11

I was asked to implement the Konami Code in a website I'm currently working on. It should do the following:

  1. Change Background Image

  2. Play sound

  3. Bring some pop-up

What's the easiest way to achieve this using javascript?

  • Have you looked at Java or JQuery. – hoss Jul 25 '15 at 13:29
  • Have you looked into the keydown/keyup event? I guess you could listen for a specific key sequence and then do your thing. – danillouz Jul 25 '15 at 13:35
30

Place the code below in a file js/konami.js and reference it in the body of your html file like this: <script src="js/konami.js"></script>

// a key map of allowed keys
var allowedKeys = {
  37: 'left',
  38: 'up',
  39: 'right',
  40: 'down',
  65: 'a',
  66: 'b'
};

// the 'official' Konami Code sequence
var konamiCode = ['up', 'up', 'down', 'down', 'left', 'right', 'left', 'right', 'b', 'a'];

// a variable to remember the 'position' the user has reached so far.
var konamiCodePosition = 0;

// add keydown event listener
document.addEventListener('keydown', function(e) {
  // get the value of the key code from the key map
  var key = allowedKeys[e.keyCode];
  // get the value of the required key from the konami code
  var requiredKey = konamiCode[konamiCodePosition];

  // compare the key with the required key
  if (key == requiredKey) {

    // move to the next key in the konami code sequence
    konamiCodePosition++;

    // if the last key is reached, activate cheats
    if (konamiCodePosition == konamiCode.length) {
      activateCheats();
      konamiCodePosition = 0;
    }
  } else {
    konamiCodePosition = 0;
  }
});

function activateCheats() {
  document.body.style.backgroundImage = "url('images/cheatBackground.png')";

  var audio = new Audio('audio/pling.mp3');
  audio.play();

  alert("cheats activated");
}

EDIT: changed the sequence to b, a instead of a, b. Thanks for the comment!

EDIT 2: reset the konamiCodePosition to 0 after activateCheats was called. Thanks for the comment!

  • Your key sequence is wrong ;D its 'b' 'a' not the other way around eheh. Not to be annoying but yea xD – José Pinto Jun 29 '16 at 19:01
  • 1
    You should set konamiCodePosition = 0 after calling activateCheats() to allow consecutive execution and avoid an exception at the indexer of 'konamiCode[]' – bytecode77 Jun 7 '17 at 20:32
  • Code will fail if input key sequence is: 'up', 'up', 'up', 'down', 'down', 'left', 'right', 'left', 'right', 'b', 'a'. Reason: on 3rd 'up', your code will correctly figure out that sequence has been broken but incorrectly set konamiCodePosition = 0 in else block. Instead, it should reset to '1' in my example input since incorrect key (third 'up') is also the correct first key. @w.stoettinger – Avi Dubey May 16 at 1:40
14

compact version:

function onKonamiCode(cb) {
  var input = '';
  var key = '38384040373937396665';
  document.addEventListener('keydown', function (e) {
    input += ("" + e.keyCode);
    if (input === key) {
      return cb();
    }
    if (!key.indexOf(input)) return;
    input = ("" + e.keyCode);
  });
}

onKonamiCode(function () {alert('\o/')})

  • How did you strip so much out and have it still work.? Going to talk myself through it. I see the key is the konami key code. The event listener is set. not sure what returning cb does. also what is keyCode? Sorry just trying to learn and understand how to clean up code. – riotgear Jan 11 '18 at 14:05
  • Key is a string with all the key codes in it 38 for up arrow, 38384040 means up up down down, every time, when user press the key, I add the key code as a string into input variable. return cb(); means: call the callback function, and leave cb(); return; would be the same effect, but this is shorter. next line I check input is part of the key indexOf function should return 0 in our case ! convert 0 to true if input part of the key we should return, and last line just reset the input and add the charcode to it – Peter Jan 11 '18 at 17:00
  • This worked great for me. Thank you very much. – Emma Dalby Feb 11 at 15:14
6

My own compact and cleaned version inspired by the answers here:

let cursor = 0;
const KONAMI_CODE = [38, 38, 40, 40, 37, 39, 37, 39, 66, 65];
document.addEventListener('keydown', (e) => {
  cursor = (e.keyCode == KONAMI_CODE[cursor]) ? cursor + 1 : 0;
  if (cursor == KONAMI_CODE.length) activate();
});

In this case, the activate() function is called when triggered.

1

Silentdrummer has a good answer. I'm not entirely sure, but I think it could end up taking up too much memory on typing intensive pages. It's good practice to reset. Either way, here's an alternative.

