8

I'm using gedit and my complier is clang. I've been getting a couple of these errors recently and not sure how to fix (error in title and referring to the else statement).

 if(isupper(ptext[i]))
            if ((((ptext[i]+k)%26)+52) < 65 || (((ptext[i]+k)%26)+52) > 90)
            {
                printf("%c", (((ptext[i]+k)%26)+78));
            }
            else
            {
                printf("%c", (((ptext[i]+k)%26)+52));
            }

What should I add/remove/fix? Thanks in advance :)

4
  • Like the compiler is telling you: add some {} to make your intentions clearer. – John3136 Jul 23 '15 at 23:37
  • 4
    note: this is not actually an error, you must be using compiler switches that turn some informational messages into errors. – M.M Jul 23 '15 at 23:39
  • 1
    To improve your code readability, use symbolic constants such as 'A' instead of 65 and so on. – M.M Jul 23 '15 at 23:39
  • I don't see how the compiler's message is ambiguous or unclear. Did you consider following its advice? – Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 24 '15 at 0:01
11

Your outer if is missing the braces:

if(isupper(ptext[i]))
{
        if ((((ptext[i]+k)%26)+52) < 65 || (((ptext[i]+k)%26)+52) > 90)
        {
            printf("%c", (((ptext[i]+k)%26)+78));
        }
        else
        {
            printf("%c", (((ptext[i]+k)%26)+52));
        }
}

Personally, I would extract some of the common elements into variables:

char something1 = ptext[i];
if(isupper(something1))
{
    char something2 = (something1+k)%26;
    if ((something2+52) < 65 || (something2+52) > 90)
    {
        printf("%c", (something2+78));
    }
    else
    {
        printf("%c", (something2+52));
    }
}

And maybe even put a char something3 = something2 + 52; in there too. Of course, with more meaningful variable names.

1
  • 2
    @EthanT note the message is a suggestion, not actually an error. – user253751 Jul 24 '15 at 0:29
6

C is not like Python where it tells what belongs to what by indentation. Because in C, all white space is ignored. You need to use braces to tell the compiler which if statement the else belongs to.

The C compiler doesn't know, so it's asking you to specify:

Is it this?

 if(isupper(ptext[i]))
 {
            if ((((ptext[i]+k)%26)+52) < 65 || (((ptext[i]+k)%26)+52) > 90)
            {
                printf("%c", (((ptext[i]+k)%26)+78));
            }
            else
            {
                printf("%c", (((ptext[i]+k)%26)+52));
            }
 }

or this?

 if(isupper(ptext[i]))
 {
            if ((((ptext[i]+k)%26)+52) < 65 || (((ptext[i]+k)%26)+52) > 90)
            {
                printf("%c", (((ptext[i]+k)%26)+78));
            }
 }
 else
 {
            printf("%c", (((ptext[i]+k)%26)+52));
 }

This is an example of a "dangling" else.

3
  • 6
    The C compiler does know (it's the first one); it's just that the programmer may be wrong. ;) – Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 24 '15 at 0:08
  • 3
    The compiler knows because it understands the C standard — and the else is attached to the closest else-less if (so the code is unambiguously the first version). However, there's a possibility that the user intended the second — that's possibly an ambiguity in the user's mind (programmer's mind). – Jonathan Leffler Jul 24 '15 at 0:24
  • I guess I'm the programmer getting confused with the ambiguity then. This is why I never use multiline if statements without braces! – Jeremiah Dicharry Jul 24 '15 at 6:06

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