I am trying to execute the following query:

INSERT INTO table_listnames (name, address, tele)
VALUES ('Rupert', 'Somewhere', '022')
WHERE NOT EXISTS (
    SELECT name FROM table_listnames WHERE name='value'
);

But this returns an error. Basically I don't want to insert a record if the 'name' field of the record already exists in another record - how to check if the new name is unique?

  • 4
    possible duplicate of How to 'insert if not exists' in MySQL? – warren Jun 15 '12 at 21:49
  • 8
    All of the current answers to this or dupes assume that you can add a unique index. Sometimes the decision is based on business logic that can't be imposed on the whole table. For example, you allow multiple rows with a certain value in a column, but another value in the column will only be allowed to appear on one row. How do we accomplish that? – Oscar May 2 '14 at 23:37
  • see also: stackoverflow.com/q/1361340/4418 – warren Jan 6 '16 at 15:03

15 Answers 15

up vote 387 down vote accepted

I'm not actually suggesting that you do this, as the UNIQUE index as suggested by Piskvor and others is a far better way to do it, but you can actually do what you were attempting:

CREATE TABLE `table_listnames` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL auto_increment,
  `name` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `address` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `tele` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY  (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

Insert a record:

INSERT INTO table_listnames (name, address, tele)
SELECT * FROM (SELECT 'Rupert', 'Somewhere', '022') AS tmp
WHERE NOT EXISTS (
    SELECT name FROM table_listnames WHERE name = 'Rupert'
) LIMIT 1;

Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)
Records: 1  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

SELECT * FROM `table_listnames`;

+----+--------+-----------+------+
| id | name   | address   | tele |
+----+--------+-----------+------+
|  1 | Rupert | Somewhere | 022  |
+----+--------+-----------+------+

Try to insert the same record again:

INSERT INTO table_listnames (name, address, tele)
SELECT * FROM (SELECT 'Rupert', 'Somewhere', '022') AS tmp
WHERE NOT EXISTS (
    SELECT name FROM table_listnames WHERE name = 'Rupert'
) LIMIT 1;

Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)
Records: 0  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

+----+--------+-----------+------+
| id | name   | address   | tele |
+----+--------+-----------+------+
|  1 | Rupert | Somewhere | 022  |
+----+--------+-----------+------+

Insert a different record:

INSERT INTO table_listnames (name, address, tele)
SELECT * FROM (SELECT 'John', 'Doe', '022') AS tmp
WHERE NOT EXISTS (
    SELECT name FROM table_listnames WHERE name = 'John'
) LIMIT 1;

Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)
Records: 1  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

SELECT * FROM `table_listnames`;

+----+--------+-----------+------+
| id | name   | address   | tele |
+----+--------+-----------+------+
|  1 | Rupert | Somewhere | 022  |
|  2 | John   | Doe       | 022  |
+----+--------+-----------+------+

And so on...

  • 10
    Thanks that helped. My actual problem is far more complex and the column just cannot be unique and I cannot depend on the primary key. But this is exactly what I was looking for. – Rupert Jul 2 '10 at 10:41
  • 2
    @Piskovar: Agreed. @Rupert: you should index the column referred to in the inner select statement (name, in this case), if at all possible. Note also that you can do SELECT 'John', 'Doe', '022' FROM table_listnames, instead of SELECT * FROM (SELECT 'John', 'Doe', '022') AS tmp - but that will only work if table_listnames already contains one or more rows. I doubt the speed is any different though, so it's probably not a concern. – Mike Jul 2 '10 at 10:54
  • 2
    @VijayRamamurthy: This works because you Insert the result of an Select statement. Read the query carefully -> The WHERE statement belongs to the SELECT query. The Select query either returns a single data-row (data is inserted) or no data at all (nothing is inserted) – Philipp Sep 27 '13 at 14:42
  • 13
    This does not seem to work if you want to insert the same value twice into different fields (e.g. SELECT 'Humbert', 'Humbert', '1' in the inner select). I receive a ERROR 1060 (42S21): Duplicate column name – cburgmer Oct 10 '13 at 12:25
  • 23
    @cburgmer I got the same problem #1060 - Duplicate column name. Have you found a solution? Edit: Found it. Add behind each value an AS: SELECT * FROM (SELECT 'Rupert' as name, 'Rupert' as friend, '022' as number) AS tmp – Kai Noack Feb 17 '14 at 15:14

INSERT doesn't allow WHERE in the syntax.

