16

I have the following code which is about 7 times faster than inet_addr . I was wondering if there is a way to improve this to make it even faster or if a faster alternative exists.

This code requires that a valid null terminated IPv4 address is supplied with no whitespace, which in my case is always the way, so I optimized for that case. Usually you would have more error checking, but if there is a way to make the following even faster or a faster alternative exists I would really appreciate it.

UINT32 GetIP(const char *p)
{
    UINT32 dwIP=0,dwIP_Part=0;
    while(true)
    {
        if(p[0] == 0)
        {
            dwIP = (dwIP << 8) | dwIP_Part;
            break;
        }
        if(p[0]=='.') 
        {       
            dwIP = (dwIP << 8) | dwIP_Part;                     
            dwIP_Part = 0;
           p++;
        }
        dwIP_Part = (dwIP_Part*10)+(p[0]-'0');
        p++;
    }
    return dwIP;
}
  • 9
    I think this is better suited to codereview.stackexchange.com – M.M Jul 28 '15 at 14:38
  • 4
    Why? I want to know what the fastest way to get an IP address from a string is. – Harry Jul 28 '15 at 14:41
  • 6
    You also should note that UINT32 might be not suitable for an IP address, without adjusting endianess to network byte order. – πάντα ῥεῖ Jul 28 '15 at 14:43
  • 9
    @Harry CodeReview specializes in reviewing working code (your code works), and they can suggest algorithmic improvements. That's not to say speed hacks aren't on-topic here. – Iwillnotexist Idonotexist Jul 28 '15 at 14:43
  • 3
    @Iwillnotexist Idonotexist I guess if my code is indeed the fastest in the world currently it might be worth going to the codereview to see if it can be faster? ;) I have seen faster integer conversion questions put on here and I think this is related to those types of questions. I couldn't find anything else myself on this topic and it may help others in the future if there are no other alternatives. – Harry Jul 28 '15 at 14:49
21

Since we are speaking about maximizing throughput of IP address parsing, I suggest using a vectorized solution.

Here is x86-specific fast solution (needs SSE4.1, or at least SSSE3 for poor):

__m128i shuffleTable[65536];    //can be reduced 256x times, see @IwillnotexistIdonotexist

UINT32 MyGetIP(const char *str) {
    __m128i input = _mm_lddqu_si128((const __m128i*)str);   //"192.167.1.3"
    input = _mm_sub_epi8(input, _mm_set1_epi8('0'));        //1 9 2 254 1 6 7 254 1 254 3 208 245 0 8 40 
    __m128i cmp = input;                                    //...X...X.X.XX...  (signs)
    UINT32 mask = _mm_movemask_epi8(cmp);                   //6792 - magic index
    __m128i shuf = shuffleTable[mask];                      //10 -1 -1 -1 8 -1 -1 -1 6 5 4 -1 2 1 0 -1 
    __m128i arr = _mm_shuffle_epi8(input, shuf);            //3 0 0 0 | 1 0 0 0 | 7 6 1 0 | 2 9 1 0 
    __m128i coeffs = _mm_set_epi8(0, 100, 10, 1, 0, 100, 10, 1, 0, 100, 10, 1, 0, 100, 10, 1);
    __m128i prod = _mm_maddubs_epi16(coeffs, arr);          //3 0 | 1 0 | 67 100 | 92 100 
    prod = _mm_hadd_epi16(prod, prod);                      //3 | 1 | 167 | 192 | ? | ? | ? | ?
    __m128i imm = _mm_set_epi8(-1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, 6, 4, 2, 0);
    prod = _mm_shuffle_epi8(prod, imm);                     //3 1 167 192 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
    return _mm_extract_epi32(prod, 0);
//  return (UINT32(_mm_extract_epi16(prod, 1)) << 16) + UINT32(_mm_extract_epi16(prod, 0)); //no SSE 4.1
}

