72

I want to call a method exposed by a React component from the instance of a React Element.

For example, in this jsfiddle https://jsfiddle.net/r6r8cp3z/ I want to call the alertMessage method from the HelloElement reference.

Is there a way to achieve this without having to write additional wrappers?

Edit (copied code from JSFiddle)

<div id="container"></div>
<button onclick="onButtonClick()">Click me!</button>
var onButtonClick = function () {

    //call alertMessage method from the reference of a React Element! Something like HelloElement.alertMessage()
    console.log("clicked!");
}

var Hello = React.createClass({displayName: 'Hello',

    alertMessage: function() {
        alert(this.props.name);                             
    },

    render: function() {
        return React.createElement("div", null, "Hello ", this.props.name);
    }
});

var HelloElement = React.createElement(Hello, {name: "World"});

React.render(
    HelloElement,
    document.getElementById('container')
);
  • 3
    Not ideal, but JSFiddle is common enough that it doesn't warrant a down-vote. – Jeff Fairley Jul 24 '15 at 16:25
  • I'm wondering what could be your use case that would warrant such a thing. This isn't a good way to design your application imo. If you do need to resuse something, please create a separate common helper in a third file and use it for your button as well as your react component. – teaflavored Jan 21 '17 at 23:01
50

There are two ways to access an inner function. One, instance-level, like you want, another, static level.

Instance

You need to call the function on the return from React.render. See below.

Static

Take a look at ReactJS Statics. Note, however, that a static function cannot access instance-level data, so this would be undefined.

var onButtonClick = function () {
    //call alertMessage method from the reference of a React Element! 
    HelloRendered.alertMessage();
    //call static alertMessage method from the reference of a React Class! 
    Hello.alertMessage();
    console.log("clicked!");
}

var Hello = React.createClass({
    displayName: 'Hello',
    statics: {
        alertMessage: function () {
            alert('static message');
        }
    },
    alertMessage: function () {
        alert(this.props.name);
    },

    render: function () {
        return React.createElement("div", null, "Hello ", this.props.name);
    }
});

var HelloElement = React.createElement(Hello, {
    name: "World"
});

var HelloRendered = React.render(HelloElement, document.getElementById('container'));

Then do HelloRendered.alertMessage().

  • 9
    Note that using the return value of render is considered deprecated, and expected to be removed in future versions to enable performance enhancements. The supported way of getting a reference to your component instance object is to add a property ref which is a function called with the instance as a parameter. This also allows you to access objects that are not at the top level, e.g. if you're rendering <MuiThemeProvider><Hello ref={setHelloRef} /></MuiThemeProvider> you get the right reference passed to your setHelloRef function rather than one to MuiThemeProvider. – Periata Breatta Sep 30 '16 at 0:25
20

I've done something like this:

class Cow extends React.Component {

    constructor (props) {
        super(props);
        this.state = {text: 'hello'};
    }

    componentDidMount () {
        if (this.props.onMounted) {
            this.props.onMounted({
                say: text => this.say(text)
            });
        }
    }

    render () {
        return (
            <pre>
                 ___________________
                < {this.state.text} >
                 -------------------
                        \   ^__^
                         \  (oo)\_______
                            (__)\       )\/\
                                ||----w |
                                ||     ||
            </pre>
        );
    }

    say (text) {
        this.setState({text: text});
    }

}

And then somewhere else:

class Pasture extends React.Component {

    render () {
        return (
            <div>
                <Cow onMounted={callbacks => this.cowMounted(callbacks)} />
                <button onClick={() => this.changeCow()} />
            </div>
        );
    }

    cowMounted (callbacks) {
        this.cowCallbacks = callbacks;
    }

    changeCow () {
        this.cowCallbacks.say('moo');
    }

}

I haven't tested this exact code, but this is along the lines of what I did in a project of mine and it works nicely :). Of course this is a bad example, you should just use props for this, but in my case the sub-component did an API call which I wanted to keep inside that component. In such a case this is a nice solution.

