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Suppose I create a dialog with jQuery (if relevant - 1.7.1). The dialog opens a div (let's name it "divToEmpty") that can contain thousands of text divs inside of it. Suppose further that I want to empty the aforementioned div on dialog close.

There are 2 options:

// options 1

$('#divToEmpty').dialog({
    beforeClose: function() {
        $('#divToEmpty').html('');
    }
});

// option 2

$('#divToEmpty').dialog({
    close: function() {
        $('#divToEmpty').html('');
    }
});

Option 1 is much, much faster than option 2 (which crashes jQuery script on large enough quantity of inside divs).

Why?

My conjecture is that some infinite loop gets created when resetting a closing dialog (cascades of DOM and style changes or something like that), which is avoided is you reset the div first and then close the dialog. But this idea is funky in itself...

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  • To be precise I'd wouldn't call it an infinite loop but maximum allowable memory being reached during execution. I'd like to see the implementation of dialog close. It sounds like it interacts with at least some children based on your description. Commented Jul 27, 2015 at 17:38
  • Yeah thought about making that distinction, but forgot :) Regarding the "close" - do you mean the jQuery close or my close in the declaration? The options I've written are pretty much it (it's either only beforeClose or only close).
    – st2rseeker
    Commented Jul 29, 2015 at 10:42
  • I meant seeing the source code implementation of close for jQuery or JavaScript, since the API only shows how to properly use it but does not explain what exactly is the sequence of commands and considerations when closing a dialog (if any). Commented Jul 29, 2015 at 22:22
  • Will try looking there, thanks :)
    – st2rseeker
    Commented Aug 2, 2015 at 12:45
  • Looks fine to me. May be you should use latest jquery and jquery ui. Commented Aug 3, 2015 at 8:47

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