175

I am trying to modify a DataFrame df to only contain rows for which the values in the column closing_price are between 99 and 101 and trying to do this with the code below.

However, I get the error

ValueError: The truth value of a Series is ambiguous. Use a.empty, a.bool(), a.item(), a.any() or a.all()

and I am wondering if there is a way to do this without using loops.

df = df[99 <= df['closing_price'] <= 101]
3
  • The issue here is that you can't compare a scalar with an array hence the error, for comparisons you have to use the bitwise operators and enclose them in parentheses due to operator precedence
    – EdChum
    Jul 24, 2015 at 20:21
  • df.query and pd.eval seem like good fits for this use case. For information on the pd.eval() family of functions, their features and use cases, please visit Dynamic Expression Evaluation in pandas using pd.eval(). Dec 16, 2018 at 4:57
  • 1
    @Ed "you can't compare a scalar with an array" - Sure you can; df['closing_price'] <= 101 will work just fine. That's not the problem here; the actual problem is that under the hood, x <= s <= y is handled as x <= s and s <= y, and the and causes the error for Pandas. Secondly, there's no equivalent using bitwise operators that doesn't require writing out s twice; instead, use Series.between.
    – wjandrea
    Oct 15, 2023 at 21:14

7 Answers 7

347

Consider Series.between:

df = df[df['closing_price'].between(99, 101)]
3
  • 3
    Is there "not between" functionality in pandas? I am not finding it.
    – dsugasa
    Apr 23, 2019 at 10:16
  • 9
    @dsugasa, use the tilde operator with between.
    – Parfait
    Apr 23, 2019 at 12:32
  • 12
    @dsugasa e.g. df = df[~df['closing_price'].between(99, 101)]
    – Jan33
    Dec 3, 2019 at 8:46
169

You should use () to group your boolean vector to remove ambiguity.

df = df[(df['closing_price'] >= 99) & (df['closing_price'] <= 101)]
0
35

there is a nicer alternative - use query() method:

In [58]: df = pd.DataFrame({'closing_price': np.random.randint(95, 105, 10)})

In [59]: df
Out[59]:
   closing_price
0            104
1             99
2             98
3             95
4            103
5            101
6            101
7             99
8             95
9             96

In [60]: df.query('99 <= closing_price <= 101')
Out[60]:
   closing_price
1             99
5            101
6            101
7             99

UPDATE: answering the comment (edited to fix minor mistakes):

I like the syntax here but fell down when trying to combine with expression:

df.query('(mean - 2*sd) <= closing_price <= (mean + 2*sd)')

My data is all within 2 standard deviations of the mean, so I'll do 1 instead to demonstrate:

In [161]: qry = ("(closing_price.mean() - closing_price.std())" +
     ...:        " <= closing_price <= " +
     ...:        "(closing_price.mean() + closing_price.std())")
     ...:

In [162]: df.query(qry)
Out[162]:
   closing_price
1             99
2             98
5            101
6            101
7             99
9             96

or

In [163]: mean = df['closing_price'].mean()
     ...: sd = df['closing_price'].std()
     ...: df.query('(@mean - @sd) <= closing_price <= (@mean + @sd)')
     ...:
Out [163]:
   closing_price
1             99
2             98
5            101
6            101
7             99
9             96
13
  • I like the syntax here but fell down when trying to combine with expresison; df.query('(mean + 2 *sd) <= closing_price <=(mean + 2 *sd)') Aug 21, 2017 at 11:42
  • 1
    @mappingdom, what is mean and sd? Are those column names? Aug 21, 2017 at 12:38
  • no they are the calculated mean and standard deviation stored as a float Aug 21, 2017 at 15:13
  • @mappingdom, what you mean saying "stored"? Aug 21, 2017 at 16:06
  • 2
    @ManojKumar, df.query('closing_price.between(99, 101, inclusive=True)', engine="python") - but this will be slower compared to "numexpr" engine. Mar 26, 2021 at 23:00
11
newdf = df.query('closing_price.mean() <= closing_price <= closing_price.std()')

or

mean = closing_price.mean()
std = closing_price.std()

newdf = df.query('@mean <= closing_price <= @std')
1
  • What do closing_price.mean() and closing_price.std() have to do with the question? And what does that mean, anyway, mean <= data <= std? I'm not a stats expert myself. Maybe you meant something like (mean - 2*sd) <= data <= (mean + 2*sd) as in MaxU's answer? (Which, coincidentally, I just added the @ syntax to.)
    – wjandrea
    Oct 15, 2023 at 21:03
6

If one has to call pd.Series.between(l,r) repeatedly (for different bounds l and r), a lot of work is repeated unnecessarily. In this case, it's beneficial to sort the frame/series once and then use pd.Series.searchsorted(). I measured a speedup of up to 25x, see below.

def between_indices(x, lower, upper, inclusive=True):
    """
    Returns smallest and largest index i for which holds 
    lower <= x[i] <= upper, under the assumption that x is sorted.
    """
    i = x.searchsorted(lower, side="left" if inclusive else "right")
    j = x.searchsorted(upper, side="right" if inclusive else "left")
    return i, j

# Sort x once before repeated calls of between()
x = x.sort_values().reset_index(drop=True)
# x = x.sort_values(ignore_index=True) # for pandas>=1.0
ret1 = between_indices(x, lower=0.1, upper=0.9)
ret2 = between_indices(x, lower=0.2, upper=0.8)
ret3 = ...

