5

I've got a DTO object used to get data from my server. It can be used for one or several elements. This DTO encapsulate a Collection containing the data.

When my DTO brings me only one element, how should I store it?

Sample code:

public class DataDTO implements Serializable
{
    private Collection<Data> data;

    public DataDTO()
    {
    }

    public Collection<Data> getData()
    {
        return data;
    }


    public void setData(Collection<Data> data)
    {
        this.data = data;
    }


    public void setData(Data singleData)
    {
        // At this time I use an ArrayList initialized with a capacity of 1
        this.data = new ArrayList<Data>(1);
        this.data.add(singleData);
    }
}
  • What about using Array? – Arpit Aggarwal Jul 24 '15 at 7:51
  • One element is not a Collection :P – Fran Montero Jul 24 '15 at 7:52
  • I know that one element is not a collection, but I do not want to add a special DTO object just for the case where I've got only one element ^^ – Sara Jul 24 '15 at 7:54
  • @Arpit why would you want to do that? It wouldn't be a Collection. – Boris the Spider Jul 24 '15 at 7:55
  • @FranMontero a Collection containing a single element is still a Collection - it is a "singleton". You might argue that a singleton is an adapter pattern for a single element to the Collection API but that doesn't change the fact that it conforms to the Collection API and therefore is a Collection... – Boris the Spider Jul 24 '15 at 7:56
14

You can use singleton methods from Collections class.

singletonList : Returns an immutable list containing only the specified object. The returned list is serializable.

singleton : Returns an immutable set containing only the specified object. The returned set is serializable.

singletonMap : Returns an immutable map, mapping only the specified key to the specified value. The returned map is serializable.

| improve this answer | |
  • What are the differences in terms of memory space and performances ? – Sara Jul 24 '15 at 7:57
  • 1
    @Sara absolutely none. Take a look at the source code - the singletonXXX classes are just simple adapters to different interface types - you select one based on whether you want to use the Set API or the List API - Map is obviously not a Collection. – Boris the Spider Jul 24 '15 at 7:58
5

The question is, what do you want to do later with it? Is there a chance that you migh add another element? If not, you could use

this.data = Collections.singletonList( singleData );

If there is a chance that you might want to add elements later, then it's the typical question what List implementation to use, ArrayList is fine for many cases.

| improve this answer | |
  • Or Collections.singleton to the same effect. – Boris the Spider Jul 24 '15 at 7:53

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