// Cheat Codes
neededkeys = [38,38,40,40,37,39,37,39,66,65], started = false, count = 0;
$(document).keydown(function(e) {
    key = e.keyCode;
    if (!started) {
        if (key == 38) {
            started = true;
        }
    }
    if (started) {
        if (neededkeys[count] == key) {
            count++;
        } else {
            reset();
        }
        if (count == 10) {
            reset();
            // Do your stuff here
            alert('Cheat Codes Activated');
            $('body').css('background-color', '#FFA8A8');
            // Turn down for what
            var s=document.createElement('script');
            s.setAttribute('src','https://nthitz.github.io/turndownforwhatjs/tdfw.js');
            document.body.appendChild(s);
        }
    } else {
        reset();
    }
});
function reset() {
    started = false;
    count = 0;
}
1

This is a solution I came up with around 3 or 4 years ago. In my case I chose keyUp to keep it separate from any actions that occur from keyDown events. Also there is no need to specify what keys are allowable since the for loop checks which key was released against all the keys on the keyboard.

var konamicode = [38,38,40,40,37,39,37,39,66,65];
var kc=0; 

function checker() {
   if (kc==10) {
    // What you want to occur when code matches goes in here. 

    kc=0;  // This resets the sequence. 
    alert("It Worked!");
   }
}

function keyUp(e) {
   var keynum;
     if (window.event) { keynum = event.keyCode; }
       else if (e.which) { keynum = e.which; }
        for (i = 0; i < 222; i++) { // The 222 represents all the keys on the keyboard.

    var kx=konamicode[kc]; // kx represents the current position in the code sequence.
    if (keynum == i) {
        // Checks to see if key matches sequence,  and resets sequence if it doesn't.
        if (i!=kx){kc=0;} else {kc++;}
    }
  }
 checker();
}
  • When posting code in an answer, please make an attempt to format it properly (for example, use correct indentation) so as to make it maximally readable for others – CertainPerformance Aug 3 '18 at 21:13
0

I really liked Peter's answer, so I made it namespaced and made the callback optional. I also used jquery because I like it ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

var Konami = Konami || {};

Konami.key = '38384040373937396665';

Konami.onCode = function(callback) {
    var input = '';
    $(document).on("keydown", function(e) {
        input += ("" + e.keyCode);
        if (input === Konami.key) {
            if(typeof callback == 'undefined') {
                return alert("⬆⬆⬇⬇⬅➡⬅➡🅱🅰");
            }
            else {
                return callback();
            }
        }
        if (!Konami.key.indexOf(input)) return;
        input = ("" + e.keyCode);
    });
}

Konami.offCode = function() {
    $(document).off("keydown");
}

Konami.onCode();
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

0

as a typescript module

const Konami = (() => {
    // up, up, down, down, left, right, left, right, b, a, enter
    const SEQUENCE: Array<number> = [
        38,
        38,
        40,
        40,
        37,
        39,
        37,
        39,
        66,
        65,
        13,
    ];

    let head: number = 0;
    let isActive: boolean = false;

    let callback: Function | undefined;

    const start = (cb: Function): void => {
        if (isActive) {
            return;
        }

        window.addEventListener("keydown", onKeyDown);

        callback = cb;
        isActive = true;
    };

    const stop = (): void => {
        if (!isActive) {
            return;
        }

        isActive = false;

        window.removeEventListener("keydown", onKeyDown);
    };

    const onKeyDown = (event) => {
        if (event.keyCode === SEQUENCE[head]) {
            head++;

            if (head === SEQUENCE.length) {
                if (callback instanceof Function) {
                    callback();
                }
                head = 0;
            }
        } else {
            head = 0;
        }
    };

    return {
        start,
        stop,
    };
})();

export default Konami;

implementation:

Konami.start(() => { alert("konami sequence entered!"); });

notes: SEQUENCE is an array of the expected inputs. by using the head var, the order checking and number of correct inputs is maintained. it also provides a simple way to restart if input deviates from the sequence. it also eliminates the needs for a "count" var.

0

To create your own "Konami Code" add the following Code snippet in your HTML Code. PS: Change the const secretCode to ... what ever you want :). With the current code you have to type 'arrow up' button, then 'h' then 'i' and last but not least the 'arrow down' button.

Questions? Please ask.

<script>
const pressed = [];
const secretCode = 'ArrowUphiArrowDown';

window.addEventListener('keyup', (e) => {
    console.log(e.key);
    pressed.push(e.key);
    pressed.splice(-secretCode.length - 1, pressed.length - secretCode.length);

    if(pressed.join('').includes(secretCode)) {
        console.log("Any quellcode that will be executed if you enter the correct code.");
    }

    console.log(pressed);
})
</script>

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