-2
public class App extends Application {
    public static App ctx;
    @Override
    public void onCreate() {
        super.onCreate();
        ctx = App.this;
    }
}

Then in every non contextwrapper inherited class that needs a Context i use it like App.ctx, Ive been using this extensively in my apps and was wondering, is this a good practice or can it lead to memory leak or any other unexpected results?

Regarding the answer provided by Aritra Roy :

  • There is no guarantee that the non-static onCreate() (where you are initializing) will be called before any static initialization which requires the Context

according to google docs :

void onCreate() Called when the application is starting, before any activity, service, or receiver objects (excluding content providers) have been created.

Hence, unless your app provide services to other apps which was not my case so far, it is garunteed that any call within your application flow would come after onCreate was called. And static blocks are not called unless needed so any static block would as well be called after onCreate was called.

  • Your calling code needs to be ready to deal with null values coming
    up because of this, which makes the entire thing more inconvenient

not relavant as App.ctx will never be null unless explicitly set to null anywhere on your own code. according to previous point.

  • This can lead to huge memory leaks issues

That is exactly what i was asking about, this statement can be true or false, but you didnt back it up so its useless. I was actually asking if it can lead and how can it lead to memory leaks.

  • Can't implement this static Context in a library project because you can't extend the Application object.

This is incorrect as ive done it myself and it worked well.

  • better to do with getApplicationContext(); – M D Jul 25 '15 at 12:56
  • As long as you only do this for the Application subclass I believe you are OK, it would be something else for Activities. – cYrixmorten Jul 25 '15 at 12:59
  • 1
    Needing this hack usually shows that your mixing your logic and GUI code. In most applications there should be no need to subclass application, nor making the application context globally available. – JohanShogun Jul 25 '15 at 13:17
  • @MD but you have to be within the context of a contextwrapper class which is almost never the case when i create singletons for examnple – Ofek Ron Jul 26 '15 at 14:19
1

IMO its bad practice. Because if you context for an object or a method of an object its there for a reason and you should pass the specific context that you (Activity,Service, etc.). I've been writing apps for 4 years and everytime i wrote/saw this type of static context was of lazyness. About the memory leaks- i havent checked it but it could lead to memory leaks. Think about it - if you create a View (i know you wont:) )or other object for example with a static context at the cuntructor (that implies that one of the members need a context attached , most likely) it wont get called by the GC even if its no longer on the activity.

1

I think it is okay. I have an Android library which implements the same idea (nv-android-base).

From my programming experience of 23 years, what should be blamed here is Android's library design. Although many application life-cycle models such as Applet, MIDlet and Xlet have been designed, implemented and commercially executed in this software industry so far, Android has failed to learn from the experience. Some parts of Android's library tree are terrible in design and android.context.Context is one example among such terrible parts. Android should have provided a means to get the application context from a static context.

-1

This is a bad programming practice. I will highlight few points supporting it,

  • There is no guarantee that the non-static onCreate() (where you are initializing) will be called before any static initialization which requires the Context

  • Your calling code needs to be ready to deal with null values coming up because of this, which makes the entire thing more inconvenient

  • This can lead to huge memory leaks issues

  • Can't implement this static Context in a library project because you can't extend the Application object.

  • I disagree with all of your points, i think you got it all wrong... the only point i still have doubt about is memory leaks, which you didnt give a good explanation how it can lead to such a leak... Sorry but i didnt find you answer helpfull – Ofek Ron Jul 26 '15 at 14:31
  • 1
    @OfekRon If you know the answer to the question, then what's the point of asking. Secondly, why don't you put up a good explanation proving why and how my points are wrong. – Aritra Roy Jul 26 '15 at 15:22
  • Any update on this? – Aritra Roy Jul 27 '15 at 9:22
  • there you go, see edit – Ofek Ron Jul 27 '15 at 11:57

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