4

I am using TurboC++. I write the following expression which is not resulting in proper evaluation, am I missing some concept behind it?

int c=300*300/300;
printf("%d",c);

The output is

81

Why?

9
  • 7
    What is sizeof(int)?
    – EOF
    Jul 28, 2015 at 13:12
  • It was just that I typed 'C' instead of 'c' while asking the question. I have made the edit. It's 'c' in lower case itself.
    – CocoCrisp
    Jul 28, 2015 at 13:12
  • 2
    It is 2 byte. I am using DosBox.
    – CocoCrisp
    Jul 28, 2015 at 13:13
  • 8
    So, if sizeof(int) == 2, then what is INT_MAX?
    – EOF
    Jul 28, 2015 at 13:14
  • 2
    @Vultrao the TC++ package includes a C compiler and a C++ compiler
    – M.M
    Jul 28, 2015 at 13:23

2 Answers 2

27
300*300 is 90000.

Assuming int is 16bit, you have overflowed.

The overflow wraps around, giving you: 24464.

24465/300 = 81.55

Do not rely on this. It is undefined behavior.

9
  • Does that mean if I run the above program on gcc then the output would be correct? Because there the size of int is 4byte or 32bit.
    – CocoCrisp
    Jul 28, 2015 at 13:18
  • 1
    Yes, but you would be better to change your method rather than tools.
    – Sarima
    Jul 28, 2015 at 13:19
  • Sure I will. Thanks I missed the concept of integer range.
    – CocoCrisp
    Jul 28, 2015 at 13:20
  • 1
    Just a quick note: the integer size with gcc is not necessarily 4 bytes, this depends on the platform. If you want integers with a specific size, use the types from stdint.h, e.g. int32_t. (These may not exist with Turbo C++ as it is quite old.) Jul 28, 2015 at 13:22
  • 1
    loooooool 16 bit int. Jul 28, 2015 at 14:54
9

The evaluation of 300 * 300 / 300 happens from left to right.

300 * 300 overflows a 16 bit signed integral type (an int in Turbo C++ is 16 bit). As the computation will take place in signed arithmetic, the result is undefined.

What's happening is 300 * 300 is wrapping round to give you 24464. (24464 + 32768 + 32768 = 90000).

24464 / 300 is 81 in integer division.

1
  • 3
    The type of an expression is based on the type of its operands - not their values. int multiplied by int gives int regardless of the values of the ints.
    – M.M
    Jul 28, 2015 at 13:25

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