And here is the required precalculation for shuffleTable:

void MyInit() {
    memset(shuffleTable, -1, sizeof(shuffleTable));
    int len[4];
    for (len[0] = 1; len[0] <= 3; len[0]++)
        for (len[1] = 1; len[1] <= 3; len[1]++)
            for (len[2] = 1; len[2] <= 3; len[2]++)
                for (len[3] = 1; len[3] <= 3; len[3]++) {
                    int slen = len[0] + len[1] + len[2] + len[3] + 4;
                    int rem = 16 - slen;
                    for (int rmask = 0; rmask < 1<<rem; rmask++) {
//                    { int rmask = (1<<rem)-1;    //note: only maximal rmask is possible if strings are zero-padded
                        int mask = 0;
                        char shuf[16] = {-1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1};
                        int pos = 0;
                        for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
                            for (int j = 0; j < len[i]; j++) {
                                shuf[(3-i) * 4 + (len[i]-1-j)] = pos;
                                pos++;
                            }
                            mask ^= (1<<pos);
                            pos++;
                        }
                        mask ^= (rmask<<slen);
                        _mm_store_si128(&shuffleTable[mask], _mm_loadu_si128((__m128i*)shuf));
                    }
                }
}

Full code with testing is avaliable here. On Ivy Bridge processor it prints:

C0A70103
Time = 0.406   (1556701184)
Time = 3.133   (1556701184)

It means that the suggested solution is 7.8 times faster in terms of throughput than the code by OP. It processes 336 millions of addresses per second (single core of 3.4 Ghz).

Now I'll try to explain how it works. Note that on each line of the listing you can see contents of the value just computed. All the arrays are printed in little-endian order (though set intrinsics use big-endian).

First of all, we load 16 bytes from unaligned address by lddqu instruction. Note that in 64-bit mode memory is allocated by 16-byte chunks, so this works well automatically. On 32-bit it may theoretically cause issues with out of range access. Though I do not believe that it really can. The subsequent code would work properly regardless of the values in the after-the-end bytes. Anyway, you'd better ensure that each IP address takes at least 16 bytes of storage.

Then we subtract '0' from all the chars. After that '.' turns into -2, and zero turns into -48, all the digits remain nonnegative. Now we take bitmask of signs of all the bytes with _mm_movemask_epi8.

Depending on the value of this mask, we fetch a nontrivial 16-byte shuffling mask from lookup table shuffleTable. The table is quite large: 1Mb total. And it takes quite some time to precompute. However, it does not take precious space in CPU cache, because only 81 elements from this table are really used. That is because each part of IP address can be either one, two, three digits long => hence 81 variants in total. Note that random trashy bytes after the end of the string may in principle cause increased memory footprint in the lookup table.

EDIT: you can find a version modified by @IwillnotexistIdonotexist in comments, which uses lookup table of only 4Kb size (it is a bit slower, though).

The ingenious _mm_shuffle_epi8 intrinsic allows us to reorder the bytes with our shuffle mask. As a result XMM register contains four 4-byte blocks, each block contains digits in little-endian order. We convert each block into a 16-bit number by _mm_maddubs_epi16 followed by _mm_hadd_epi16. Then we reorder bytes of the register, so that the whole IP address occupies the lower 4 bytes.

Finally, we extract the lower 4 bytes from the XMM register to GP register. It is done with SSE4.1 intrinsic (_mm_extract_epi32). If you don't have it, replace it with other line using _mm_extract_epi16, but it will run a bit slower.

Finally, here is the generated assembly (MSVC2013), so that you can check that your compiler does not generate anything suspicious:

lddqu   xmm1, XMMWORD PTR [rcx]
psubb   xmm1, xmm6
pmovmskb ecx, xmm1
mov ecx, ecx               //useless, see @PeterCordes and @IwillnotexistIdonotexist
add rcx, rcx               //can be removed, see @EvgenyKluev
pshufb  xmm1, XMMWORD PTR [r13+rcx*8]
movdqa  xmm0, xmm8
pmaddubsw xmm0, xmm1
phaddw  xmm0, xmm0
pshufb  xmm0, xmm7
pextrd  eax, xmm0, 0

P.S. If you are still reading it, be sure to check out comments =)