What you can do: create a UNIQUE INDEX on the field which should be unique (name), then use either:

  • normal INSERT (and handle the error if the name already exists)
  • INSERT IGNORE (which will fail silently cause a warning (instead of error) if name already exists)
  • INSERT ... ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE (which will execute the UPDATE at the end if name already exists, see documentation)
  • 10
    Thank you for listing the available options. INSERT IGNORE helped me. – Xynariz Feb 11 '14 at 17:48
  • 18
    Thank youuuu, 3.5 years later and still helping people :). – Andrew Feb 26 '14 at 23:29
  • 8
    5 years later and still helping ppl :) – motan May 20 '15 at 11:55
  • 2
    when INSERT is ignored auto_increment value increases... – illusionJJ Apr 28 '16 at 13:12
  • 2
    8 years and still helping you legend :) – ACHC Aug 16 at 19:39

Worked :

INSERT INTO users (full_name, login, password) 
  SELECT 'Mahbub Tito','tito',SHA1('12345') FROM DUAL
WHERE NOT EXISTS 
  (SELECT login FROM users WHERE login='tito');
  • This only works for Oracle databases right? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DUAL_table This question is specifically about MySQL ! – Highly Irregular Oct 4 '16 at 7:55
  • 1
    I doesn't test in Oracle database. It is working fine at MySQL and tested. – Mahbub Tito Oct 16 '16 at 4:15
  • 6
    I since learned "dual" is available in MySQL but not in MariaDB, the open source branch of MySQL – Highly Irregular Oct 16 '16 at 7:53
  • 2
    From @HighlyIrregular's wikipedia link "Several other databases (including Microsoft SQL Server, MySQL, PostgreSQL, SQLite, and Teradata) enable one to omit the FROM clause entirely if no table is needed. This avoids the need for any dummy table." The same query seems to work in MySql (5.7, if that matters) without the FROM DUAL. – stannius May 14 at 19:05
  • Tested and working fine in MariaDB! Thank you @MahbubTito – Jefferson Vasconcelos Sep 19 at 3:02

MySQL provides a very cute solution :

REPLACE INTO `table` VALUES (5, 'John', 'Doe', SHA1('password'));

Very easy to use since you have declared a unique primary key (here with value 5).

  • 3
    But it updates the record (look at affected rows) – Azmeer Nov 5 '15 at 5:21
  • to prevent it you need to create a unique index, more info here:link – Azmeer Nov 5 '15 at 5:34
  • Excellent and very simple! – Karra Sep 1 at 8:09
INSERT IGNORE INTO `mytable`
SET `field0` = '2',
`field1` = 12345,
`field2` = 12678;

Here the mysql query, that insert records if not exist and will ignore existing similar records.

----Untested----
  • 4
    it doesnt worked for me, INSERT IGNORE INTO emAssignedTagsForEvent SET eventId='2',defaultTagId='1'; – pitu Jun 7 '14 at 5:29
  • 8
    Looks like a mixture of insert and update syntaxes. Do you mean INSERT IGNORE INTO `mytable` (`field0`, `field1`, `field2`) values ('2', 12345, 12678);? – Hobo Oct 22 '14 at 12:33
  • @Hobo From MySQL Manual dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/insert.html INSERT syntax: It can be INSERT [...] IGNORE INTO mytable VALUES ... Or INSERT [...] IGNORE INTO mytable SET col_name={expr | DEFAULT},... – Shirkam Jul 26 '17 at 6:43
  • "If you use the IGNORE modifier, errors that occur while executing the INSERT statement are ignored.". So basically you didn't solved anything. – Marcelo Agimóvel Dec 26 '17 at 12:25

If you really can't get a unique index on the table, you could try...

INSERT INTO table_listnames (name, address, tele)
    SELECT 'Rupert', 'Somewhere', '022'
        FROM some_other_table
        WHERE NOT EXISTS (SELECT name
                              FROM table_listnames
                              WHERE name='Rupert')
        LIMIT 1;

To overcome similar problem, I have made the table I am inserting to have a unique column. Using your example, on creation I would have something like:

name VARCHAR(20),
UNIQUE (name)

and then use the following query when inserting into it:

INSERT IGNORE INTO train
set table_listnames='Rupert'

You can easily use the following way :

INSERT INTO ... ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE ...

By this way you can insert any new raw and if you have duplicate data, replace specific column ( best columns is timestamps ).
For example :

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS Devices (
  id         INT(6)       NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  unique_id  VARCHAR(100) NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
  created_at VARCHAR(100) NOT NULL,
  UNIQUE KEY unique_id (unique_id),
  UNIQUE KEY id (id)
)
  CHARACTER SET utf8
  COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci;

INSERT INTO Devices(unique_id, time) 
VALUES('$device_id', '$current_time') 
ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE time = '$current_time';

This query works well:

INSERT INTO `user` ( `username` , `password` )
    SELECT * FROM (SELECT 'ersks', md5( 'Nepal' )) AS tmp
    WHERE NOT EXISTS (SELECT `username` FROM `user` WHERE `username` = 'ersks' 
    AND `password` = md5( 'Nepal' )) LIMIT 1

And you can create the table using following query:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `user` (
    `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    `username` varchar(30) NOT NULL,
    `password` varchar(32) NOT NULL,
    `status` tinyint(1) DEFAULT '0',
    PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB  DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1 AUTO_INCREMENT=1 ;

Note: Create table using second query before trying to use first query.

