27

I am reading this book, and it tries to use initializer to Create the DB each time the application runs, so the code snippet is like this:

protected void Application_Start() {
    Database.SetInitializer(new DropCreateDatabaseAlways<MusicStoreDB>());

    AreaRegistration.RegisterAllAreas();
    FilterConfig.RegisterGlobalFilters(GlobalFilters.Filters);
    RouteConfig.RegisterRoutes(RouteTable.Routes);
    BundleConfig.RegisterBundles(BundleTable.Bundles);
}

I can't understand this part:

 new DropCreateDatabaseAlways<MusicStoreDB>()

What is this syntax? what does <MusicStoreDB>() mean?

I know it's not a fancy question, but I need help here.

Thanks.

4
  • 1
    It's CodeFirst it means recreate the database whenever the application starts, MusicStoreDB is the database Jul 25, 2015 at 7:35
  • Hi toby, I know it's code first, I don't understand the C# syntax itself. Jul 25, 2015 at 7:49
  • If you do not understand C# syntax then it is probably better to start with some introductory book on that language before diving into MVC framework
    – lukbl
    Jul 25, 2015 at 7:53
  • I understand Generics, but the usage here had me confused, Thanks for others who clarified it in the answers. Jul 25, 2015 at 7:55

2 Answers 2

43

That syntax is called generics. In a nutshell (a very tiny nutshell), imagine that your app had more than 1 database (e.g. MusicStoreDB, MovieStoreDB, etc), you could use the same DropCreateDatabaseAlways class with the different db types. In other words, generics let you define classes and functions that can act on many different types, for example

List<int>, List<string>, List<MyAwesomeClass>

1
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    Oh ok :) Thanks for explaining .. I hope others would try to help as you do instead of voting questions down , much appreciated :) Jul 25, 2015 at 7:51
1

DropCreateDatabaseAlways is the database intializer base class. MusicStoreDB is the database which will be dropped and re-created everytime the application starts. DropCreateDatabaseAlways<MusicStoreDB>() is the code that does that

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