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    @PeterCordes The pmovmskb instruction is guaranteed to zero-fill the entire register (r32 or r64) it's asked to blow out. Unfortunately, the _mm_movemask_epi8() and underlying (on GCC) __builtin_ia32_pmovmskb128() intrinsics both return int, whence the compiler's urge to use the pmovmskb r32, xmm form rather than the pmovmskb r64, xmm form that would have been profitable. The compiler then feels the need to sign-extend, since the return value is nominally an int. I noticed that too and was trying to suppress it but realized the problem is deep-rooted. – Iwillnotexist Idonotexist Jul 28 '15 at 20:44
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    @Harry Must you absolutely make the table disappear, or can you afford to make it much smaller (say, 256 entries x 16 bytes/entry?) If so, stgatilov's code can be modified to distill the 81 possible valid digit masks using a perfect hash. A secret trick of mine for hashing is to use the single SSE4.2 instruction CRC, which you can use with _mm_crc32_*(). For this usecase, find a and n in mask = _mm_crc32_u16(0, mask << a) >> (32-n); such that you have 2^n bins and none of the valid masks collide after hashing. You probably should be able to get down to n=8 (256 entries). – Iwillnotexist Idonotexist Jul 29 '15 at 5:05
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    @EvgenyKluev I was successful in crafting a 256-bin perfect hash variant of stgatilov's excellent start. You may view it here (Warning, uses a GCC aligned attribute). It is just over half as fast, but occupies 256x less space for the LUT. – Iwillnotexist Idonotexist Jul 29 '15 at 21:26
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    Gentlemen, I've just successfully removed the crc instruction by using a different magic multiplication constant in my perfect hash. This new version therefore does not even require SSE4.2, and is slightly faster. Currently, on my i7-4700MQ processor, Time resources: stgatilov @ 0.465, myself @ 0.645 and Harry @ 2.996 seconds. Space resources: stgatilov @ 1MB, myself @ 4KB, Harry @ negligible. I'm therefore 40% slower but have 0.4% of the memory use, and my hash table load factor is 81/256 ~ 31.6% rather than 81/65536 ~ 0.12%. – Iwillnotexist Idonotexist Jul 30 '15 at 11:07
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    @Harry: I didn't test it but I expect that if we completely replace lookup by computations, this will slow up the fastest algorithm by 2 to 3 times. Still it is likely to be much faster than your version because many computations are done in parallel. Skylake architecture coming soon allows to vectorize lzcnt instruction (with AVX512 instruction set) so almost all computations may be done in parallel with it; but it is unlikely to outperform both approaches mentioned here. – Evgeny Kluev Jul 30 '15 at 12:28
1

As for alternatives: this is similar to yours but with some error checking:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <cstdint>

uint32_t getip(const std::string &sip)
{
    uint32_t r=0, b, p=0, c=0;
    const char *s;
    s = sip.c_str();
    while (*s)
    {
        r<<=8;
        b=0;
        while (*s&&((*s==' ')||(*s=='\t'))) s++;
        while (*s)
        {
            if ((*s==' ')||(*s=='\t')) { while (*s&&((*s==' ')||(*s=='\t'))) s++; if (*s!='.') break; }
            if (*s=='.') { p++; s++; break; }
            if ((*s>='0')&&(*s<='9'))
            {
                b*=10;
                b+=(*s-'0');
                s++;
            }
        }
        if ((b>255)||(*s=='.')) return 0;
        r+=b;
        c++;
    }
    return ((c==4)&&(p==3))?r:0;
}

void testip(const std::string &sip)
{
    uint32_t nIP=0;
    nIP = getip(sip);
    std::cout << "\nsIP = " << sip << " --> " << std::hex << nIP << "\n";
}

int main()
{
    testip("192.167.1.3");
    testip("292.167.1.3");
    testip("192.267.1.3");
    testip("192.167.1000.3");
    testip("192.167.1.300");
    testip("192.167.1.");
    testip("192.167.1");
    testip("192.167..1");
    testip("192.167.1.3.");
    testip("192.1 67.1.3.");
    testip("192 . 167 . 1 . 3");
    testip(" 192 . 167 . 1 . 3 ");
    return 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • What speed did you get compared to my original? – Harry Jul 30 '15 at 11:23
  • @Harry: I didn't do (don't have data for) specific bulk speed testing; would anyway only relate to the specific machine, but just running both with above data gives about same speed (meaningless here). – slashmais Jul 31 '15 at 7:20

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