3

I see the Plugin class is now deprecated (as of 2.4.x version of play)... In the api documentation it says I should use modules instead... so that's my question. How do I write a module, and how do I plug that module into the play lifecycle of the main app?

3

You don't specify which language you're using, so I'll quickly cover both. I'm basing both answers on the following repositories:

Java

  1. Write your functionality any way you want - there are no specific classes to extend. If you have dependencies on Play components such as Configuration, you should inject them.

    @Singleton
    public class MyModuleCode {
    
        private final boolean enableWidgets;
    
        @javax.inject.Inject
        public MyModuleCode(final Configuration configuration) {
            this.enableWidgets = configuration.getBoolean("widgets.enabled", false);
        }
    }
    

Note that dependency injection is used in place of static reference. Also, note that I've given this example a @Singleton annotation, but it's also possible to have, for example, per-request scope.

See the Play DI docs for more information

  1. Expose the components of your module. To do this, extend the play.api.inject.Module class and implement public Seq<Binding<?>> bindings(final Environment environment, final Configuration configuration).

    package com.example.module;
    
    public class MyModule extends Module
    {
        @Override
        public Seq<Binding<?>> bindings(final Environment environment,
                                        final Configuration configuration)
        {
            return seq(bind(MyModuleCode.class).toSelf().in(Singleton.class));
        }
    }
    

Here, you can also bind implementations to interfaces, configure instance providers and so on.

  1. If it's something you're publicly releasing the module, let's assume you do this here - it's out of scope of the question. Let's also assume you've added a dependency for the module in whichever project you're working on.

  2. Enable the module in application.conf.

    play {
        modules {
            enabled += com.example.module.MyModule
        }
    }
    
  3. The components exposed via your module - just MyModuleCode in this example - is now available for injection into your controllers, actions, etc.

  4. If you need a shutdown hook, just inject ApplicationLifecycle into the component and register the hook; see https://playframework.com/documentation/2.4.x/JavaDependencyInjection#Stopping/cleaning-up for details.

Scala

  1. Write your functionality any way you want - there are no specific classes to extend. If you have dependencies on Play components such as CacheApi, you should inject them.

    @Singleton
    class DefaultPatternCache @Inject() (cache: CacheApi) extends PatternCache {
        override def apply(value: String): Option[Pattern] = cache.getOrElse[Option[Pattern]](key = s"Deadbolt.pattern.$value") { Some(Pattern.compile(value)) }
    }
    

Note that dependency injection is used in place of static reference. Also, note that I've given this example a @Singleton annotation, but it's also possible to have, for example, per-request scope.

See the Play DI docs for more information

  1. Expose the components of your module. To do this, extend the play.api.inject.Module class and implement def bindings(environment: Environment, configuration: Configuration): Seq[Binding[_]].

    package com.example.module
    
    import com.example.module.cache.{DefaultPatternCache, PatternCache}
    import play.api.inject.{Binding, Module}
    import play.api.{Configuration, Environment}
    
    class MyModule extends Module {
        override def bindings(environment: Environment, configuration: Configuration): Seq[Binding[_]] = Seq(bind[PatternCache].to[DefaultPatternCache])
    }
    

Here, you can also bind implementations to traits, configure instance providers and so on.

  1. If it's something you're publicly releasing the module, let's assume you do this here - it's out of scope of the question. Let's also assume you've added a dependency for the module in whichever project you're working on.

  2. Enable the module in application.conf.

    play {
        modules {
            enabled += com.example.module.MyModule
        }
    }
    
  3. The components exposed via your module - just MyModuleCode in this example - is now available for injection into your controllers, actions, etc.

  4. If you need a shutdown hook, just inject ApplicationLifecycle into the component and register the hook; see https://playframework.com/documentation/2.4.x/ScalaDependencyInjection#Stopping/cleaning-up for details.

Summary

Modules are no longer anything special - they're just a way of grouping injectable components.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.