25

I was doing one assignment, and I got this following question.

Where are the string objects created with the toString() method stored in memory?

String a = Integer.toString(10);
  1. In the constant pool
  2. On the heap (the area of new operator object)
8

This was an odd (I would say poor) interview question you were asked, because the answer to this question depends on the JDK's implementation. This implementation can change, and is not something a normal person would be expected to know about, because to find out for sure, you need to ask the implementers or read their source code. Also, as of Java 7, the string pool (which is what I'm assuming is meant by "constant pool") is on the heap. So even if it's in the string pool, it's still on the heap.

Currently (OpenJDK 8u40-b25), that String will be a new object created in heap memory:

public static String toString(int i) {
    if (i == Integer.MIN_VALUE)
        return "-2147483648";
    int size = (i < 0) ? stringSize(-i) + 1 : stringSize(i);
    char[] buf = new char[size];
    getChars(i, size, buf);
    return new String(buf, true);
}

Because you're passing 10, not Integer.MIN_VALUE, a new String object is created. The contents of this string are a char array that was created with new, so exists on the heap. intern() is not called on it, so it isn't put into the string pool.


You can test that this is the behavior you're getting by using the fact that == with Strings tests if they're the same object, not the same value. The following will evaluate to False, because the static Integer.toString() method created a new String object on the heap each time it was called:

Integer.toString(10) == Integer.toString(10)

If they had been interned into the string pool, they would be the same object (because that's the point of interning—having only one object per string). The following evaluates to True:

Integer.toString(10).intern() == Integer.toString(10).intern()

Note that this is an answer specifically for the static Integer.toString() method, not for all toString() methods. Boolean.toString(), for example, returns strings from the string pool.

  • Hi Dan, sorry if the quetion was not asked properly.. but I do intend to say that both are on heap ... your to string thery suggests that internally for tostring method of integer, the string object is created like a new operator, so by default no intern is called... so can i conclude saying that if string a = Integer.toString(1) is kept in a loop of 10 then 10 different string objects are created... – Prakruti Pathik Jul 27 '15 at 11:34
  • Hi Dan, sorry if the quetion was not asked properly.. but I do intend to say that both are on heap ... your to string thery suggests that internally for tostring method of integer, the string object is created like a new operator, so by default no intern is called... so can i conclude saying that if string a = Integer.toString(1) is kept in a loop of 10 then 10 different string objects are created... – Prakruti Pathik Jul 27 '15 at 11:40
  • Yes, that's my understanding of it. I didn't mean to criticize your question. It's an interesting question. I was criticizing that this was a question on an assignment you received, because this isn't something that someone using or studying Java should be expected to know. – Dan Getz Jul 27 '15 at 12:59
  • With assignment I didnt mean college assignments.. I am a java professional... This is one of the interview questions i was asked(I collected a series of questions asked to me in almost 10 interviews and started to solve them... only to know there is lot to learn)... I ended up saying that only one object is garbage collected... – Prakruti Pathik Jul 27 '15 at 13:02
  • Exactly, what I meant to say, then, was that I think this is a bad question for an interview, for the reasons I gave in my answer. @Boann 's answer goes into more detail about that. – Dan Getz Jul 27 '15 at 13:15
22

They all go into the heap memory. Only String literals and interned strings go into the String constants pool.

The only exceptions are classes like String:

public String toString() {
    return this;
}

It just returns the current string (if it is on heap, it returns from the heap / if it is on string constants pool, it returns from the string constants pool)

Note : If toString() is NOT overridden to return a String Literal explicitly, the String representation (ClassName@hexValueOfHashCode) is always created on the heap.

  • 4
    Also e.g. Boolean returns a literal. – Bubletan Jul 24 '15 at 10:40
  • 1
    This is about instance toString() methods, not the static method Integer.toString(). Or do you mean it applies to both? – Dan Getz Jul 24 '15 at 13:36
  • @DanGetz - In a general way... toString() is not guaranteed to intern strings and return them.. – TheLostMind Jul 26 '15 at 19:40
11

It depends on the implementation of the toString() method that you are calling.

The toString() method creates the String object, so depending on how it does this (and whether it interns the string or not), the returned String will be in the string pool or not.

Note that toString() is just a method like any other method. There is no magic that handles the return value of the toString() method in any special way. (Strings returned by toString() are, for example, not interned automatically). It works in exactly the same way as with any other method that returns a String.

  • hi jesper, I understand your point of tostring method. My question here is related to Integer's class to string method... The code snippet is as follows:for(int i=10;i>=0;i--){ String a = Integer.toString(1); System.out.println(tmp); } and I have to find out how many string objects are available for garbage collection.. when the code is out of reach.. i.e outside of loop – Prakruti Pathik Jul 27 '15 at 11:27
3

The question you were given is flawed.

First of all, the two options: (1) returning a string that's in the constant pool, and (2) returning a newly created string, are not mutually exclusive, because a method could create a new string, but then intern() it to get it into the constant pool.

Secondly, there are no particular requirements for how toString() methods go about supplying their strings in general. It's entirely up to the particular implementation of the particular toString() method. You can't generalize and say they all do a certain thing.

