54

I am able to serialize and deserialize a class hierarchy where the abstract base class is annotated with

@JsonTypeInfo(
    use = JsonTypeInfo.Id.MINIMAL_CLASS,
    include = JsonTypeInfo.As.PROPERTY,
    property = "@class")

but no @JsonSubTypes listing the subclasses, and the subclasses themselves are relatively unannotated, having only a @JsonCreator on the constructor. The ObjectMapper is vanilla, and I'm not using a mixin.

Jackson documentation on PolymorphicDeserialization and "type ids" suggests (strongly) I need the @JsonSubTypes annotation on the abstract base class, or use it on a mixin, or that I need to register the subtypes with the ObjectMapper. And there are plenty of SO questions and/or blog posts that agree. Yet it works. (This is Jackson 2.6.0.)

So ... am I the beneficiary of an as-yet-undocumented feature or am I relying on undocumented behavior (that may change) or is something else going on? (I'm asking because I really don't want it to be either of the latter two. But I gots to know.)

EDIT: Adding code - and one comment. The comment is: I should have mentioned that all the subclasses I'm deserializing are in the same package and same jar as the base abstract class.

Abstract base class:

package so;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.annotation.JsonTypeInfo;

@JsonTypeInfo(
    use = JsonTypeInfo.Id.MINIMAL_CLASS,
    include = JsonTypeInfo.As.PROPERTY,
    property = "@class")
public abstract class PolyBase
{
    public PolyBase() { }

    @Override
    public abstract boolean equals(Object obj);
}

A subclass of it:

package so;
import org.apache.commons.lang3.builder.EqualsBuilder;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.annotation.JsonCreator;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.annotation.JsonProperty;

public final class SubA extends PolyBase
{
    private final int a;

    @JsonCreator
    public SubA(@JsonProperty("a") int a) { this.a = a; }

    public int getA() { return a; }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        if (null == obj) return false;
        if (this == obj) return true;
        if (this.getClass() != obj.getClass()) return false;

        SubA rhs = (SubA) obj;
        return new EqualsBuilder().append(this.a, rhs.a).isEquals();
    }
}

Subclasses SubB and SubC are the same except that field a is declared String (not int) in SubB and boolean (not int) in SubC (and the method getA is modified accordingly).

Test class:

package so;    
import java.io.IOException;
import org.apache.commons.lang3.builder.EqualsBuilder;
import org.testng.annotations.Test;
import static org.assertj.core.api.Assertions.*;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.annotation.JsonCreator;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.annotation.JsonProperty;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.ObjectMapper;

public class TestPoly
{
    public static class TestClass
    {
        public PolyBase pb1, pb2, pb3;

        @JsonCreator
        public TestClass(@JsonProperty("pb1") PolyBase pb1,
                         @JsonProperty("pb2") PolyBase pb2,
                         @JsonProperty("pb3") PolyBase pb3)
        {
            this.pb1 = pb1;
            this.pb2 = pb2;
            this.pb3 = pb3;
        }

        @Override
        public boolean equals(Object obj) {
            if (null == obj) return false;
            if (this == obj) return true;
            if (this.getClass() != obj.getClass()) return false;

            TestClass rhs = (TestClass) obj;
            return new EqualsBuilder().append(pb1, rhs.pb1)
                                      .append(pb2, rhs.pb2)
                                      .append(pb3, rhs.pb3)
                                      .isEquals();
        }
    }

    @Test
    public void jackson_should_or_should_not_deserialize_without_JsonSubTypes() {

        // Arrange
        PolyBase pb1 = new SubA(5), pb2 = new SubB("foobar"), pb3 = new SubC(true);
        TestClass sut = new TestClass(pb1, pb2, pb3);

        ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();

        // Act
        String actual1 = null;
        TestClass actual2 = null;

        try {
            actual1 = mapper.writeValueAsString(sut);
        } catch (IOException e) {
            fail("didn't serialize", e);
        }

        try {
            actual2 = mapper.readValue(actual1, TestClass.class);
        } catch (IOException e) {
            fail("didn't deserialize", e);
        }

        // Assert
        assertThat(actual2).isEqualTo(sut);
    }
}

This test passes and if you break at the second try { line you can inspect actual1 and see:

{"pb1":{"@class":".SubA","a":5},
 "pb2":{"@class":".SubB","a":"foobar"},
 "pb3":{"@class":".SubC","a":true}}

So the three subclasses got properly serialized (each with their class name as id) and then deserialized, and the result compared equal (each subclass has a "value type" equals()).

0
65

There are two ways to achieve polymorphism in serialization and deserialization with Jackson. They are defined in Section 1. Usage in the link you posted.

Your code

@JsonTypeInfo(
    use = JsonTypeInfo.Id.MINIMAL_CLASS,
    include = JsonTypeInfo.As.PROPERTY,
    property = "@class")

is an example of the second approach. The first thing to note is that

All instances of annotated type and its subtypes use these settings (unless overridden by another annotation)

So this config value propagates to all subtypes. Then, we need a type identifier that will map a Java type to a text value in the JSON string and vice versa. In your example, this is given by JsonTypeInfo.Id#MINIMAL_CLASS

Means that Java class name with minimal path is used as the type identifier.

So a minimal class name is generated from the target instance and written to the JSON content when serializing. Or a minimal class name is used to determine the target type for deserializing.

You could have also used JsonTypeInfo.Id#NAME which

Means that logical type name is used as type information; name will then need to be separately resolved to actual concrete type (Class).

To provide such a logical type name, you use @JsonSubTypes

Annotation used with JsonTypeInfo to indicate sub types of serializable polymorphic types, and to associate logical names used within JSON content (which is more portable than using physical Java class names).

This is just another way to achieve the same result. The documentation you're asking about states

Type ids that are based on Java class name are fairly straight-forward: it's just class name, possibly some simple prefix removal (for "minimal" variant). But type name is different: one has to have mapping between logical name and actual class.

So the various JsonTypeInfo.Id values that deal with class names are straight-forward because they can be auto-generated. For type names, however, you need to give the mapping value explicitly.

6
  • 1
    Thanks for explaining that @JsonSubTypes is needed only if you use the NAME form. All that documentation I read and I didn't figure that out ...
    – davidbak
    Jul 28 '15 at 3:32
  • 8
    The bummer here is that if you use the Name form (which is vastly preferable), you cannot dynamically add class or add classes later.
    – HDave
    Jun 15 '16 at 16:28
  • 4
    Doesn't using JsonTypeInfo on the individual concrete classes makes more sense? Using it over the interface seem to violate the open-close principle i suppose (as in we need to modify our interface on every new addition of a concrete implementation). Please correct me if am missing something here
    – Harshit
    Aug 1 '17 at 21:59
  • 1
    @HDave: You can use ObjectMapper#registerSubtypes, potentially with something like Reflections. May 7 '19 at 4:39
  • 1
    As mentioned by c-c, we successfully use @JsonTypeInfo(use=JsonTypeInfo.Id.NAME, property="message_type") and then register every class with the newly-created mapper: mapper.registerSubtypes(new NamedType(SomeClass.class, "some_class"));. This works when you know all of the classes at run-time but can't change the base class, so you don't need to list everything in JsonSubTypes.
    – Wheezil
    Dec 27 '20 at 2:06

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