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I read about optimistic locking scheme, where clients can read the values, perform there computation and when write needs to happen, Updates are validated before being written to database.

Lets say If we employ version mechanism for Optimistic Locks then (In case two clients) both will be having update statements as :

update tableName Set field = val, version = oldVersion +1 where version = OldVersion and Id = x;

Now lets consider the following scenario with Two Clients :

  1. Both Clients read the values of field and version.
  2. Both Clients compute something at there end. Generate new value of field.
  3. Now Both Clients send query Request to Database Server.

    As soon as it reaches database : One Client Update Query starts executing. But in the mean time interleaving happens and other Client Update starts executing.

Will these query interleaving causes data races at table I mean to say, we can't say that Optimistic Lock executes on its own, for example I understand the case where row level locking happens or other locking like table level locking happens, then its fine. But then its like Optimistic Locks doesn't work on its own, it needs pessimistic lock also(row level/ table level, which totally depends on underlying Storage Engine Implementation).

What happens when there is no Row / table level locks already there, but want to implement Optimistic Locking strategy. With query interleaving will it causes data races at table.(I mean to say only field is updated and version is not and then interleaving happens. Is this totally depends on what Isolation levels are set for query)?

I'm little bit confused with this scenario.

Also what is the right use case where optimistic Locking can be really helpful and increase the overall performance of application as compared to Pessimistic Locking.

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  • As you already state yourself: You increase performance but decrease transactional reliability. It is a trade off which sometimes can be solved by adding hardware and by taking a real good look at the code and reduce the number of queries to the database by using more efficient queries (Group transactions, create selects with joins etc) – Norbert van Nobelen Jul 26 '15 at 16:59
  • @Norbert van Nobelen: Regarding performance Increase I'm unable to understand the scenario. But Optimistic locks seems to Increases the Responsiveness of the application. User is not blocked to do something on the shared resource which can be edited by multiple clients at the same time, before validation. Performance can't be improved because if number of clients are large, and updating simultaneously then too many Redo's will happen, which I think is worse than exclusive locks. But again Optimistic Locks are not good for high contention resources. Whats your thoughts on this ? – bharatj Jul 27 '15 at 6:13
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The scenario in pseudo code for the worst case scenario: Two clients update the same record:

Scenario 1 (your scenario: optimistic locking):

Final constraints are checked at the server side. Optimistic locking is used only for presentation purposes.

Client one orders a product of which there is only 1 in stock.

Client two orders the same product of which there is only 1 in stock.

Both clients get this presented on the screen.

Products table:

 CREATE TABLE products (
   product_id VARCHAR(200),
   stock INT,
   price DOUBLE(5,2)
 ) ENGINE=InnoDB;

Presentation code:

 -- Presentation:
 SELECT * FROM products WHERE product_id="product_a";
 -- Presented to client

Order code:

 -- Verification of record (executed in the same block of code within 
 -- an as short time interval as possible):
 SELECT stock FROM products WHERE product_id="product_a";
 IF(stock>0) THEN
 -- Client clicks "order" (one click method=also payment);
   START TRANSACTION;
     -- Gets a record lock
     SELECT * FROM products WHERE product_id="product_a" FOR UPDATE; 
     UPDATE products SET stock=stock-1 WHERE product_id="product_a";
     INSERT INTO orders (customer_id,product_id,price) 
       VALUES (customer_1, "product_a",price);
   COMMIT;
 END IF;

The result of this scenario is that both orders can succeed: They both get the stock>0 from the first select, and then execute the order placement. This is an unwanted situation (in almost any scenario). So this would then have to be addressed in code by cancelling the order, taking a few more transactions.

Scenario 2: Alternative to optimistic locking:

Final constraints are checked at the database side. Optimistic locking is used only for presentation purposes. Less database queries then in the previous optimistic locking scenario, less chance of redos.

Client one orders a product of which there is only 1 in stock.

Client two orders the same product of which there is only 1 in stock.

Both clients get this presented on the screen.

Products table:

 CREATE TABLE products (
   product_id VARCHAR(200),
   stock INT,
   price DOUBLE(5,2),
   CHECK (stock>=-1) -- The constraint preventing ordering
 ) ENGINE=InnoDB;

Presentation code:

 -- Presentation:
 SELECT * FROM products WHERE product_id="product_a";
 -- Presented to client

Order code:

 -- Client clicks "order" (one click method=also payment);
 START TRANSACTION;
   -- Gets a record lock
   SELECT * FROM products WHERE product_id="product_a" FOR UPDATE; 
   UPDATE products SET stock=stock-1 WHERE product_id="product_a";
   INSERT INTO orders (customer_id,product_id,price) 
     VALUES (customer_1, "product_a",price);
 COMMIT;

So now two customers get presented this product, and click order on the same time. The system executes both orders simultaneous. The result will be: One order will be placed, the other gets an exception since the constraint will fail to verify, and the transaction will be aborted. This abort (exception) will have to be handled in code but does not take any further queries or transactions.

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  • I got your point, Just for proper understanding I feel that unlike pessimistic locks which physically lock certain unit of memory, Optimistic lock can't do the same. It needs some locking mechanism underneath. Here lets assume that while developing some cache engine using certain data structure, then optimistic lock will create trouble, If you don't use synchronized(for handling concurrency) mechanism in your data structure. But again Optimistic Lock assumes that "There will be very less to no Contention while using the memory". – bharatj Jul 28 '15 at 9:45
  • Anyway: Under high load with MySQL (or MariaDB) with the above locking mechanism your system will not survive (any of the scenarios): Reality in a high load system (one of my own) is that row locks escalate to page locks, on which MySQL/MariaDB then still throws a dead lock. Under high load situations look at Oracle (my first choice because of how it can be configured), SQL Server (extremely good with small transactions) or PostGres (should be similar to Oracle for configuration however I have not yet seen it in really serious applications). – Norbert van Nobelen Jul 28 '15 at 14:52

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