  • Some methods may return a new String(...) on every call (which would suitable for say, a StringBuilder).

  • Some methods may always return a string instance from a small set of fixed possibilities, and these fixed possibilities might also be in the constant pool (which is suitable for class Boolean or for enum constants).

  • Some methods may do a mix of things. Integer.toString(int) might use a set of predefined constants for small common values, but return new heap strings for more obscure values. Or it might generate and cache strings on demand, so that Integer.toString(10) could return a new heap string the first time, but return the same heap string on subsequent calls; and in that case, if a caller of Integer.toString somewhere .intern()s its return values, then the Integer class's on-demand-cached instances could thus also get into the constant pool.

The behavior could also vary depending on the JVM flavor or JVM version or runtime options that are passed to it.

To the specific question of what Integer.toString(int) currently does in OpenJDK 8, check the source:

public static String toString(int i) {
    if (i == Integer.MIN_VALUE)
        return "-2147483648";
    int size = (i < 0) ? stringSize(-i) + 1 : stringSize(i);
    char[] buf = new char[size];
    getChars(i, size, buf);
    return new String(buf, true);
}

It turns out it returns a string literal (which will be in the constant pool) for Integer.MIN_VALUE but a new heap string for every other value. (It may look odd but it is common for number-to-string functions in many programming languages to make an exception for the min value in this way, because with two's complement representation of integers the max value is 1 less than the absolute of the min value (e.g., range of -2,147,483,648 to +2,147,483,647) which means the min value is the only negative value you can't flip to positive and then process using the same shared loop code as for the positive values.)

The third problem with the question is that the answer would hardly ever matter. Only if you find the implementation of a toString() method is not working or has unsatisfactory performance, then you can investigate why, but otherwise, so long as it works, and works efficiently, why should anyone care how it caches strings or whether it caches them or not? Java newbies are made to worry far too much about the details of the silly string constant pool, which is an unfortunate side-effect of Java's poor decision to not have == call .equals() for objects, which makes the behavior of the constant pool more noticeable.

When you need a string that's definitely in the constant pool, you can intern it yourself, or write it as a string literal in the source. Otherwise, you have no guarantee whether it is or isn't in the constant pool, but also don't need such a guarantee.

Based on the implementation of Integer.toString(int), they are probably looking for the answer 2 ("on the heap") but it is a flawed answer to a highly flawed question.

1

I believe that it should depend on implementation. But for default toString from java.lang.Object and many other objects' toString implementations return only string literals. So I can tell you that they are in string constant pool because by default they are interned and all interned strings will be stored in string constant pool.

Example 1

public String toString() {
   return "my test string";  // will be in string constant pool
}

Example 2

public String toString() {
   String s1 = new String("my test string");
   return s1;  // s1 will be in heap
}

Of course I do not have to have to tell you that s1.intern() will put the example string in string constant pool if that is not already available

  • 2
    Object's toString() is not interned. Why should toString() return only literals?. – TheLostMind Jul 24 '15 at 11:06
  • 1
    Clearly wrong that Object.toString() returns a literal. Try new Object().toString() and you'll see. – Dan Getz Jul 24 '15 at 13:30
  • How do you say that object.toString() does not return literal ?? Object o = new Object();String s1 = o.toString();String s2 = s1.intern();System.out.println(s1 == s2); This returns true. What do you it means? – sakthisundar Jul 24 '15 at 17:52
  • how do you get that ? I am sorry to ask though. However the answer that interned strings are part of constant pool is right anyways. – sakthisundar Jul 25 '15 at 1:19
  • @DanGetz Even if s == s.intern(), it doesn't necessarily mean that s was already interned before the call to intern(). – Miles Jul 25 '15 at 7:37
1

In the Integer wrapper class, once the given int is parsed to char it will return a new String object.

return new String(buf, true);

this will create 1 string object in Heap Memory.

The reference variable "a" will point to the object in heap(normal memory).

But be remember that,

String str = new String("abc"); 

will create 2 objects, one in heap and other in String pool.

Compile time Constants Expressions of type String are always interned.

0

It's implementation dependent. However by default the string go to the string pool.

Case 1:

public String toString() {
   return "Constant Pool";  // String constant pool
}

Case 2:

public String toString() {
   String string2 = new String("Heap String");
   return string2;  // in heap
}

Both expression gives you String object, but there is subtle difference between them.

  • When you create String using new() operator, it always creates a new object in heap memory.
  • If you create object using String literal syntax, it may return an existing object from String pool if it's already exists. Otherwise it will create a new string object and put in string pool for future re-use.

When you create string using String literal notation, it automatically call intern() method to put that object into String pool(if it wasn't in the pool already). In case of new, it doesn't take place automatically, until intern() method is called on that object.

  • 1
    Neither example is related to the question, which was about the static method Integer.toString(). – Dan Getz Jul 24 '15 at 13:34
  • Why @DanGetz? The answerer touch the exact point of the implementation dependency and how it relates to the specific implementation. – Stas Jul 25 '17 at 9:15

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