Brian Hooper : You almost hit the point but you have an error in your synatx. Your insert will never work. I tested on my database and here is the right answer:

INSERT INTO podatki (datum,ura,meritev1,meritev1_sunki,impulzi1,meritev2,meritev2_sunki,impulzi2)
            SELECT '$datum', '$ura', '$meritve1','$sunki1','$impulzi1','$meritve2','$sunki2','$impulzi2'
                FROM dual
                WHERE NOT EXISTS (SELECT datum,ura
                                      FROM podatki
                                      WHERE datum='$datum' and ura='$ura'

I'm giving you my example of y table. Insert is almost the same like Bian Hooper wrote, except that I put the select FROM DUAL ont from other table. Cind regards, Ivan

  • 2
    What is that "dual"? A built in keyword? I just don't see the difference from what Brian said... EDIT: Further investigation got mixed and contradicting (?) results. While SQL DUAL table page says that MySQL does not support DUAL tables, the MySQL manual says that it does. My own test show that it doesn't, since it gives unknown table status: TABLE_TYPE messages, although the query yielded a result. Probably because MySQL doesn't require the FROM DUAL clause? – not2qubit Oct 29 '13 at 18:55
insert into customer_keyskill(customerID, keySkillID)
select  2,1 from dual
where not exists ( 
    select  customerID  from customer_keyskill 
    where customerID = 2 
    and keySkillID = 1 )

You are inserting not Updating the result. You can define the name column in primary column or set it is unique.

  • thing is i cant set it to primary or unique – Rupert Jul 2 '10 at 9:41

I had a problem, and the method Mike advised worked partly, I had an error Dublicate Column name = '0', and changed the syntax of your query as this`

     $tQ = "INSERT  INTO names (name_id, surname_id, sum, sum2, sum3,sum4,sum5) 
                SELECT '$name', '$surname', '$sum', '$sum2', '$sum3','$sum4','$sum5' 
FROM DUAL
                WHERE NOT EXISTS (
                SELECT sum FROM names WHERE name_id = '$name' 
AND surname_id = '$surname') LIMIT 1;";

The problem was with column names. sum3 was equal to sum4 and mysql throwed dublicate column names, and I wrote the code in this syntax and it worked perfectly,

  • 1
    Life-saver, thanks mate! – Areeb Sep 28 '17 at 13:29

I had a similar problem and I needed to insert multiple if not existing. So from the examples above I came to this combination... it's here just in case somebody would need it.

Notice: I had to define name everywhere as MSSQL required it... MySQL works with * too.

INSERT INTO names (name)
SELECT name
FROM
(
  SELECT name
  FROM
  (
     SELECT 'Test 4' as name
  ) AS tmp_single
  WHERE NOT EXISTS
  (
     SELECT name FROM names WHERE name = 'Test 4'
  )
  UNION ALL
  SELECT name
  FROM
  (
     SELECT 'Test 5' as name
  ) AS tmp_single
  WHERE NOT EXISTS
  (
     SELECT name FROM names WHERE name = 'Test 5'
  )
) tmp_all;

MySQL: CREATE TABLE names ( OID int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, name varchar(32) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci NOT NULL, PRIMARY KEY (OID), UNIQUE KEY name_UNIQUE (name) ) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=1;

or

MSSQL: CREATE TABLE [names] ( [OID] INT IDENTITY (1, 1) NOT NULL, [name] NVARCHAR (32) NOT NULL, PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED ([OID] ASC) ); CREATE UNIQUE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [Index_Names_Name] ON [names]([name] ASC);

This query can be used in PHP code.

I have an ID column in this table, so I need check for duplication for all columns except this ID column:

#need to change values
SET @goodsType = 1, @sybType=5, @deviceId = asdf12345SDFasdf2345;    


INSERT INTO `devices` (`goodsTypeId`, `goodsId`, `deviceId`) #need to change tablename and columnsnames
SELECT * FROM (SELECT @goodsType, @sybType, @deviceId) AS tmp
WHERE NOT EXISTS (
    SELECT 'goodsTypeId' FROM `devices` #need to change tablename and columns names
    WHERE `goodsTypeId` = @goodsType
        AND `goodsId` = @sybType
        AND `deviceId` = @deviceId
) LIMIT 1;

and now new item will be added only in case of there is not exist row with values configured in SET string

protected by Community Sep 7 '17 at 10:55

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