Benchmark

Measure repeated evaluations (n_reps=100) of pd.Series.between() as well as the method based on pd.Series.searchsorted(), for different arguments lower and upper. On my MacBook Pro 2015 with Python v3.8.0 and Pandas v1.0.3, the below code results in the following outpu

# pd.Series.searchsorted()
# 5.87 ms ± 321 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)
# pd.Series.between(lower, upper)
# 155 ms ± 6.08 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)
# Logical expressions: (x>=lower) & (x<=upper)
# 153 ms ± 3.52 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)
import numpy as np
import pandas as pd

def between_indices(x, lower, upper, inclusive=True):
    # Assumption: x is sorted.
    i = x.searchsorted(lower, side="left" if inclusive else "right")
    j = x.searchsorted(upper, side="right" if inclusive else "left")
    return i, j

def between_fast(x, lower, upper, inclusive=True):
    """
    Equivalent to pd.Series.between() under the assumption that x is sorted.
    """
    i, j = between_indices(x, lower, upper, inclusive)
    if True:
        return x.iloc[i:j]
    else:
        # Mask creation is slow.
        mask = np.zeros_like(x, dtype=bool)
        mask[i:j] = True
        mask = pd.Series(mask, index=x.index)
        return x[mask]

def between(x, lower, upper, inclusive=True):
    mask = x.between(lower, upper, inclusive=inclusive)
    return x[mask]

def between_expr(x, lower, upper, inclusive=True):
    if inclusive:
        mask = (x>=lower) & (x<=upper)
    else:
        mask = (x>lower) & (x<upper)
    return x[mask]

def benchmark(func, x, lowers, uppers):
    for l,u in zip(lowers, uppers):
        func(x,lower=l,upper=u)

n_samples = 1000
n_reps = 100
x = pd.Series(np.random.randn(n_samples))
# Sort the Series.
# For pandas>=1.0:
# x = x.sort_values(ignore_index=True)
x = x.sort_values().reset_index(drop=True)

# Assert equivalence of different methods.
assert(between_fast(x, 0, 1, True ).equals(between(x, 0, 1, True)))
assert(between_expr(x, 0, 1, True ).equals(between(x, 0, 1, True)))
assert(between_fast(x, 0, 1, False).equals(between(x, 0, 1, False)))
assert(between_expr(x, 0, 1, False).equals(between(x, 0, 1, False)))

# Benchmark repeated evaluations of between().
uppers = np.linspace(0, 3, n_reps)
lowers = -uppers
%timeit benchmark(between_fast, x, lowers, uppers)
%timeit benchmark(between, x, lowers, uppers)
%timeit benchmark(between_expr, x, lowers, uppers)
5

If you're dealing with multiple values and multiple inputs you could also set up an apply function like this. In this case filtering a dataframe for GPS locations that fall withing certain ranges.

def filter_values(lat,lon):
    if abs(lat - 33.77) < .01 and abs(lon - -118.16) < .01:
        return True
    elif abs(lat - 37.79) < .01 and abs(lon - -122.39) < .01:
        return True
    else:
        return False


df = df[df.apply(lambda x: filter_values(x['lat'],x['lon']),axis=1)]
1
  • Should point out that .apply is ideally a last resort since it's so much slower. See How to iterate over rows in a DataFrame in Pandas. Instead you could use a vectorized option, like say: from functools import reduce; from operator import or_; cs = [(33.77, -118.16), (37.79, -122.39)]; df[reduce(or_, (df[['lat', 'lon']].sub(c).abs().lt(.01).all(axis=1) for c in cs))]. (I made some other changes here too, like making it DRY.) Admittedly this code is pretty "sludgy", but it should be fast, and there are ways to write it that are more readable.
    – wjandrea
    Oct 15, 2023 at 21:44
5

Instead of this

df = df[99 <= df['closing_price'] <= 101]

You should use this

df = df[(99 <= df['closing_price']) & (df['closing_price'] <= 101)]

We have to use NumPy's bitwise logic operators |, &, ~, ^ for compounding queries. Also, the parentheses are important for operator precedence.

For more info, you can visit the link: Comparisons, Masks, and Boolean Logic (excerpt from the Python Data Science Handbook by Jake VanderPlas).

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