14: , 15: , 16: , 17: , 18: , 19: , 20: , 21: , 22: , 23: , 24: , 25: , 26: , 27: , 28: , 29: , 30: , 31: , 32: , 33: , 34: , 35: , 36: , 37: , 38: , 39: , 40: , 41: , 42: , 43: , 44: , 45: , 46: , 47: , 48: , 49: , 50: , 51: , 52: , 53: , 54: , 55: , 56: , 57: , 58: , 59: , 60: , 61: , 62: , 63: , 64: , 65: Z, 66: Y, 67: X, 68: W, 69: V, 70: U, 71: T, 72: S, 73: R, 74: Q, 75: P, 76: O, 77: N, 78: M, 79: L, 80: K, 81: J, 82: I, 83: H, 84: G, 85: F, 86: E, 87: D, 88: C, 89: B, 90: A, 91: , 92: , 93: , 94: , 95: , 96: , 97: z, 98: y, 99: x, 100: w, 101: v, 102: u, 103: t, 104: s, 105: r, 106: q, 107: p, 108: o, 109: n, 110: m, 111: l, 112: k, 113: j, 114: i, 115: h, 116: g, 117: f, 118: e, 119: d, 120: c, 121: b, 122: a, }

When I try running the program on a text file, (most of) the characters seem to map to their correct mapping, but there is also a lot of garbage, especially in between characters in the original text file

Original:

For some reason, this program will not work.

Program output:

Uli hln?I?Uv iv4M1zhlm?I?U, gs4M1rh k?I?Uilti??%1zn droo mlg dlip.

Most characters seem to be correctly mapped ('Uli hln' is 'For som' in the original file, but then comes a bunch of garbage (?I?U), and then continues the mapping (v is e in the original), and so forth.

I've been staring at this for a couple of hours. Any ideas?

  • 2
    format_str[strlen(format_str)] = c_r; – it seems as though you expect format_str to be initialized to all zeroes. It isn't – it's uninitialized. also the reset is useless (it's a dead write). – The Paramagnetic Croissant Jul 23 '15 at 20:26
  • if(c == EOF){ c is a char. should be an int. (and need not be compared to EOF since it is already read in with fgets() ) – wildplasser Jul 23 '15 at 20:30
  • 1
    Also, if (c != 0) will never fail, because you use strlen() in the loop, which will truncate the line at 0. That's three strlen() calls inside the inner loop. You understand how awful that is? – Lee Daniel Crocker Jul 23 '15 at 20:36
  • Also, is there some reason you're rewriting tr? – Lee Daniel Crocker Jul 23 '15 at 20:38
2

Your code relies on strlen(format_str) to be set to all zeros initially. However, there is no memset for that. This is how the random "garbage" characters end up among the characters of the "good" output.

Although memset(format_str, 0, sizeof(format_str)) will fix this problem, adding a pointer or an index to which you are writing would be even better:

int j = 0;
...
format_str[j++] = c_r;
...
// After the loop is over, null-terminate the string:
format_str[j++] = '\0';
  • Thank you. That was very helpful. – TheJuan Jul 23 '15 at 20:53
2

strlen(format_str) yielding inconsistent values ought to be your issue; memset it before you start using it or use i instead.

Also, your encode/decode arrays are of size 122, but contain 123 elements as per your data; this is a buffer overflow which might cause memory stomping leading to unexpected behavior.

1

First problem is that your format_str is not null-terminated. The loop goes from 0 to 7 for a string containing 8 characters. So your very first format_str[strlen(format_str)] is already putting data into random memory, maybe even your encode table.

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