2

I have a list of objects. Each object has a DateTime property.

When I'm adding objects, to this list the DateTime is instantiated through ParseExact.

public class Event
{
    public Event(string time)
    {
         Time = DateTime.ParseExact(time, "HH:mm zzz", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
    }

    public DateTime Time { get; set; }
}

This allows me to add items like so:

Events.AddRange(new List<Event> { new Event("07:00 +" + timeZone), new Event("11:30 +" + timeZone), new Event("16:00 +" +timeZone), new Event("19:00 +" + timeZone), new Event("00:00 +" + timeZone), new Event("03:00 +" +timeZone) });

I'm using DateTime, because it handles the timezones in the background.

Problem is; I want to create a list that sorts the above list, with the current time.

so if the list had ["7:30", "5:12", "15:55", "22:22", "23:59"] and the current time is 22:19, it would sort it from that time. So it would be: ["22:22", "23:59", "5:12", "7:30", "15:55"]

I already have a function that does that:

Events.Sort((x,y) => x.Time.TimeOfDay.CompareTo(y.Time.TimeOfDay));

Problem is that, it's all the same day (Today).

To illustrate with the list above (given the date and time is 25/7 22:19, it would be:

["22:22 25/7", "23:59 25/7", "5:12 25/7", "7:30 25/7", "15:55 25/7"]

I hope this illustrates my point, as the date should turn to the 26th, past midnight, and so on...

Another thing is, that it returns a list as long as the input length, but ideally this could go on forever (hope this makes sense). It would be nice to be able to ask for 10 items, and it will return the next 10 items, from the current time.

Edit: Clarification I'm getting a list of DateTimes, only the hour and minute of the DateTime object is relevant. From this moment, I want to get the next 10, 25 or 50 DateTimes objects. This can be generated as the hours and minutes are the only relevant data in the datetime object. The items should then be ordered by now and so forth.

Edit 2: Timezones In above code, timezone = "0000", UTC. This will on the users end automatically convert the time to the users current location.

16
  • The code you've given wouldn't compile - did you mean Time = DateTime.ParseExact(...);?
    – Jon Skeet
    Jul 25, 2015 at 20:29
  • My apologies, that was exactly what I meant :)
    – Jazerix
    Jul 25, 2015 at 20:31
  • The rest of what you're trying to do really isn't clear to me, unfortunately - what do you mean by "as the date should turn to the 26th etc"? Do you mean you're trying to create the next 10 DateTime values starting from now, with times of day from the list? What do you mean by "time zone" here? I strongly suspect it may not be the same as mine. If you could make it clearer what you're really trying to achieve, I suspect there could be a much better way of achieving it. I don't think this is really about sorting at all.
    – Jon Skeet
    Jul 25, 2015 at 20:33
  • I've updated my question, hope this makes more sense.
    – Jazerix
    Jul 25, 2015 at 20:39
  • "I'm getting a list of DateTimes, only the hour and minute of the DateTime object is relevant." In that case, I suggest you don't store them as DateTime values at all. Within .NET types, TimeSpan is often used for time-of-day values - personally I don't like that, but DateTime isn't ideal either. (I'd use my Noda Time library and LocalTime, but that's a different matter.) Will think about the simplest way of achieving this...
    – Jon Skeet
    Jul 25, 2015 at 20:41

2 Answers 2

0

You can add 1 day to the dates if they're before the start dates:

Events.Sort((x, y) =>
{
    var xTime = x.Time;
    var yTime = y.Time;
    if (xTime < startTime)
        xTime = xTime.AddDays(1);
    if (yTime < startTime)
        yTime = yTime.AddDays(1);

    return xTime.CompareTo(yTime);
});

Note that I compared the dates, not the TimeOfDay, since the dates no longer have the same day.

This gives the expected result:

Before sort:

25/07/2015 07:30:00 
25/07/2015 05:12:00 
25/07/2015 15:55:00 
25/07/2015 22:22:00 
25/07/2015 23:59:00 

After sort:

25/07/2015 22:22:00 
25/07/2015 23:59:00 
25/07/2015 05:12:00 
25/07/2015 07:30:00 
25/07/2015 15:55:00 
2
  • After midnight should be 26 though, but it seems to be working like so on my end ^^ Thanks for the effort! Unfortunately this doesn't give me the option of keep on generating events, if that makes sense :)
    – Jazerix
    Jul 25, 2015 at 21:10
  • @Jazerix, "After midnight should be 26 though": the date displayed is the one from the event, which is not modified by the sort function. The date part in the event is meaningless, since you only want to store the time. But perhaps you should store the full date in the event, it would make it easier to sort. Jul 25, 2015 at 21:17
0

I ended up doing it like this. Following @JonSkeet, I switched to a TimeSpan object istead of a DateTime.

public List<Event> Events = new List<Event>();

public void InitializeTimers()
{
    Boss tequalt = new Boss("Tequatl the Sunless", BossPriority.HardCore) { Location = "Splintered Coast", Image = "tequatl.jpg" };
    Events.AddRange(new List<Event>
    {
        new Event("07:00", tequalt),
        new Event("11:30", tequalt)
    });
}

public List<Event> GetEvents(int count)
{
    InitializeTimers();
    var timeSpanPattern = Events.OrderBy(x => x.Time.Hours).ThenBy(x => x.Time.Hours);
    var newOrder = new List<Event>();
    var previousTimes = new List<Event>();
    foreach (var timespan in timeSpanPattern)
    {
        if (timespan.Time.CompareTo(DateTime.Now.TimeOfDay) != -1)
            newOrder.Add(timespan);
        else
            previousTimes.Add(timespan);
    }
    newOrder.AddRange(previousTimes);
    var finalList = new List<Event>();
    for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
    {
        int extraDays = i / (newOrder.Count);
        int current = i - (extraDays * newOrder.Count);
        if (newOrder[current].Time.CompareTo(DateTime.Now.TimeOfDay) != 1)
            extraDays++;
        DateTime time = DateTime.ParseExact(newOrder[current].Time.Hours + ":" + newOrder[current].Time.Minutes + " +0000", "H:m zzz", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture).AddDays(extraDays);
        var newEvent = new Event { Boss = newOrder[current].Boss, DateAndTime = time, Time = newOrder[current].Time};
        newEvent.CalculateCountdown();
        finalList.Add(newEvent);
    }
    finalList.Sort((x,y) => x.DateAndTime.CompareTo(y.DateAndTime));
    return finalList;
}

Given GetEvents(10) (date is 27-7-2015 and time is 11:00), it will return

[0] = Event.DateAndTime = "27-7-2015 11:30";
[1] = Event.DateAndTime = "28-7-2015 7:00";
[2] = Event.DateAndTime = "28-7-2015 11:30";
[3] = Event.DateAndTime = "29-7-2015 7:00";
[4] = Event.DateAndTime = "29-7-2015 11:30";
[5] = Event.DateAndTime = "30-7-2015 7:00";
[6] = Event.DateAndTime = "30-7-2015 11:30";
[7] = Event.DateAndTime = "31-7-2015 7:00";
[8] = Event.DateAndTime = "31-7-2015 11:30";
[9] = Event.DateAndTime = "1-8-2015 7:00";

It isn't pretty at all, but it get's the job done, and allows me to specify how many items I want.

If anybody knows how to optimize above, I will gladly accept it as the answer.

1
  • Aside from anything else, there's no need to do all that string parsing in the middle. Get the date, then add the timespan to it...
    – Jon Skeet
    Jul 27, 2015 at 10:17

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