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I'm trying to implement repository with Persistance and Domain models. My major goal is to seperate Domain Logic from other layers, like in Onion architecture.

As my repository, I use Entity Framework 6.2. To map between models I use Automapper.

I don't want to use entity models as my domain models.

I've readed a lot about concept and ideas around repository in DDD, browsed a lot of examples but none of them gave me an anwser how to deal with more complex models.

For example, in my playground console appliacation I have AppUser which contains BankAccounts. When I add new BankAccount to the user, I get an extra row with untracked BankAccount entity. That's because while mapping from Domain model to Persistance model (aka entity) EF is not able to say which BankAccounts are tracked and treats them all as new ones.

Before

+------------------------------------+
|Id |BankAccountNumber   |AppUser_Id |
+------------------------------------+
|1  |Seeded Bank Account |  1        |
+------------------------------------+

After

+------------------------------------+
|Id |BankAccountNumber   |AppUser_Id |
+------------------------------------+
|1  |Seeded Bank Account |  NULL     |
+------------------------------------+
|2  |Added Bank Account  |  1        |
+------------------------------------+
|3  |Seeded Bank Account |  1        |
+------------------------------------+

That's my code.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        CreateMappings();

        var appUserRepository = new AppUserRepository();

        var appUser = appUserRepository.Get(1);

        var bankAccount = new BankAccountDM
        {
            BankAccountNumber = "Added Bank Account"
        };

        var service = new AppUserDomainSerivce(appUserRepository);
        service.AddBankAccount(bankAccount, appUser);

        Console.WriteLine("== END ==");
        Console.ReadKey();
    }

    public static void CreateMappings()
    {
        // Config Automapper
        Mapper.CreateMap<AppUserDM, AppUser>()
            .ForMember(x => x.Id, opt => opt.MapFrom(y => y.Id))
            .ForMember(x => x.Name, opt => opt.MapFrom(y => y.Name))
            .ForMember(x => x.BankAccounts, opt => opt.MapFrom((y => y.BankAccounts)))
            .ReverseMap();

        Mapper.CreateMap<BankAccountDM, BankAccount>()
            .ReverseMap();
    }

    public class AppUserDomainSerivce
    {
        private readonly AppUserRepository _appUserRepository;

        public AppUserDomainSerivce(AppUserRepository appUserRepository)
        {
            _appUserRepository = appUserRepository;
        }

        public void AddBankAccount(BankAccountDM bankAccount, AppUserDM appUser)
        {
            appUser.BankAccounts.Add(bankAccount);

            // Save changes
            _appUserRepository.Save(appUser);
        }
    }

    public class AppUserRepository
    {
        public AppUserDM Get(int id)
        {
            using (var ctx = new AppContext())
            {
                var userEntity = GetAppUser(id, ctx);
                return Mapper.Map<AppUserDM>(userEntity);
            }
        }

        public void Save(AppUserDM user)
        {
            // Save entity in storage
            using (var ctx = new AppContext())
            {
                var userEntity = GetAppUser(user.Id, ctx);
                userEntity = Mapper.Map(user, userEntity);

                ctx.SaveChanges();
            }
        }

        private AppUser GetAppUser(int id, AppContext ctx)
        {
            return ctx.AppUsers
                .Include("BankAccounts")
                .SingleOrDefault(x => x.Id == id);
        }
    }
}


// Entities and Domain Models

public class BankAccountDM
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string BankAccountNumber { get; set; }
}

public class BankAccount
{
    [Key]
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string BankAccountNumber { get; set; }
}

public class AppUserDM
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public List<BankAccountDM> BankAccounts { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

public class AppUser
{
    [Key]
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<BankAccount> BankAccounts { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}


// Entity DbContext

public class AppContext : DbContext
{
    public AppContext() : base("AppContext")
    {
    }

    public DbSet<AppUser> AppUsers { get; set; }
}

public Configuration()
{
    AutomaticMigrationsEnabled = true;
}

protected override void Seed(ConsoleApplication1.AppContext context)
{
    context.AppUsers.Add(new AppUser()
    {
        // This AppUser will get ID = 1 once saved into DB
        Name = "My Test User",
        BankAccounts = new List<BankAccount>()
        {
            new BankAccount()
            {
                BankAccountNumber = "Seeded Bank Account"
            }
        }
    });
}
  • Personally I don't bother with EF. I serialize the entities directly as json. Restoring is easy, just deserialize the object. However , I do publish events and I have events handlers creating/updating the read model and there you can use EF wildly (at what's its best: doing crud stuff with data structures). Btw your 'domain' is CRUDy as well, you only have data structures. If your tests are too simple, there's no need for advanced stuff. Forcing a simple use case into a solution suited for a complex use case is counter productive – MikeSW Jul 26 '15 at 16:05
  • I might want to take a look on serializing to JSON. It sounds pretty simple and encouragingly. Can you provide some links? And yes, the domains are simple and introducing DDD here might not be best option. It's only a playground to get some experiance. Not real commercial stuff. – pizycki Jul 26 '15 at 16:22
0

If I use your method (no eventsourcing); in the save method of reposiyory I usually read whole aggregate from db and then compare with the given one.

Sure we check that aggregate version read from db is same with the aggregate we want to save. So, single save method in repository can handle additions and deletions in domain entities and value objects.

Or you can also hold a state (new, modified,deleted etc.) in each aggregate-entity-value objects.

About storing aggregates as json; this post from Vaugh Vernon can be a helpful start.

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