7

I came across a code which my colleague uses inside an eventListner, which is :

private void someActionPerformed(java.awt.event.ActionEvent evt) {                                         
    new className().methodName(); //public class and public void methodName()
}    

I was pretty sure that :

private void someActionPerformed(java.awt.event.ActionEvent evt) {                                         
    className ref = new className(); //public class and public void 
    ref.methodName();
}

is the better option than his, as the previous method instantiates a class every time it is called.
Am I wrong? Any suggestion is appreciated, Please correct me if I am wrong .

8
  • "as the previous method instantiates a class every time it is called" so does the latter method...
    – tobias_k
    Jul 24, 2015 at 9:48
  • 1
    Both codes do the same.
    – Jens
    Jul 24, 2015 at 9:49
  • 1
    @tobias_k Yes it is. but we can use the reference further without instantiating it again and again. Isn't it?
    – mustangDC
    Jul 24, 2015 at 9:49
  • @Jens So what may be the differences between them?
    – mustangDC
    Jul 24, 2015 at 9:50
  • @mustangDC There is no difference.
    – Jens
    Jul 24, 2015 at 9:51

7 Answers 7

6

Both do the same thing, however one of them (the first) is 1 line shorter.

Your approach is usually recommended when you need to go through more than 2-3 objects, so new Foo().getBar1().getBar2().doStuff() is usually not recommended since it can degrade into spaghetti code and hinder the understandability of the code.

7
  • 1
    So except reusing the class reference afterwards, there is no difference memory wise?
    – mustangDC
    Jul 24, 2015 at 10:03
  • 2
    @mustangDC: No, in both cases the object created will be garbage collected the moment execution steps out of the method scope.
    – npinti
    Jul 24, 2015 at 10:06
  • What about : new Thread(){public void run(){}}.start(); ??? Sorry bcoz its a comment, so cannot format it.
    – Aman
    Sep 27, 2017 at 9:36
  • Yes this will create a thread( :-P ) but i want to know what it is called?
    – Aman
    Sep 28, 2017 at 4:23
  • @Aman: You can use: new Thread("myThreadName"){..., as per the Java Docs.
    – npinti
    Oct 2, 2017 at 5:23
4

The first code-sample instantiates a new Object of Type className.methodName. For this to work, methodName has to be a static nested class of Type className.
Attention: This could as well be a typo. Did you mean new className().methodName()?

The second sample creates a new instance of className and calls its method methodName.

Some example code:

public class Test {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new Test.test(); // instantiates the inner class

        Test t = new Test(); // instantiates Test
        t.test(); // calls method #test of Test-instance
    }

    public String test() {
        return "Test";
    }

    public static class test {

    }

}

In order to judge what's the best solution your example does not give enought information. Is the method some static utility code or is an instance of className useful? It depends...

7
  • The first one is like new Car().mustangGT(); and the 2nd one is like the basic what we have learnt
    – mustangDC
    Jul 24, 2015 at 10:05
  • no, the first one does not call a method mustangGT! it instantiates a new Car.mustangGT which has to be a static nested class - one could say mustangGT is a Car - mustangGt is not a method of Car
    – DaniEll
    Jul 24, 2015 at 10:11
  • Car is a public class and mustangGT() is a public static method : what I am taking about
    – mustangDC
    Jul 24, 2015 at 10:17
  • 1
    Then check your first code sample, it does not compile when mustangGT is a static method!
    – DaniEll
    Jul 24, 2015 at 10:20
  • Yes you are correct, it only works for static methods. Thanks for the correction
    – mustangDC
    Jul 24, 2015 at 10:23
3

Whenever an object is instantiated but is not assigned a reference variable, it is called anonymous object instantiation.

With anonymous object you can call it's instance method also:

new className().methodName();

In your case this is the anonymous object which doesn't have reference variable.

In the statements:

className ref = new className();
ref.methodName();

ref is the reference variable to hold the className object, so you can call instance methods of className on ref variable.

The benefit of using anonymous notation is, if you want to do only limited (may be calling single method and so on..) operation with the underlying object the it is a good approach. But if you needs to perform more operation with the underlying object then you need to keep that object in a reference variable so that you can use that reference to perform multiple operations with that object.

Regarding the performance there are not much difference as both are in methods scope, as soon as method completes both the objects are valid candidates for the garbage collection.

1

Both the methods instantiates a class in the code. If you want to reuse the class object every time the method is called, you can declare it as a member of the class where the method resides. For eg:

class AnotherClass{
    private ClassName ref;

    AnotherClass(){
          ref = new ClassName()
    }

    private void someActionPerformed(java.awt.event.ActionEvent evt) {
        ref.methodName();
    }
}

This way, everytime your method someActionPerformed is called on an object of AnotherClass, it will reuse the ref object instead of instantiating it everytime.


About the edit,

public class ClassName {
    static class InnerClass{
        // A static inner class
    }
    public void methodName() {
        // A method
    }
}

class AnotherClass{
    private void someActionPerformed(java.awt.event.ActionEvent evt){
        // This creates an instance of the inner class `InnerClass`
        new ClassName.InnerClass(); 
        // However I believe, you wanted to do:
        new ClassName().methodName();
    }    
}
5
  • So I guess except reusing class reference afterwards, there is no difference memory wise?
    – mustangDC
    Jul 24, 2015 at 10:01
  • 1
    @mustangDC no, not really. The only difference you may find is, just how npinti said, in the readability of the code. Other than that, there is no significant difference. Jul 24, 2015 at 10:06
  • We could also do new Car().mustangGT(); right ? Where Car is a class and mustangGT() is a method
    – mustangDC
    Jul 24, 2015 at 10:19
  • the code new className.methodName(); will work if methodName is actually a static inner class. Though I believe, you wanted to write new className().methodName(); Jul 24, 2015 at 10:23
  • ^that means that you want to instantiate the class className by calling the constructor with no params and then call the method methodName on the instantiated class Jul 24, 2015 at 10:24
0

new className.methodName(); --> if you are using this convention in your code then calling another method name will result to different object's method name and you lose your values.

className ref = new className(); ref.methodName(); -> here you are creating a reference and make assiging a newly created object and you are calling the method's on it. Suppose if you want to call another method on the same object it will helps.

The first approach they will mostly use for listenere which is anonymous class.

0
0

Both options create a new Class every time they are called. The advantage of the second over the first option would be if you wanted to reuse that class later in the method.

0

IMHO this is a little bit more understandable code for the answer provided by DaniEll

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new Test.test(); // instantiates the inner class
        Test t = new Test(); // instantiates Test
        t.test(); // calls method #test of Test-instance
    }

    public void test() {
        System.out.println("Outer class");
    }

    public static class test {
        public test() {
            System.out.println("Inner class");
        }
    }
}

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