  • 4
    I think you meant this.cowCallbacks.say('moo') – Steven Jul 19 '17 at 15:25
  • Thank you @rednaw saved my day! – yogs Oct 11 '17 at 6:53
  • BTW it is possible to pass this to callback (which will be an instance of Cow) instead of callbacks. – WebBrother Apr 10 at 8:39
  • @WebBrother Yes, but that would be even more hacky – gitaarik Apr 10 at 8:57
  • cowsay thankyou! – Martin Capodici Jul 25 at 22:51
18

You can do like

import React from 'react';

class Header extends React.Component{

    constructor(){
        super();
        window.helloComponent = this;
    }

    alertMessage(){
       console.log("Called from outside");
    }

    render(){

      return (
      <AppBar style={{background:'#000'}}>
        Hello
      </AppBar>
      )
    }
}

export default Header;

Now from outside of this component you can called like this below

window.helloComponent.alertMessage();
  • 1
    In fact, simple and functional! Like it is supposed to be. I am very impressed with how simple it is; really didn't think about. Probably this approach won't work that good if there are more and more components you should. Thank you! – Leonardo Maffei Sep 28 '18 at 17:19
  • 3
    Adding a global variable is not a good solution. More on why global variables are bad here: wiki.c2.com/?GlobalVariablesAreBad – Salvatore Zappalà Nov 30 '18 at 11:23
  • 2
    Thanks for down vote!! Yes global variable are not good but that's a way to solve your problem. – Kushal Jain Nov 30 '18 at 11:38
  • This is exactly the pragmatic and simple solution I needed, thanks ! – Florent Destremau Mar 12 at 15:09
  • 1
    it worked but it won't work if you have mutiple same component on the same page. – gaurav Jul 18 at 13:17
4

With the render method potentially deprecating the returned value, the recommended approach is now to attach a callback ref to the root element. Like this:

ReactDOM.render( <Hello name="World" ref={(element) => {window.helloComponent = element}}/>, document.getElementById('container'));

which we can then access using window.helloComponent, and any of its methods can be accessed with window.helloComponent.METHOD.

Here's a full example:

var onButtonClick = function() {
  window.helloComponent.alertMessage();
}

class Hello extends React.Component {
  alertMessage() {
    alert(this.props.name);
  }

  render() {
    return React.createElement("div", null, "Hello ", this.props.name);
  }
};

ReactDOM.render( <Hello name="World" ref={(element) => {window.helloComponent = element}}/>, document.getElementById('container'));
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react-dom.min.js"></script>
<div id="container"></div>
<button onclick="onButtonClick()">Click me!</button>

2

You can just add an onClick handler to the div with the function (onClick is React's own implementation of onClick) and you can access the property within { } curly braces, and your alert message will appear.

In case you wish to define static methods that can be called on the component class - you should use statics. Although:

"Methods defined within this block are static, meaning that you can run them before any component instances are created, and the methods do not have access to the props or state of your components. If you want to check the value of props in a static method, have the caller pass in the props as an argument to the static method." (source)

Some example code:

    const Hello = React.createClass({

        /*
            The statics object allows you to define static methods that can be called on the component class. For example:
        */
        statics: {
            customMethod: function(foo) {
              return foo === 'bar';
            }
        },


        alertMessage: function() {
            alert(this.props.name);                             
        },

        render: function () {
            return (
                <div onClick={this.alertMessage}>
                Hello {this.props.name}
                </div>
            );
        }
    });

    React.render(<Hello name={'aworld'} />, document.body);

Hope this helps you a bit, because i don't know if I understood your question correctly, so correct me if i interpreted it wrong:)

2

It appears statics are deprecated, and the other methods of exposing some functions with render seem convoluted. Meanwhile, this Stack Overflow answer about debugging React, while seeming hack-y, did the job for me.

2

If you are in ES6 just use the "static" keyword on your method from your example would be the following: static alertMessage: function() { ...
},

Hope can help anyone out there :)

  • You can not reach props or state in a static function. – Serdar Değirmenci Oct 5 '17 at 2:16
  • Ok yes, but the question was about to access the alertMessage() function so you could use HelloElement.alertMessage(). – darmis Oct 6 '17 at 9:20
  • Generally calling a function without using props and state has no effect. But as you are right about reaching function, I am removing my vote – Serdar Değirmenci Oct 6 '17 at 15:35
2
class AppProvider extends Component {
  constructor() {
    super();

    window.alertMessage = this.alertMessage.bind(this);
  }

  alertMessage() {
    console.log('Hello World');
 }
}

You can call this method from the window by using window.alertMessage().

1

method 1 using ChildRef:

public childRef: any = React.createRef<Hello>();

public onButtonClick= () => {
    console.log(this.childRef.current); // this will have your child reference
}

<Hello ref = { this.childRef }/>
<button onclick="onButtonClick()">Click me!</button>

Method 2: using window register

public onButtonClick= () => {
    console.log(window.yourRef); // this will have your child reference
}

<Hello ref = { (ref) => {window.yourRef = ref} }/>`
<button onclick="onButtonClick()">Click me!</button>
  • method 1 is a very easy and clean way to access child component methods. thanks! – gabdara Jun 25 at 11:17

protected by eyllanesc Aug 6 '18 at 3:18

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